Best Yamaha Saxophones

 

Amid various instruments that by Yamaha, the instrument that we’ll be reviewing today is the Best Yamaha Saxophone. It is an extremely interesting and challenging instrument, and the demand for it is growing every day. It was earlier used only for classical music, but at the beginning of the early 1900s, it found a new home with jazz music. All ages love playing this gorgeous and great instrument. Some want to be professionals while others want to learn the instrument as a hobby. Incredibly, Yamaha offers a wide range for all players’ demands.

Yamaha YAS-62

This is the best choice for those who want to experience outstanding quality as well as a longer-lasting sound quality at a fair price. It’s beautifully constructed and designed to create a great sound. Having hard steel springs and a slightly narrower neck bore compared to the 280 and 480 models, the 62 Yamaha alto and Yamaha Tenor saxophones have a faster response and better tone control than the lower-spec models.

The neck shape allows airflow to be more comfortable and helps players in achieving an incredible tonal base.

It’s been designed with great focus on detail and features a perfect structure to provide astonishing and precise responses in the lower range. There is no doubt about the quality of the 62 range of saxophones from Yamaha. Introduced in 1979, they set a standard that others had to aspire to. The standards went up for the manufacture of woodwind instruments, but especially for the saxophone. But with the 62 range, it wasn’t just about the quality of the instrument; it was also about giving it a competitive price.

The specifications of the product include the Eb key, adjustable thumb rest and bumper felt that can be adjusted with detachable bells, an engraved hand-crafted bell that adds to the elegance of the instrument, as well as the High F # and front F additional keys. This soprano sax is equipped with a mouthpiece as well as an extra-strong case. The additional case makes it much easier for players to transport their instruments. Key buttons are constructed from high-quality polyester.

It allows for free blowing and produces a mellow and warm tone. Additionally, the design was created with an eye on the user’s comfort. The instrument is unparalleled both in performance and quality.

Features:

  • Free blowing
  • Redesigned for speedy response
  • Beautiful tone
  • A nice case included
  • The new neck’s smaller bore gives it a quicker response and more control in comparison to the previous models.

Yamaha YAS-480

Yamaha YAS-480 can be described as an intermediate-level instrument designed for advanced students who wish to get their hands with something other than basic. It is a popular selection and teachers generally recommend this model because of its practical features, superior performance, and high-quality functionality.

Its design and structure are similar to high-end models from Yamaha. The addition of some useful features makes it more useful and suitable for those who are learning.

The bell design is hand-engraved, giving the sax an attractive and unique look. To improve the precise intonation, the neck is curved and this design is inspired by the one from Yamaha Professional line YAS 22.

The small technical adjustments are made effortlessly by using the adjustable screws on the keyguard. Additionally, this model provides rich and crisp tones that are lower in range. A unison C# closure is made possible with a new C# connector.

Features:

  • Hand engraving
  • It is compatible With Custom Yamaha necks
  • A more streamlined neck
  • Keyguard
  • Left-hand seesaw key

Yamaha Alto Saxophone YAS-280

This is one of the most recommended student models specifically made for beginners. It was designed taking into consideration the requirements of students and comes with easy-to-use features. It is a good idea to practice this to aid in learning for you.

It has been designed to allow for a more comfortable grip and also to give better access to the notes. It is lightweight and easy to hold. It is rather comfortable for beginners to take it on during lengthy training sessions without any strain.

In addition to amazing intonation, the Yamaha 280 also features a very simple and perfect sound. The stylish and attractive design is also appealing. What is more, the body is durable and corrosion-free. This means you can continue playing this sturdy instrument all the time you want. It is available in the gold lacquer finish which gives a professional appearance to the instrument. The lightweight frame is sturdy and makes it more robust.

The keys are extremely flexible and come with a case that allows you to carry them with ease. Its neck receiver is quite durable to ensure that students won’t damage it when adjusting the screws.

By using this instrument it is possible to easily play the low and high notes, thanks to the addition of a low B to C connector as well as an extremely precise F key.

Features:

  • Complete with Case
  • Made by Yamaha – World Leaders in Guitars and Keyboards
  • Yamaha Alto Sax, YAS-280
  • The gold lacquer finishes.
  • Keys for Front F and F#

Yamaha YTS-62III

It has become a popular option for bandmasters. The instrument is an upgrade from the model before it and features a modern design, great capabilities, and remarkable performance.

This stunning model has every one of the Yamaha brand features, making it a true masterpiece. Its additional characteristics include a narrower bore neck design, exquisitely intricate and detailed engraving, as well as more powerful connections of low B-C#, as well as an instrument case that is designed in a back-pack-style.

The neck is designed to give a faster response as well as to offer greater control over the performance. The new engraving is more attractive and increases the overall beauty of the instrument. Besides, the better connection between lower B and C# creates the most efficient seal for the notes and provides an extremely precise response. The case is made to give an updated appearance and makes transportation extremely easy.

It’s a great choice for professionals as its sturdy structure makes it stronger. The specifications for the product include the Bb key with buttons in polyester as well as a striking hand-engraved bell and mouthpiece for TS4C.

Features:

  • YTS-62III Professional Tenor Saxophone Lacquered
  • Popular with band directors for years. The model saxophones 62 (and their predecessor the model 61) has revolutionized the marketplace by providing the highest quality and durability for reasonable prices.
  • In 1979, the YAS-62 and YTS-62 saxophones stand up to the test of competition and time and remain in a continuous stage of improvement since the introduction of the YAS-61 in 1969.
  • The Yamaha YTS62III keeps the tradition of quality and affordability by introducing new features and prices

Yamaha YAS-82ZII

Are you searching for the most effective Yamaha Alto Saxophone? This could be it. This is the Custom Z series of instruments that was launched in 2003. The majority of people are truly delighted with this outstanding instrument. Since its creation, Yamaha has done what they typically perform with their instrument. They analyze their performance and make improvements where they can.

The advances have been amazing; however, Yamaha has managed to keep true to the instrument’s roots. Its origins have made it the instrument of choice for a large number of professional musicians. The silver-plated design looks fantastic. Custom Z saxes have bodies that are made of a special brass alloy for lighter weight. Despite being made from brass, the saxophone is categorized as a woodwind instrument as the sound is produced by an oscillating reed.

Easy To Play

Sticking to the traditions, the 82Z has a bell that is one piece. The sound is warmer on the lower end and adds a greater range of sound. The engraving was also revamped. Resonators are an essential component of any sax instrument and its sound. Domed metal versions on the 82Z make the sound clear and make it simpler to play.

The neck’s taper is now more efficient and gives more flexibility as well as an upgraded low B-C# connection providing a more secure seal. This improves sound quality in low registers. It also has a better sound response through the lower registers. The Front F key has also been upgraded. It’s still fast playing. The minor changes made by the manufacturer have been made in order to introduce a more fluid playing style.

If you’re looking at excellent instruments, you will be aware of their value. This is not just for the player but also for the person who listens. It is among the instruments. It is well-designed, and it provides an instrument that helps players to play to their maximum potential. It helps them reach their full mastering with the way it feels along with the sound that it produces.

Some will argue that it is expensive. It is true, and it could be viewed this way. However, when you purchase quality products, you have to be ready to pay for them.

This comes complete with a durable case.

Features:

  • Open and free tone, with a complex color
  • Lightning-fast action
  • Lovely design with engraving
  • Market verified and reliable
  • Hard case

Best Yamaha Alto Saxophones Buyers Guide

Buying The Right Yamaha Saxophone…

This isn’t an easy job. This is because Yamaha makes great instruments throughout the spectrum. This is made more complicated because there are 14 kinds of saxophones, with Alto and tenor being the most commonly used.

There is hardly any distinction in the Alto or Tenor. One of the main differences is their size. The Alto is smaller and pitched towards E flat. The Tenor is pitched B flat. The Tenor is therefore five steps lower in musical note than the Alto one. It doesn’t matter in the sense that the Tenor can play lower notes.

Get An Instrument Suitable For Your Level

If you’re a complete beginner, there’s not much reason to choose top-of-the-line instruments. There’s a learning curve to conquer and a beginner instrument is the best option to guide you get through it.

It is a great choice for a beginner in terms of which saxophone to use at the beginning of the musical practice. There are four types of saxophones and two are the most popular. There are times when you will hear a baritone sax, or a soprano saxophone, however, Alto and Tenor are the most common.

Which one is it?

For the beginner to get started, the Alto could be the ideal option. It is smaller and lighter, which means it’s easier to hold and carry around, and its size means that you require less puff. It won’t make much of a difference from the ear of the beginner in the tone, but the Tenor, as we’ve mentioned, has lower notes.

New Or Second Hand?

It is a difficult problem to be able to handle right away. A new instrument is more likely to be the best option. They’ll probably be in better working order and won’t show the wear and tear that a used instrument may have. If you choose to opt for a used instrument, make sure you look for any signs of water damage.

Saxophones may appear to be large and robust instruments, but they’re fragile if they’re not handled properly. If you purchase a brand new instrument, you’re likely to receive an insurance policy if there is a problem. There are second-hand Yamahas to be sold. They’re worth the money provided they’re in good shape, however, you must check their condition thoroughly.

Try Before You Buy

It’s possible that you won’t be able to sing an impressive melody in the beginning, but still, you’ll know how it feels playing the instrument. The neighborhood Yamaha dealer will be willing to demonstrate the instrument and assist you in making the right choice.

If you’re an experienced musician, you know the instrument you’re looking for. However, it’s not a bad idea to test it at the store.

And Finally…

We mentioned it in our review but we’ll go over it again. If you purchase without looking at the document, beware of counterfeits. There are a lot of them. It’s a sign of respect to the quality of these instruments if they are copied by people who attempt to market them.

It only happens to the top instruments, such as guitars, basses, or saxophones. Most of the time, larger firms who trade online are good, and if anything is wrong, they’ll resolve the issue. So, always purchase from trustworthy online retailers.

So, What Are The Best Yamaha Saxophones?

We’re looking for the top Yamaha Saxophones. Do you have one that stands like it is amidst the great models? It is. An instrument that is professional and includes everything. Our pick as the top Yamaha Saxophone is…

Yamaha YAS-82ZII Custom Z

It’s a fantastic instrument that has an amazing feeling of playing and its sound.

The top of the best Yamaha Alto Saxophones.

FAQ for Best Yamaha Saxophones

What are the benefits of Yamaha saxophones?

The Yamaha saxophones are known for their high-quality sound and durability. They are also known for their versatility, as they can be used in various musical genres.

The Yamaha saxophones are very popular in the music industry because of their quality and versatility.

How do maintain a Yamaha saxophone?

The Yamaha saxophone is a popular instrument in the music industry. It has a rich sound and is easy to maintain. This article will guide you on how to take care of your Yamaha saxophone.

– Clean the exterior of your saxophone with a dry cloth or soft brush

– Use a small amount of oil for lubrication

– Keep the mouthpiece clean and dry

– Avoid dropping it or exposing it to extreme weather conditions

How much does a Yamaha saxophone cost?

The Yamaha saxophone is a high quality instrument that can be found in most music stores. The price of the saxophone depends on the model, the features and its condition.

A Yamaha saxophone can cost anywhere from $200 to $3,000. The price varies depending on what you want with your instrument. For example, if you want a beginner’s model, it will be cheaper than if you wanted a professional one. If you are looking for an electric or acoustic instrument then it will also be more expensive than if you were looking for an acoustic one only.

Which models of Yamaha saxophones should I buy for my child?

The Yamaha YAS-62II is one of the most popular saxophones in the world. It is a great instrument for beginners and intermediate players. The instrument comes with a hard case, mouthpiece, neck strap, reeds and cork grease.

The Yamaha YAS-61II is a newer version of the YAS-62II with some improvements to make it more durable and easier to play. The 61 model also comes with a hard case, mouthpiece, neck strap, reeds and cork grease.

The Yamaha YTS-233S is perfect for children who are looking to take their playing skills to the next level. It has an ergonomic design that makes it easier for kids to play by themselves or with others.

What is the best Yamaha saxophone?

There are many Yamaha saxophones on the market, and it can be a daunting task to find the best one for you. To help you out, we have created this guide to show you what to look for in a Yamaha saxophone.

To start off with, there are two main types of Yamaha saxophones: student and professional. Student saxophones are usually cheaper, but they don’t last as long or produce as good sound quality as professional ones. Professional Yamaha Saxophones are more expensive and will last longer than student models. The most popular models of professional Yamaha Saxophones are the YAS-23 and YAS-25 series.

The next thing to consider is your budget. If you’re looking for an affordable model that sounds great then the YAS

What are the disadvantages of a Yamaha saxophone?

Playing a saxophone is not as easy as it looks. It takes time and practice to get the hang of it. A lot of people think that the saxophone is an expensive instrument to purchase, but there are some disadvantages to owning one.

The Yamaha saxophone is a good instrument for beginners who are just starting out on their musical journey, but there are some disadvantages that come with owning this instrument. The first disadvantage would be the price of the instrument itself. The Yamaha saxophone can range anywhere from $500-$3,000 depending on if you want a student or professional model, so it can be quite pricey for someone who’s just starting out and doesn’t know if they’ll stick with playing an instrument or not.

The second disadvantage comes in the form of maintenance costs.

What are the different types of Yamaha saxophones?

The Yamaha saxophones come in different types, and each of them has different features. One of the most popular models is the YAS-23 which has a semi-hollow body with a real wood finish. It also comes with a metal resonator to give it that classic sound.

Yamaha has been manufacturing saxophones for over 100 years and they have been able to create new models that suit their customers’ needs. The YAS-23 is one of their latest creations, and it comes with all the features you would want for an instrument like this.

What is the best brand of saxophone for beginners?

The best brand of saxophone for beginners is the Yamaha YAS-23.

This is because it has a great quality sound and it is affordable. It also has a good size and weight that makes it easy to handle.

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WESTAF Presentation Printable

From a Meeting Convened to Discuss the Feasibility of Cooperative Art Fair Applications and the Use of the Internet to Introduce Jurying Efficiencies

Prepared by WESTAF (Western States Arts Federation)
1543 Champa Street, Suite 220
Denver, Colorado 80202

These notes are neither minutes nor a transcription of the meeting. Rather, they are a reporting of the major points of discussion. Because the group was largely in consensus on the items discussed, the names of the individuals making various points are for the most part not reported.

In Attendance Larry Oliverson, Executive Director, NAIA; Shary Brown, Director Ann Arbor Street Art Fair; and Stephen King, Director of the MAIN ST. Fort Worth Arts Festival. Matthew Saunders, WESTAF Director of Technology and Anthony Radich, WESTAF Executive Director. Absent but participating in the organization of the meeting and in a review of the meeting’s discussion points was Bruce Storey, former Director of Denver’s Cherry Creek Arts Festival.

Opening Comments
Radich opened the meeting and noted that the gathering was designed to be a communication and brainstorming session, not a decision-making session. He remarked that the meeting’s outcome was far from pre-ordained and suggested that the recommendations that might emerge from the meeting would need to be considered by many other parties. In addition, he stated that any action that might evolve from the meeting would need to meet the test of providing a visible benefit to art fair management, artists, and WESTAF. He stated that WESTAF had an interest in the project because the organization was broadly committed to increasing audiences for the arts. He stated that the WESTAF staff viewed art fairs as an excellent means by which to accomplish this in the area of the visual arts.

Oliverson commented on the interest of artists in developing a more efficient application process. He noted that many artists were expending considerable time completing multiple application forms to art fairs when a universal form, especially one that could be accessed online, would be far more efficient. He called the group’s attention to the elements of a cooperative form the NAIA had prepared.

Brown noted that there were two distinct projects on the table. She identified one as the development of a universal application form and the other as the development of an online jurying process. She noted that the universal application form project was closer to realization than was the online jurying function. Regarding the universal application form, she reported that there was considerable field-wide agreement regarding its format and content. She advised the group to consider the online jurying project to be a related but separate matter.

Brown and King noted that both fair managers and artists had many questions regarding the efficacy of an online jurying system. They stated that such a system could only be introduced after many of the issues surrounding its construction and use were resolved. The group agreed that the overlap or nexus between the two projects should not be lost sight of but that the projects should be considered separately. The group concurred that online jurying was ultimately likely to become standard practice. They advised that the field should work toward such an eventuality and be prepared to knowledgeably adopt such services once they become generally accepted.

The Technological Capacity of Organizations and Artists
The group voiced concern that many art fair offices operate with outdated and/or inadequate hardware and software. They stated that many art fair sponsors had a limited financial ability to acquire improved hardware and that the provision of adequate training to operate more sophisticated software would be needed. The point was made that the implementation of any online universal application and/or jurying system would need to occur with the understanding that the field has many different levels of knowledge in the area of technology and a panoply of hardware and software systems.

In order to speed adoption of a cooperative application, the group suggested that consistent terms and working definitions be set down to ensure that those advising on the development of the cooperative form and/or jurying process are speaking the same language.

Artists were also identified as a group that has highly varying degrees of technological sophistication and very diverse hardware. The issue was raised that not every artist has ready access to the Internet. A discussion ensued regarding what the base line expectation regarding access should be for artists. The group consensus was that parallel paper and Internet systems might need to be operated simultaneously for a period of time until access to the Internet becomes more universal. Many believed that rapid adoption of Internet technology would eliminate this potential barrier in a very short period of time.

King reported that last year, the Fort Worth Arts Festival provided the option of an online application and that 8-9% had applied through that means. He noted that additional online applicants were expected in the coming year. King warned, however, that the debugging and perfection of an online system in its first years of operation generally eliminate any cost savings in those years and may actually introduce additional costs. Regarding the need to merge slides with online applications, he noted that this system’s potential for error was large and the risk grew larger as the number of applications increased. He stated that sufficient staff resources must be allocated to such a project.

Demonstration of ArtistsRegister.com
Saunders presented a demonstration of WESTAF’s ArtistsRegister.com project. He noted that, because WESTAF had already invested in the software and personnel costs for the project, the related universal art fair application and jurying projects could be designed and delivered for substantially less than a project started from scratch. The group discussed ways the functionality of the ArtistsRegister.com site could be adapted to accommodate the needs of art fairs.

Presentation of Key Factors in a Uniform Application
The group discussed a PowerPoint presentation made by WESTAF that outlined the possible key elements of a universal art fair application. The presentation was developed from two principal sources: a) the draft uniform application prepared by the NAIA, and b) a review of the applications of ten major art fairs.

Prior to the presentation, the following points were made:

  • All artists would have the option of receiving a CD tutorial detailing ways to effectively use the site. Participating shows may be asked to mail these out to all applicants.
  • The application program would be designed in a manner that would allow for one section to gather the majority of the information needed and the construction of separate “popup” segments that would allow some shows to acquire single show-specific information.
  • General information about the shows the artist is applying to would be provided and links to show sites would be provided. The purpose of these informational efforts is to help the shows maintain their identities and to provide artists with the information they need to make decisions about making application to various shows.

The application elements presented for discussion are listed below.

Elements Common to All Applications

  • Name
  • Business/Studio Name
  • Address
  • City
  • State
  • Zip
  • Check this box if this is a new address
  • Phone (day) (evening)
  • E-Mail (This will be used to notify artists of the receipt of their application
  • Fax
  • Artist’s Web site and space for a second web site

Partners/Collaborators

  • Name of partner/collaborator
  • Statement of how the partner/collaborator has contributed to the work in the work

Services

  • If asked, would you be willing to demonstrate?
  • Auction Donation: yes/no

Promotion

  • Would you send promotional post cards? If so, in what quantity?
  • Would you affix promotion stickers to your own promotional material? If so, in what quantity?

Slide Information Statement

  • 20 words or less with instructions suggesting the focus of the statement be on a description (materials, technique, etc.) of what the jurors are looking at and not on the artist’s overall artistic philosophy/inspiration

Slides

  • 1-7
  • 8 (booth slide)

The participants noted that a provision needs to be made to allow artists to provide up to seven slides of their work and have the option of supplying a booth slide. This would accommodate the fact that some shows require fewer than seven slides and not all show require a booth slide. In addition, provision should be made for the possibility that some shows may eventually request more than seven slides

Category

  • Printmaking
  • Painting
  • Photography
  • Drawing
  • Digital
  • 3D Mixed Media
  • 2D Mixed Media (includes handmade paper)
  • Leather
  • Sculpture
  • Glass
  • Pastels
  • Wood
  • Jewelry (metal)
  • Jewelry (non-metal)
  • Metalsmithing
  • Clay (funtional)
  • Clay (non-functional)
  • Fiber (dolls, baskets

Signature

  • Is there a way to limit the verbiage to which the signatures are affixed? If not, then a system can be designed to accommodate multiple statements. Applicant signature alone or applicant and partner/collaborator?
  • o Use a universal statement of originality and authenticity and customized
    statements for other features.
  • The signature should indicate that the artist has read and agrees to the rules appropriate to the show being applied for and that electronically signing the form represents a binding agreement to abide by those rules.

The group made the following comments about the draft form:

~The order in which items appear on an application can be an important factor when the applications are integrated into the various record keeping systems fairs now have in operation. Changing the order of some items could impose a major burden on many systems and their administration.

~Saunders replied that the system would be built in MySQL software. He explained that such software was quite powerful and allowed the operator to pull information out in a variety of forms and sequences. He further noted that the system was compatible with most existing software data systems. Saunders also explained that MySQL was more robust than Access software in that it could service more simultaneous users without crashing. He further noted that it was a Linux based rather than a Microsoft based system, which was an advantage because the Microsoft product had a reputation for being far more “buggy” than Linux. Saunders then reinforced the fact that the art fair offices would not need to purchase a Linux system as it had the capacity to convert data to other forms.

~Saunders explained the mailing list maintenance capability of any system that would be put into place. He reported that the WESTAF ArtistsRegister.com system provided up-to-date artist mailing lists on demand and had the capacity to identify complex subgroups from the universe represented in the system.

~The group advised that a code field and/or customer number field is needed. Saunders stated that the code could be hidden in a way that only fair administrators had access to it.

~The point was made that none of the fairs would want to lose their individual identities and that precautions needed to be taken to ensure that each fair had an opportunity to maintain and extend its identify. Several noted that the quality image of many shows was critical to their ability to attract quality artists. The group concluded that, because the topic was of central importance, there was a need for a position paper on the subject.

~The point was made that a universal application could detract from the identity of each show. The group discussed the use of popup boxes in the application as a means to differentiate the events. The suggestion was made that such boxes could help the shows maintain their individuality. In spite of this belief, the consensus was that every effort would be made to limit such boxes as they reduce the time savings and general efficiency of the uniform application. The group suggested that, while popup boxes should not be excluded as a means of differentiation, other means needed to be pursued to reinforce the individuality of the fairs. Members of the group noted the value of the prospectus as a marketing tool. Some discussion ensued regarding the many alternative means of building show identity other than through the application form.

~The issue of acquiring an official signature through online means was discussed. Saunders noted that many advances were being made in that area and that more were coming. He stated that, already, an online signature had been awarded the status of being equally valid to that of an original hand signature. He stated that the primary means for such a signature process was the verification of signature via a third party that validates a signature code matching the code assigned.

~The group stated that additional feedback on the application form from a selection of art fairs of all sizes would be necessary prior to a first draft being submitted to the field for comment.

~Slide information statements of 20 words in length or less were thought appropriate for the application. The point was made that such statements should be designed to describe the materials, technique etc. the jurors are looking at and are not intended to be an overarching statement of vision by the artist.

~The group advised that the section related to categories was the most problematic portion of the form. They noted that there was a lack of uniformity across shows regarding categories and that much would need to be worked out in order to become even moderately uniform. The suggestion was made that popup boxes that allow some differentiation may be most appropriate in this area of the application.

~The various kinds of reports that would need to be extracted from a universal application process data were discussed. Some of the report designed search abilities mentioned were: beginning and ending dates; the ability to make weekly/daily dumps of information; addresses; and timetables.

~The ability to add a second name to the form was considered important. Similarly, the group thought space for a second URL should be made available.

~The group advised that the system should have the ability to capture show-specific data such as willingness to demonstrate and willingness to participate in an auction. The consensus was that of significant importance was the disclosure of the request for such services and the disclosure of the implications of complying and not complying with that request. The group indicated that provision of electronic spaces for these functions should not be construed as an endorsement of their practice.

~Core application registration information should be on the first page of the application to ensure easy reference. The group further recommended that every effort be made to format the application on a single page to avoid turning the page either via computer or in paper form.

~The group referenced the draft universal application proposed by the NAIA and noted that artists should be heavily involved in the testing of any application. The group further noted that the organization of the application should be such that it is a step-by-step easily followed process.

~A detailed discussion was held regarding ways that customized information for certain shows could be included in the universal application. The WESTAF staff suggested the use of radio buttons. Such buttons, they stated, would allow easy navigation within the application site and give artists the opportunity to select shows that require additional information than that required on the universal application.

~The application and the application process need to enable artists to adjust the visual materials referenced in the applications to reflect the type of art preferred by each show.

~The application process needs to allow for the phenomenon of artists applying to one set of shows and deciding which shows to apply to next based on their early acceptances and/or rejections. Some discussion was held as to what additional charges an artist may incur if they were to apply multiple times rather than a single time. Another factor that they advised be built in is the ability of an artist to select another show if they are rejected from another that occurs on the same date.

~Consideration needs to be given to time sequencing. How long a submitted application remains active, when the overall application season begins, and when subsegments of the year conclude are all factors that remain to be worked out.

~Care must be taken to limit what is requested in each application. The point was made that the more that is asked for, the less likely the form is to be accurately and completely filled out.

~Detailed information about the shows needs to be in the system. Such information would be designed to help the artists decide if they should enter a particular show and what they should expect in terms of an experience if they do. Information included should range from sales reports to load-in maps to accommodation options.

~The system could be designed to allow artists to e-mail notices and images about specific shows to their customers and contacts. Such an e-mailing should have the capacity to be segregated by geographic area and other delimiters.

~The application should contain a clear explanation that the requested artist’s statement is a statement about the work presented for jurying, not a general artist’s vision statement.

~Six images and a booth image were deemed adequate for the universal application. Although some shows do not use a booth slide, inclusion of the slide in the universal application was not thought to disadvantage artists.

~The application system must have the capacity to manage artists’ show priorities.

~An attempt should be made to make the general release statement as standard as possible. Understanding that this will be difficult, provisions need to be made to include release statements, or portions of such statements, that can not be standardized. The hope is that at the least, a core release statement could be devised and that differentials could be accommodated thorough the use of popup boxes.

~The statement of originality needs to be retained even though the enforcement of the commitment remains a challenge.

~A number of fair administrators will need a system with the capacity to process a very high volume of applications within a very short period of time.

~In order for the system to be of greatest utility, it must reduce the significant costs of processing applications.

~Application deadlines or master deadlines need to be structured so as not to disadvantage those who apply to multiple shows.

~If application deadlines need to be changed to accommodate a universal application, shows need to start moving in that direction prior to the introduction of the system.

~No one in the group was aware of a deadline study, however all agreed that such a study should be conducted.

~A suggestion was made that all deadlines be allocated into three or four annual periods. In this scenario, all shows would be asked to select the deadline that best met their needs.

~There is general agreement in the field regarding the contents of a universal application. The group noted, however, that devising an online jurying process would likely prove to be much more of a challenge.

Discussion of Online Jurying
Recognizing that the field was not in consensus regarding online jurying, the group discussed some of the factors that needed to be considered when designing such a process.

~The quality of the images placed on the Internet remains a key concern of artists and managers alike. Saunders noted recent and soon-to-be available advances in image quality that will address some of these concerns. He suggested that within a few years, the quality of images on the Internet would likely be high enough to be universally accepted as a medium for jurying.

~When the topic of remote online jurying was discussed, the group voiced three major concerns: a) The possibility exists that persons not part of the jurying process but in the room when the juror reviews images at home or in a place of work could influence the juror. b) When in a group, juror conversation can enrich and often improve the outcome of the jurying process-this is not available through an online, remote process. c) Fair management can learn a great deal about the artists and their art by directly observing the work of the jury. Such a process also allows the fair director to be more effective in public relations and publicity efforts.

~Because artists do not send the same suite of images to all shows, there is a need to design a process that allows adjustments to the image mix submitted to each show. If the jurying moved to an online format, one strategy that was recommended was the submission of a universe of slides to the application site and the designation of specific slides for submission to specific shows. Saunders suggested that the program be set up so that artist users have passwords that allow them to return to the site and make changes to the pool of slides and the designation of images for specific shows.

~How artists feel about on-line jurying is an important consideration. If they are not comfortable they may avoid shows that use the system.

~A suggestion was made that, until Internet image quality is sufficient for use throughout the jurying process, the online process could be used to select finalists whose works would then be juried via slide or though enhanced electronic means that are as good as or better than a slide image.

~The issue of the ability of artists to manipulate slides to their advantage was discussed. Although the group voiced concern about this possibility, the point was made that the ability to manipulate slides through electronic and other means already exists. Further discussion about this possibility was considered advisable, however, many thought the possibility for abuse in this area would grow no matter what method was used for image presentation.

~Because some fairs use multiple jurys, any electronic system must have the capacity to service such a system.

~A way must be found to ensure that online jurors select artwork that reflects regional character and the taste of the public visiting certain shows.

~Issues of confidentiality in the jurying process need to be made explicit and accommodated in an online system and its administration. Such confidentiality needs to be maintained both between shows and among artists.

What does WESTAF Get out of the Project?
In response to a question regarding what WESTAF gets out of the project Radich listed the following:

~The project has the potential to expand the reach and use of ArtistsRegister.com.

~WESTAF is committed to developing infrastructure for the nonprofit arts organizations that introduces efficiencies and builds the net revenues of those organizations.

~WESTAF is working with public arts interests in the area of online jurying. The jurying aspect of this art fairs project is of interest as a way to gain additional experience in the area of the dynamics of jurying.

Concluding Comments
~The Visual Arts Affinity Group has helped shows feel more comfortable about sharing and cooperating. This has helped establish a positive environment for the design and acceptance of a universal application.

~Artist and show management communication has improved in recent years and this has made the design and use of a universal application more feasible.

~The ArtShowJury.com project is a commercial venture that needs to be communicated with prior to the development of an online jurying system.

~The manner in which the application process can be managed and funded remains an open question. WESTAF is willing to take some steps toward the development of the application but needs to identify approximately $25,000 in hard costs in order to complete the project.

~In the long term, WESTAF would like art fairs to consider encouraging artists to use the ArtistsRegister.com project whether for jurying or another means.

~WESTAF believes that its substantial investment in extant online sites can save art fairs substantial money in the work to design and implement a universal application.

2004 DIRECTOR CONFERENCE REGISTRATION

Thank you for registering for the 2004 NAIA Director Conference!

We are happy to offer secure, encrypted on-line registration with your Visa or MasterCard (only.)

NAIA Contributing Member
$225

 

Non-member
$295

To add a discounted “companion registration”, click on “Continue Shopping” after placing regular registration order above. You will be returned to this page where you can add the companion registration order below. (Regular order must be placed first.)

NAIA Member Companion
$150

 

Non-member Companion
$220

 

2004 NAIA Artist Conference

Bob at or you can reach any of us by using our name followed by naia-artists.org

Rick

PS. The NAIA Board has requested that the Artist Conference Committee start
preparing for the 2005 AC. So if ideas don’t fit the 2004 agenda they may be
perfect for the following year.

TENTATIVE AGENDA as of February 1, 2004
Day 1 Wednesday, February 18
8:00 Registration & Coffee
9:00 9:30 Welcome Attendees
9:30 10:30 The Joy of Independence” by artist/curator/educator Bruce Helander
10:30 10:45 Break
10:45 12:00 On-line Application Presentation by WESTAF
12:00 1:00 Lunch
1:00 2:00 Art Fair Directors Panel Interactive Session
2:00 3:30 Artist Legal Issues Lawyers for the Arts attorney Lisa Kincheloe returns to share her witty, relevant wisdom.
3:30 3:45 Break
3:45 4:45 “The Joy of Being an Artist” Presentations by 3 member artists about their lives and work.
4:45 5:00 Silent Auction of Donated Art
5:00 ? Happy Hour in the hotel lounge
Day 2 Thursday, February 19
8:00 9:00 Breakfast & NAIA Annual Meeting Will include opportunities to address the NAIA Board.
9:00 11:00 “Slaying the Digital Dragon The Important Stuff You Need to Know to Deal with Digital Imaging” in-depth presentation by digital photographer Wayne Torborg with time for answers to your questions.
11:00 11:15 Break
11:15 12:00 “Ka Ching 2004” an overview by Frank Berman of the new credit card processing options.
12:00 1:00 Lunch
1:00 2:00 “Surviving the IRS Audit” Insights from members who have lived to tell the tale.
2:00 2:15 “What Not to Do At The Art Fair” a humorous review of some basics by Sally J. Bright
2:15 2:30 Break
2:30 4:45 Mock Slide Jury
4:45 5:00 Open Agenda

SHOW RANKINGS BY CATEGORY

In our continuing efforts to assemble and communicate information about artists and the shows in which they participate we have completed the tabulation on the 1998 Artists Survey. This was the first year we sent the survey to only NAIA members. Even though the number of surveys sent out was smaller than in previous years, we received the largest number of returned surveys. It is hoped that the reason for this is that NAIA efforts are beginning to have an impact and that artists see their input as necessary for these efforts. The results show that although our members participate in art festivals and craft shows, the majority also show their work in galleries and museum and/or university shows, the more conventional routes for fine work.

In addition, the respondents voiced concerns about the art festival industry. As in a previous survey, a large number mentioned the greatest threat to the industry as too many mediocre and low quality shows diluting the business. Beyond this, deceptive practices and the inability of shows to deal effectively with them were of paramount concern. The major suggestions to remedy the situation were (1) Photo ID at check-in and (2) for shows to have a trained committee to check artists booths against their slides on a daily basis. A large majority of respondents was willing to report to the show staff or committee, but some mentioned that since there was no standardized way of addressing these problems reporting was frequently futile.

The category of rule enforcement was the ranking most frequently left blank. It is hard to tell unless the problem and the shows enforcement mechanism (or lack thereof) are close enough to be observed. However, we have included the tabulation of the scores in this category because it is such an important issue at this time As to the improvements that artists have seen in the past five years, the most frequently mentioned was that shows are beginning to pay attention to the needs and advice of artists, largely because of NAIA efforts. Artists also frequently mention that show organizers are increasingly treating artists as professionals and that competition to get into good shows has resulted in higher quality exhibitors.

This year, as in previous years, the most frequently mentioned issue that artists would like the NAIA to address is that of booth fees due upon acceptance rather than to have them sent with the application. Other issues noted as important for our organization to address were: the problems of production studios or manufactured work vs. that made by an individual artist; originals vs. reproductions; and artists reps. As in last years survey, the shows that scored highest in both quality of exhibition and sales are American Craft Expo, Ann Arbor Street Art Fair, Cherry Creek, Smithsonian Craft, Philadelphia Craft Show, and St. Louis Art Fair. These shows have all the ingredients necessary to produce an outstanding event; good location, strong community base of support, good jury procedures and outstanding promotional efforts.

QUALITY OF EXHIBITION
How good was the work overall?
PROMOTION
How much?
  1. American Craft Expo 9.83
  2. Philadelphia Craft 9.64
  3. Smithsonian Craft 9.43
  4. Milwaukee Lakefront 9.12
  5. Ann Arbor Street Art Fair 9.11
  6. Cherry Creek 9.05
  7. St. Louis Art Fair 8.97
  8. Washington Craft Show 8.89
  9. Winter Park 8.75
  10. Paradise City Fall Northampton 8.7
  11. St. Paul ACE 8.5
  12. Portland Art Fair 8.44
  13. Kansas City Plaza 8.27
  14. Sausalito 8.06
  15. Naples Festival of Art FL 8.0
  16. Bruce Museum Fine Art 8.0
  17. Atlanta ACE 8.0
  18. Coconut Grove 7.95
  19. Old Town – Chicago 7.91
  20. Cain Park 7.89
  21. Baltimore ACE 7.82
  22. Gasparilla – Tampa 7.71
  23. Festival of Masters – Disney 7.71
  24. Boston Mills 7.64
  25. Laumeier – St. Louis 7.6
  26. Long’s Park 7.56
  27. Armonk NY 7.5
  28. Des Moines Art Festival 7.42
  29. Port Clinton – Highland Pk 7.38
  30. TACA Nashville 7.33
  31. N. VA Fine Arts Fest – Reston 7.12
  32. Oklahoma City – Spring 7.08
  33. Magic City – Birmingham AL 7.08
  34. Columbus – Summer 7.08
  35. Greater Gulf Coast Pensacola 7.07
  36. Arts & Apples – Rochester 7.07
  37. Memphis Art Festival 6.86
  38. Mt. Dora FL 6.82
  39. Beaux Art 6.77
  40. Scottsdale AZ Art Festival 6.75
  41. Ann Arbor State Street 6.69
  42. Sun Valley 6.67
  43. State College – Penn State 6.67
  44. 57th Street – Chicago 6.64
  45. Main St. Ft. Worth 6.38
  46. Boca Raton -Crocker Center 6.35
  47. Park City UT 6.33
  48. B’ham MI Art in the Park -May 6.24
  49. Jazz Fest – New Orleans 6.17
  50. Ann Arbor Summer – Mich. Guild 6.1
  51. Winterfair – Columbus ODC 6
  52. Madison – On the Square 5.95
  53. Virginia Beach Boardwalk 5.88
  54. Brookside – Kansas City 5.88
  55. Laguna Gloria Fiesta 5.86
  56. Artigras – W. Palm Beach 5.67
  57. Pacific NW Arts Fair (Nov) 5.57
  58. Las Olas Museum 5.55
  59. Uptown MN 5.42
  60. Dallas Artfest 5.29
  61. Bayou City Houston Fall 4.9
  62. St. James Ct. Louisville 4.5
  63. Sugarloaf – Gaithersberg MD 4.22
  1. Cherry Creek 9.84
  2. Philadelphia Craft 9.73
  3. St. Louis Art Fair 9.29
  4. Smithsonian Craft 9.29
  5. Paradise City Fall N’Hampton 9.2
  6. Ann Arbor Summer – Mich. Guild 9.0
  7. American Craft Expo 8.83
  8. Portland Art Fair 8.75
  9. Ann Arbor Street Art Fair 8.75
  10. Coconut Grove 8.64
  11. Winter Park 8.6
  12. Oklahoma City – Spring 8.58
  13. Milwaukee Lakefront 8.5
  14. Des Moines Art Festival 8.39
  15. Jazz Fest – New Orleans 8.33
  16. Baltimore ACE 8.27
  17. Port Clinton – Highland Pk 8.19
  18. Sausalito 8.18
  19. Kansas City Plaza 8.07
  20. Sugarloaf – Gaitherberg MD 8
  21. State College – Penn State 7.83
  22. Greater Gulf Coast Pensacola 7.83
  23. Columbus – Summer 7.8
  24. Ann Arbor State Street 7.75
  25. Arts & Apples – Rochester 7.64
  26. Pacific NW Arts Fair (Nov) 7.57
  27. St. Paul ACE 7.56
  28. Main St. Ft. Worth 7.5
  29. Washington Craft Show 7.33
  30. Boston Mills 7.24
  31. Festival of Masters – Disney 7.19
  32. Cain Park 7.18
  33. Virginia Beach Boardwalk 7.17
  34. Park City UT 7.17
  35. Naples Festival of Art FL 7.14
  36. No. VA Fine Arts Fest – Reston 7.07
  37. Magic City – Birmingham AL 7.0
  38. Atlanta ACE 7.0
  39. Artigras – W. Palm Beach 6.82
  40. Mt. Dora FL 6.73
  41. Madison – On the Square 6.72
  42. B’ham MI Art in the Park -May 6.7
  43. Long’s Park 6.69
  44. Old Town – Chicago 6.65
  45. Uptown MN 6.61
  46. Sun Valley 6.6
  47. Winterfair – Columbus ODC 6.43
  48. Gasparilla – Tampa 6.43
  49. St. James Ct. Louisville 6.31
  50. Scottsdale AZ Art Festival 6.3
  51. Beaux Art 6.15
  52. Memphis Art Festival 6.14
  53. TACA Nashville 6
  54. Bayou City Houston Fall 6
  55. Armonk NY 6
  56. Laumeier – St. Louis 5.9
  57. Bruce Museum Fine Art 5.8
  58. Laguna Gloria Fiesta 5.71
  59. Dallas Artfest 5.57
  60. Las Olas Museum 5.55
  61. 57th Street – Chicago 5.41
  62. Brookside – Kansas City 4.63
  63. Boca Raton -Crocker Center 4.15
HOSPITALITY
Lots of friendly volunteers?
Artist’s rest areas? Amenities?
Good party?
SECURITY
Was it evident before and after show hours?
Was your van secure?
  1. Cain Park 9.56
  2. Cherry Creek 9.51
  3. St. Louis Art Fair 9.23
  4. Philadelphia Craft 9.09
  5. Portland Art Fair 9
  6. Long’s Park 8.94
  7. Des Moines Art Festival 8.77
  8. Magic City – Birmingham AL 8.67
  9. Bruce Museum Fine Art 8.5
  10. Paradise City Fall N’Hampton 8.5
  11. Milwaukee Lakefront 8.38
  12. Smithsonian Craft 8.29
  13. Oklahoma City – Spring 8.25
  14. TACA Nashville 8.25
  15. Atlanta ACE 8
  16. Sausalito 7.94
  17. Winter Park 7.69
  18. Coconut Grove 7.56
  19. Port Clinton – Highland Pk 7.5
  20. Ann Arbor Street Art Fair 7.47
  21. American Craft Expo 7.33
  22. Jazz Fest – New Orleans 7.33
  23. Kansas City Plaza 7.31
  24. No. VA Fine Arts Fest – Reston 7.24
  25. Main St. Ft. Worth 7.13
  26. Columbus – Summer 7.12
  27. State College – Penn State 7
  28. Gasparilla – Tampa 6.95
  29. Beaux Art 6.92
  30. Greater Gulf Coast Pensacola 6.92
  31. Washington Craft Show 6.89
  32. Arts & Apples – Rochester 6.86
  33. Laguna Gloria Fiesta 6.86
  34. B’ham MI Art in the Park -May 6.76
  35. Old Town – Chicago 6.61
  36. Memphis Art Festival 6.57
  37. Festival of Masters – Disney 6.53
  38. Boston Mills 6.44
  39. Scottsdale AZ Art Festival 6.42
  40. St. Paul ACE 6.4
  41. Ann Arbor State Street 6.34
  42. Madison – On the Square 6.25
  43. Las Olas Museum 6.18
  44. Sun Valley 6.17
  45. Park City UT 5.83
  46. Artigras – W. Palm Beach 5.75
  47. Mt. Dora FL 5.73
  48. St. James Ct. Louisville 5.71
  49. Winterfair – Columbus ODC 5.57
  50. Armonk NY 5.5
  51. Bayou City Houston Fall 5.5
  52. Virginia Beach Boardwalk 5.5
  53. 57th Street – Chicago 5.47
  54. Laumeier – St. Louis 5.3
  55. Baltimore ACE 5.27
  56. Naples Festival of Art FL 5.27
  57. Uptown MN 5.16
  58. Ann Arbor Summer – Mich. Guild 5.11
  59. Brookside – Kansas City 5
  60. Sugarloaf – Gaitherberg MD 4.89
  61. Boca Raton -Crocker Center 4.5
  62. Pacific NW Arts Fair (Nov) 4.29
  63. Dallas Artfest 2.43
  1. Smithsonian Craft 9.86
  2. American Craft Expo 9.67
  3. Festival of Masters – Disney 9.31
  4. St. Paul ACE 9.3
  5. Philadelphia Craft 9.18
  6. Boston Mills 9.04
  7. Armonk NY 9
  8. Atlanta ACE 9
  9. Cain Park 9
  10. Cherry Creek 9
  11. Paradise City Fall N’Hampton 9
  12. Sausalito 8.94
  13. Baltimore ACE 8.91
  14. Winterfair – Columbus ODC 8.86
  15. St. Louis Art Fair 8.84
  16. Long’s Park 8.75
  17. Milwaukee Lakefront 8.73
  18. Arts & Apples – Rochester 8.71
  19. Laguna Gloria Fiesta 8.71
  20. Bruce Museum Fine Art 8.67
  21. Portland Art Fair 8.38
  22. Oklahoma City – Spring 8.33
  23. Des Moines Art Festival 8.28
  24. TACA Nashville 8.17
  25. Sugarloaf – Gaitherberg MD 8.11
  26. Laumeier – St. Louis 8.1
  27. Winter Park 8.06
  28. Jazz Fest – New Orleans 8
  29. Kansas City Plaza 8
  30. Washington Craft Show 8
  31. Port Clinton – Highland Pk 7.96
  32. Greater Gulf Coast Pensacola 7.85
  33. Artigras – W. Palm Beach 7.73
  34. Memphis Art Festival 7.71
  35. Gasparilla – Tampa 7.5
  36. Scottsdale AZ Art Festival 7.5
  37. Sun Valley 7.5
  38. Bayou City Houston Fall 7.5
  39. St. James Ct. Louisville 7.46
  40. B’ham MI Art in the Park -May 7.42
  41. Magic City – Birmingham AL 7.36
  42. Naples Festival of Art FL 7.14
  43. Madison – On the Square 7.11
  44. Mt. Dora FL 7.09
  45. No. VA Fine Arts Fest – Reston 7.06
  46. Ann Arbor Street Art Fair 6.98
  47. Coconut Grove 6.93
  48. Las Olas Museum 6.9
  49. Columbus – Summer 6.88
  50. Main St. Ft. Worth 6.88
  51. Brookside – Kansas City 6.86
  52. Ann Arbor Summer – Mich. Guild 6.8
  53. Dallas Artfest 6.57
  54. Boca Raton -Crocker Center 6.55
  55. Pacific NW Arts Fair (Nov) 6.43
  56. 57th Street – Chicago 6
  57. Ann Arbor State Street 5.93
  58. Old Town – Chicago 5.86
  59. Beaux Art 5.67
  60. Park City UT 5.6
  61. State College – Penn State 5.5
  62. Uptown MN 4.77
  63. Virginia Beach Boardwalk 3.25
ENFORCEMENT OF RULES
Did the show do a good job
enforcing their rules?
COMMUNICATION
Consider the prospectus?
Other info?
  1. Atlanta ACE 9
  2. Ann Arbor Summer – Mich. Guild 8.7
  3. Festival of Masters – Disney 8.5
  4. St. Louis Art Fair 8.5
  5. Milwaukee Lakefront 8.45
  6. Ann Arbor Street Art Fair 8.38
  7. Winter Park 8.24
  8. Paradise City Fall Northampton 8.17
  9. Smithsonian Craft 8.14
  10. Cherry Creek 8.11
  11. TACA Nashville 8
  12. Cain Park 7.94
  13. Oklahoma City – Spring 7.91
  14. Philadelphia Craft 7.9
  15. Washington Craft Show 7.88
  16. Portland Art Fair 7.75
  17. Armonk NY 7.67
  18. Bruce Museum Fine Art 7.6
  19. Old Town – Chicago 7.52
  20. Des Moines Art Festival 7.5
  21. St. Paul ACE 7.5
  22. Port Clinton – Highland Pk 7.39
  23. Boston Mills 7.36
  24. Long’s Park 7.36
  25. Kansas City Plaza 7.13
  26. State College – Penn State 7.08
  27. B’ham MI Art in the Park -May 6.93
  28. Arts & Apples – Rochester 6.86
  29. Jazz Fest – New Orleans 6.83
  30. Baltimore ACE 6.82
  31. Winterfair – Columbus ODC 6.8
  32. Magic City – Birmingham AL 6.78
  33. Naples Festival of Art FL 6.77
  34. American Craft Expo 6.67
  35. Scottsdale AZ Art Festival 6.67
  36. Virginia Beach Boardwalk 6.63
  37. Sausalito 6.57
  38. Memphis Art Festival 6.5
  39. Coconut Grove 6.49
  40. N. VA Fine Arts Fest – Reston 6.43
  41. Columbus – Summer 6.42
  42. 57th Street – Chicago 6.25
  43. Gasparilla – Tampa 6.18
  44. Ann Arbor State Street 6.12
  45. Madison – On the Square 6.05
  46. Laumeier – St. Louis 6
  47. Las Olas Museum 5.8
  48. Laguna Gloria Fiesta 5.71
  49. Beaux Art 5.7
  50. Sun Valley 5.67
  51. Mt. Dora FL 5.64
  52. Brookside – Kansas City 5.57
  53. Main St. Ft. Worth 5.57
  54. Artigras – W. Palm Beach 5.4
  55. Park City UT 5.2
  56. Sugarloaf – Gaitherberg MD 5
  57. Boca Raton -Crocker Center 4.89
  58. St. James Ct. Louisville 4.85
  59. Greater Gulf Coast Pensacola 4.67
  60. Pacific NW Arts Fair (Nov) 4.67
  61. Uptown MN 4.58
  62. Dallas Artfest 4.5
  63. Bayou City Houston Fall 3.89
  1. Philadelphia Craft 9.45
  2. Cherry Creek 9.31
  3. St. Louis Art Fair 9.26
  4. Baltimore ACE 9.09
  5. Smithsonian Craft 9
  6. Cain Park 9
  7. Atlanta ACE 9
  8. American Craft Expo 9
  9. TACA Nashville 8.92
  10. Portland Art Fair 8.67
  11. Milwaukee Lakefront 8.54
  12. Winter Park 8.31
  13. Ann Arbor Street Art Fair 8.3
  14. Festival of Masters – Disney 8.29
  15. Long’s Park 8.25
  16. Oklahoma City – Spring 8.17
  17. Des Moines Art Festival 8.13
  18. Washington Craft Show 8.11
  19. St. Paul ACE 8.1
  20. Paradise City Fall N’Hampton 8.1
  21. Ann Arbor Summer – Mich. Guild 8.1
  22. State College – Penn State 8
  23. Arts & Apples – Rochester 8
  24. Coconut Grove 7.96
  25. N. VA Fine Arts Fest – Reston 7.94
  26. Columbus – Summer 7.8
  27. Port Clinton – Highland Pk 7.77
  28. Winterfair – Columbus ODC 7.71
  29. Bruce Museum Fine Art 7.67
  30. Kansas City Plaza 7.64
  31. Boston Mills 7.56
  32. Jazz Fest – New Orleans 7.33
  33. Armonk NY 7.33
  34. Greater Gulf Coast Pensacola 7.29
  35. Ann Arbor State Street 7.24
  36. Beaux Art 7.15
  37. Sun Valley 7
  38. Laumeier – St. Louis 7
  39. Gasparilla – Tampa 7
  40. Old Town – Chicago 6.95
  41. B’ham MI Art in the Park -May 6.95
  42. Scottsdale AZ Art Festival 6.92
  43. Magic City – Birmingham AL 6.92
  44. Bayou City Houston Fall 6.9
  45. Main St. Ft. Worth 6.88
  46. Artigras – W. Palm Beach 6.83
  47. Sausalito 6.78
  48. Madison – On the Square 6.65
  49. Naples Festival of Art FL 6.6
  50. Memphis Art Festival 6.57
  51. Laguna Gloria Fiesta 6.57
  52. Sugarloaf – Gaitherberg MD 6.33
  53. Mt. Dora FL 6.18
  54. Boca Raton -Crocker Center 6.05
  55. Las Olas Museum 6
  56. St. James Ct. Louisville 5.57
  57. Uptown MN 5.52
  58. Virginia Beach Boardwalk 5.5
  59. Park City UT 5.5
  60. 57th Street – Chicago 5.44
  61. Brookside – Kansas City 5.13
  62. Pacific NW Arts Fair (Nov) 5
  63. Dallas Artfest 4.14
FOOD
Who might it attract? Was it good?
Upscale? Easy to get?
ACCESS
Load-in, load-out, parking, early setup?
  1. Jazz Fest – New Orleans 9.83
  2. St. Louis Art Fair 8.97
  3. Cherry Creek 8.72
  4. Oklahoma City – Spring 8.5
  5. Paradise City Fall N’Hampton 8.4
  6. Cain Park 8.11
  7. Philadelphia Craft 7.91
  8. Memphis Art Festival 7.86
  9. Long’s Park 7.67
  10. Coconut Grove 7.6
  11. Kansas City Plaza 7.36
  12. Des Moines Art Festival 6.87
  13. Portland Art Fair 6.83
  14. Sausalito 6.82
  15. Columbus – Summer 6.79
  16. Sugarloaf – Gaitherberg MD 6.78
  17. N. VA Fine Arts Fest – Reston 6.73
  18. Ann Arbor Summer – Mich. Guild 6.71
  19. Ann Arbor Street Art Fair 6.7
  20. Beaux Art 6.6
  21. Winter Park 6.5
  22. Arts & Apples – Rochester 6.43
  23. Gasparilla – Tampa 6.41
  24. Port Clinton – Highland Pk 6.28
  25. American Craft Expo 6
  26. Milwaukee Lakefront 6
  27. Mt. Dora FL 5.91
  28. Washington Craft Show 5.89
  29. Laguna Gloria Fiesta 5.86
  30. Park City UT 5.83
  31. Smithsonian Craft 5.83
  32. State College – Penn State 5.82
  33. Las Olas Museum 5.78
  34. Madison – On the Square 5.74
  35. Old Town – Chicago 5.74
  36. Bruce Museum Fine Art 5.67
  37. Greater Gulf Coast Pensacola 5.64
  38. TACA Nashville 5.5
  39. B’ham MI Art in the Park -May 5.48
  40. Main St. Ft. Worth 5.38
  41. Festival of Masters – Disney 5.33
  42. Scottsdale AZ Art Festival 5.33
  43. Boca Raton -Crocker Center 5.31
  44. Ann Arbor State Street 5.19
  45. Virginia Beach Boardwalk 5.14
  46. Uptown MN 5.03
  47. Atlanta ACE 5
  48. Magic City – Birmingham AL 4.88
  49. 57th Street – Chicago 4.82
  50. Artigras – W. Palm Beach 4.82
  51. St. James Ct. Louisville 4.69
  52. Naples Festival of Art FL 4.67
  53. Armonk NY 4.6
  54. Laumeier – St. Louis 4.56
  55. Boston Mills 4.38
  56. Pacific NW Arts Fair (Nov) 4.29
  57. Winterfair – Columbus ODC 4.29
  58. Bayou City Houston Fall 4.25
  59. St. Paul ACE 4.2
  60. Sun Valley 4
  61. Baltimore ACE 3.55
  62. Brookside – Kansas City 3.14
  63. Dallas Artfest 2.14
  1. Milwaukee Lakefront 9.42
  2. Cherry Creek 9.27
  3. TACA Nashville 9.08
  4. Long’s Park 8.81
  5. Cain Park 8.72
  6. Des Moines Art Festival 8.63
  7. St. Louis Art Fair 8.35
  8. N. VA Fine Arts Fest – Reston 8.35
  9. Smithsonian Craft 8.29
  10. Arts & Apples – Rochester 8.29
  11. Portland Art Fair 8.22
  12. Philadelphia Craft 8.09
  13. Atlanta ACE 8
  14. Washington Craft Show 7.89
  15. State College – Penn State 7.83
  16. Armonk NY 7.83
  17. Baltimore ACE 7.82
  18. Coconut Grove 7.69
  19. Oklahoma City – Spring 7.67
  20. St. Paul ACE 7.6
  21. Gasparilla – Tampa 7.57
  22. Sun Valley 7.5
  23. Bruce Museum Fine Art 7.5
  24. Kansas City Plaza 7.46
  25. Dallas Artfest 7.43
  26. Ann Arbor Street Art Fair 7.41
  27. Birmingham MI Art in the Park -May 7.19
  28. Jazz Fest – New Orleans 7.17
  29. Paradise City Fall N’Hampton 7.1
  30. Ann Arbor State Street 7.03
  31. Winter Park 6.97
  32. American Craft Expo 6.83
  33. Boca Raton -Crocker Center 6.75
  34. Laumeier – St. Louis 6.6
  35. Artigras – W. Palm Beach 6.58
  36. Columbus – Summer 6.44
  37. Ann Arbor Summer – Mich. Guild 6.4
  38. Beaux Art 6.38
  39. Naples Festival of Art FL 6.27
  40. Bayou City Houston Fall 6.2
  41. Greater Gulf Coast Pensacola 6.14
  42. Sugarloaf – Gaitherberg MD 6
  43. 57th Street – Chicago 5.89
  44. Mt. Dora FL 5.82
  45. Madison – On the Square 5.7
  46. Sausalito 5.61
  47. Las Olas Museum 5.55
  48. Scottsdale AZ Art Festival 5.5
  49. Pacific NW Arts Fair (Nov) 5.29
  50. Winterfair – Columbus ODC 5.14
  51. Laguna Gloria Fiesta 5.14
  52. Port Clinton – Highland Pk 5.12
  53. Uptown MN 5
  54. Memphis Art Festival 5
  55. Brookside – Kansas City 5
  56. Old Town – Chicago 4.89
  57. Festival of Masters – Disney 4.53
  58. St. James Ct. Louisville 4.36
  59. Magic City – Birmingham AL 4.33
  60. Boston Mills 4.32
  61. Main St. Ft. Worth 4.25
  62. Park City UT 4
  63. Virginia Beach Boardwalk 3.88

REPORT ON THE NAIA SURVEY: “TRENDS AMONG ARTISTS: THE CHANGING ARTISTIC LANDSCAPE”

A STUDY ABOUT THE EXHIBITOR AND THE MARKETPLACE

Presented by Richard Carner and Sarah Rishel

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank the National Association of Independent Artists, which allowed us unbridled access to any and all of the resources that made this study possible. If the National Association of Independent Artists did not exist as the primary representative of artists/craftspeople that make a living by exhibiting their work at art and craft shows, it is problematic whether or not this study would have come into existence.

Particular recognition is directed toward Ardath Prendergast, former Executive Director of the National Association of Independent Artists. Taking important time away from other responsibilities, she offered invaluable editing suggestions.

Sally Bright, Chair of the Board of the National Association of Independent Artists stood steadfastly by as this document made its way through some twenty versions. Sally also offered critical suggestions regarding the organization of data as well as editorial support.

Finally, we want to thank John Malone, an author who has written numerous books in the fields of American history, the history of science, and the arts. He graciously lent his expertise and guidance to this project.

Richard Carner and Sarah Rishel

March 10, 2008

Posterity may know we have not loosely through
silence permitted things to pass away as in a dream.

Richard Hooker 1554-1600

Introduction

For several years now, people who make a living by exhibiting their work at art and craft shows have expressed concerns about the market place. Preeminent in any discussion are declining sales and rising costs. Over the years other problems with the shows have been identified. The National Association of Independent Artists (NAIA) has addressed many of these issues through the development of a series of Advocacies a sort of Bill of Rights and distributed these Advocacies to hundreds of shows throughout the country. These advocacies deal with everything from cancellation and refund policies, to proxies, rule enforcement, and security. Many of these shows have now adopted some or all of these Advocacies.

However, problems do not simply vanish because a coalition of exhibitors insists on being treated in a certain way and some shows begin to comply. Many exhibitors express the uneasy feeling that the art show marketplace is in a state of disarray. On any given weekend conversations pop up between exhibitors at the shows, on internet forums dedicated to artist/craftspeople, and in trade publications that provide information about the shows. There is a perception amongst exhibitors that all shows, whether they are considered to be so-called top ranked events or those that fall into the middle of some ranking scheme, are not performing like they used to. Robust sales and a decent profit margin appear to be increasingly problematic. Another concern frequently heard is that profit margins are being squeezed by rising costs. As well, with increasing frequency complaints are expressed not only about the vagaries of the art/craft show market place, but about uncertainties related to getting accepted into shows. Some exhibitors are concerned that they are ending up on the sidelines due to the influx of buy-sell and/or highly derivative work, which is produced in other parts of the world.

Research Methodology

The National Associaion of Independent Artists resolved that it was time to move beyond talk on the street and conduct a systematic study of exhibitors attitudes with respect to trends and the marketplace. In 2007 the NAIA Survey Committee constructed a comprehensive survey titled: Trends Among Artists: The Changing Artistic Landscape comprised of 67 questions dedicated to gathering the following information from exhibitors:

Demographic (including Educational)
Economic
Health
Perceptions about the Show Marketplace
Future Plans

The Survey Committee utilized a description research design as outlined by Issac and Michaels in the Handbook in Research and Evaluation, who state that a survey type approach can be used in order to:

1. Collect detailed factual information that describes existing phenomena.
2. Make comparisons and evaluations.
3. Identify problems or justify current conditions and practices.
4. Determine what others are doing with similar problems or situations.
5. Benefit from their experience in making future plans and decisions.

Distribution

An announcement about this online survey was made in several trade publications, in a newspaper put out by the NAIA that was distributed at dozens of shows throughout the country, through mass e-mail, and on the NAIA forum. The committee responsible for this assignment settled on an online survey-type approach to gathering the data. Membership in the NAIA was not a stipulation for participation in this survey. Participants were not required to provide their names. It was thought that anonymity would lead to more forthright responses, particularly in the areas which had to do with health issues and finances.

Interest in this survey was reflected in the fact that nearly 550 people participated in it. This represented a 365% increase in the number of respondents over any other survey that the NAIA has conducted.

This report represents an extended and much more thorough analysis of the data that was presented to over 50 show directors at the 2007 Directors Conference which was held in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. That report was titled, Exhibitors, Art, & the Changing Landscape.

Trends that Emerged from the Data

In examining the data the following three major trends were seen to emerge:

  1. Vanishing Resource #1: The Artist/Craftsperson
  2. Vanishing Resource #2: The Customer Interest in American Art & Craft
  3. A Trend Back to Exhibiting in Local Shows

Here is a brief analysis of the data that supports these trend observations.

1. Vanishing Resource #1: The Artist/Craftsperson

This survey found that art show exhibitors are an aging population. Of all respondents, 82% are over the age of 46 while 14% are over the age of 62. No one filled out this survey that was under the age of 25, and only 4% of the responses came from people who were between the age of 26 & 35. Age as an issue is clearly demonstrated in the fact that 77% of the respondents no longer have dependent children.

2. Vanishing Resource #2: The Customer Interest in American Art & Craft

The perception that the customer is no longer attending art/craft shows in the numbers of yesteryear had an impact on the way exhibitors responded to questions related to economics, debt load, and future plans.

When asked what age bracket their work sells to, 31% say the 33 to 45 year old bracket, while 63% report that the 46 to 59 year old bracket buys their work. Only 4% of respondents said that their work was appealing to people over the age of 60.

The obvious conclusion is that if a preponderance of the crowd is over the age of 60, sales will suffer accordingly.

Regarding the buying habits of those in the age brackets listed above, 58% see a change in the crowd attending art/craft shows, while 42% see no change. Of those who believe the crowd has changed, 76% report that they saw it coming on 5 years ago, while 24% recognized it going back at least 10 years. There is a significant relationship (74%) between those who are convinced that the population attending art/craft shows has changed and sales. This group believes that sales have been negatively impacted.

When asked to describe this change in greater detail, 46% say that the number one motivation for people coming to the shows is for every reason except that of purchasing artwork. Other very strong response indicators were that the crowd is older and/or the crowd does not seem to be as interested in American art and craft.

Whether or not exhibitors agree that a change has occurred in the crowd that attends art/craft shows, or that any change that has occurred has negatively impacted sales: 52% of all respondents state that net income in the past 3 years has declined. 26% report an increase, while net income for 21% has remained about the same.

Of those who affirmed that shows are in a state of decline, the opinions varied. However, several reasons stood out from the pack. The number one reason given was that there are simply too many shows. Second on the list was the belief that many show directors either do not understand or care enough to understand how to market and promote authentic American art & craft.

Several other issues which ranked high were the infusion of buy/sell products into the art shows market place and the decline in public interest in genuine American Art and Craft. Another line of concern had to do with the disappearing pool of purported collectors. The varied responses to this question suggest that pinning down the reasons for problems in the market place remains a moving target.

3. A Trend Back to Exhibiting in Local Shows

There seems to be a sea change with respect to decisions about how and where exhibitors will market their work. How was this trend extracted from the data?

41% of all shows attended by exhibitors are less than 60 miles from home base. 16% of all shows are between 60 280 miles from home, while only 15% of all shows are more than 280 miles away from home.

It appears that many shows are on a short tether in as much as only 26% of respondents are committed to doing shows that were once reliable but in the past several years have been on the decline. Very few exhibitors (14%) do shows primarily because they enjoy traveling and sight seeing. 43% state that they can no longer afford to apply to shows which are not profitable either because of disappointing sales and/or rising costs. A scant 17% report that they are comfortable returning to a show that varies in profitability from year to year. In aggregate, these responses suggest that loyalty to and constancy with specific shows is weakening.

Other more subjective reasons reflect on the uncertainty exhibitors have regarding future travel plans. Only 20% of respondents state that they are more optimistic about making a living doing art shows then they were three years ago while 50% are less optimistic.

In addition, 29% of all exhibitors state that in the last 3 years health issues are an important factor with respect to how many shows one does and how far one is willing to travel in order to do a show. Significantly, 40% of all repondents are moving toward doing fewer shows annually.

Conclusions

The results of this survey based on the perceptions of nearly 550 artists/craftspeople indicate that the art show industry is in a state of flux and that problems began to appear at least five years ago and perhaps were first observed in the mid 1990s. What the data revealed was:

1. Age, Health, & Physical Issues

What is it that can be said about this community of arts show artists with any degree of certainty? It is an aging population.

It should be no surprise that a significant percentage of this group (90%) state that participating in art shows is becoming an increasingly physical challenge. Revealing as well is the fact that 53% still have to do shows by themselves.

This is a population in which a good percentage feels that they have reached a point in life where a shift is occurring from seeing the future in terms of ones potential and beginning to see it in terms of ones limitations.

2. Income and Expenses

Total income derived from art shows is one key to understanding some of the problems artists have been encountering in recent years. 40% of people who responded to this survey stated that art & craft shows represent 75% of total domestic income. An additional 17% declared that between 50% 75% of total domestic income was derived from art shows.

The remaining 42% of respondents rely as much if not more on other sources of revenue in order to make ends meet. 81% of all exhibitors depend on other revenue streams beyond sales from art shows. Sales from galleries and spousal support ranked highest in contributing to household income.

38% of all exhibitors claim that gross sales were less than $25,000 in 2006. And an additional 25% made between $26,000 and $50,000.

In the last 3 years 52% of respondents participating in art shows report that their net income has decreased. 21% say it is about the same, while 26% claim that sales have gone up.

The other key to understanding what many artists are facing also has to do with rising debt load. The two most prevalent reasons debt load has risen in the past 5 years are the cost of doing shows and the commensurate decline in gross sales.

Rising debt load might also be impacting the way people save for the future. With respect to a retirement account, 45% of respondents put money away on a regular basis while 32% do so only sporadically. 24% of exhibitors do not have a retirement account or plan.

3. The Future

When asked to describe whether or not there might be a tipping point where one will be forced to make a change if sales do not get better, 25% say that a decision is imminent or due to come within the next 3 years. 35% of exhibitors said that Honestly, I do not know what to think. The market place is changing and I am trying to figure out what is going on.

With respect to the issue of volatility or uncertainty the question was asked, Are you beginning to develop an alternative plan for making a living in the event that you simply are unable to consistently sell your work at art & craft shows? 32% who answered this question have a specific plan and are in the process of executing it. 30% have several ideas, but no one plan in particular has been selected. 20% declared that they are either avoiding this issue altogether, or do not have a clue what they would do if they actually quit doing art & craft shows.

The tipping point for some artists is evidently related to other issues besides sales, health, and age. When asked about debt load, 47% of respondents state that in the last five years, their debt load has gone up either substantially or moderately. 16% say that incurred debt has only gone up slightly, while 19% report no change. Only 18% report that they have decreased their debt load.

45% of exhibitors report that over 30% of their income goes toward servicing debt load. 33% of this population must utilize 40% of income in order to satisfy debt obligations. Debt load was defined as any combination of mortgages, credit cards, car payments, medical bills, or other outstanding loans.

The increase in debt load in the past five years was mainly attributed to the combination of the rising costs of doing shows, and the decline in net income. Other, less significant issues reported were an up tick in domestic, medical, and personal expenses.

Regarding debt load, this group reports that over the last five years, their reliance on the credit card in order to pay exhibition fees has gone up 71%. The reasons however, vary. 50% report that it is simply a matter of convenience to pay by credit card. The term convenience of course is open to interpretation.

Another 30% of all respondents state that it is a necessity to pay by credit card in as much as the funds are not available in a checking account.

At least the American Dream of home ownership has been realized by this group in that 62% state that they are carrying a mortgage; while 28% own their homes outright. To what degree homeowners are reacting to diminishing sales and rising costs by taking out home equity loans was not targeted in this survey and remains an open question.

Regarding savings, 75% of the respondents report that they have some type of retirement account with 46% claiming that this account was established more than 15 years ago. Of the exhibitors who responded to this survey, 85% have health insurance.

What is less sure due to the limitations of the survey is whether or not a retirement account, health insurance, home ownership, even traveling long distances to do shows would have been possible without spousal help or some other revenue stream. For example, 81% of exhibitors said that they rely on additional income beyond art shows while 27% have either a full-time or a part-time job. 41% rely on spousal help. Clearly, without spousal help many exhibitors would either have to curtail their show itinerary or quit altogether.

Finally, the question was asked, If you have expressed an opinion that there is a waning interest in American art/craft what in your view can be done about the situation? By far and away, the most prevalent response had to do with developing a national marketing campaign in order to educate the population about American Art & Craft. Another solution had to do with organizing an Art Show Director/Artist-Craftsperson summit.

The reasoning appears to be that collective brainstorming might yield a solution about the slumping market and mediocre sales. 28% of respondents indicated that there is a need to entirely revamp the way art/craft is marketed. While 15% felt that nothing can be done because the issues are too complex.

Limitations of this Study

All surveys pose problems with respect to the data. Some surveys attempt to target a single issue in order to isolate and control the questions.

Others, such as this one, applied a modified shotgun approach in order to study the exhibitor population. In the former situation, focusing on single issues can result in conclusions which are short-sighted. Conversely, the problem with taking a shot gun style approach to fact gathering is that the questionnaire may become confusing or lose sight of its objectives. There is the risk that conclusions, which are drawn from the study, will fly off in too many directions. A decision had to be made, and since so little is actually known about the attitudes, situations, and future plans of exhiitors, the authors chose the latter approach.

One problem with this survey was that several of the questions were perhaps awkwardly phrased and some respondents may have passed over them as a result. For the same reason, several questions offered a confusing array of responses that seem to frustrate a small percentage of the participants and these questions were set aside as well. It is estimated that 7% of the questions fit this description.

An important demographic question, which was overlooked, has to do with where a respondent lived. It would have been very helpful to know what percentages of the responses were coming from the West as opposed to the Midwest or East.

This information in turn could have been cross referenced with questions in other categories and the resulting data would have rested on more solid ground. An example of connecting data points would involve looking at respondents that lived in the Midwest with information such as gross income or price point of objects for sale. In short, there is no practicable way of knowing whether the results of this survey are, say, skewed by a preponderance of the responses coming from exhibitors living in the South, or the South and Midwest.

Another problem with this study is that many of the questions ask for an opinion so what is really gathered here are perceptions or opinions about conditions as they are perceived by the respondent. An example of an opinion type question is #53 regarding prospects for making a living doing shows looking forward. 35% of artists who are pessimistic about the marketplace believe that the reason for this is because competition is squeezing them out of the marketplace. In truth, there is no hard fact to support this perception.

An opportunity also was lost when it came to doing a follow up study. It would have been very helpful if a way had been found to do a follow up study say in 5 years – in order to see whether or not the attitudes or intentions of the participants had significantly changed. That opportunity was lost because it was thought respondents might be reluctant to answer in depth questions about debt load and health issues if they had to provide their names.

Finally, a truly scientific approach would have involved the utilization of a statistical test or tests in order to more accurately determine whether or not there were real (mathematical) relationships between various categories that were targeted. The authors had intended originally to use a statistical approach to analyzing the data. The idea was to use something like a Pearson Product Moment Correlation test, however for a number of methodological reasons and time constraints this evaluative approach had to be put aside.

Nevertheless, definite indications do emerge from the data.

Synopsis of Concerns as Indicated by the Survey

Here is a brief review of the major issues which are of concern to the group that participated in this survey:

  1. The erosion of the interest in what is identified as American Art/Craft in light of other influences.
  2. An aging population of prospective buyers and a commensurate loss of dedicated art/craft collectors.
  3. The increase in art/craft shows that have other agendas besides bringing a buying pubic together with quality producers of art/craft.
  4. The melting pot effect of the introduction of art/craft from other cultural sources.
  5. The increasing appearance into the marketplace of buy/sell.
  6. The movement toward the contraction of shows, i.e. shows returning to their roots as local events as artists begin to change their travel itineraries and stay closer to home.
  7. The lack of new younger artist/craftspeople to help reinvigorate the marketplace with new work.
  8. The absence of a new younger population of buyers to supplant the aging population of Baby Boomers who no longer are purchasing art/craft.
  9. An aging population of artists/craftspeople who are, on one level or another, planning exit strategies out of this business due to physical, lifestyle, and economic reasons.

Looking into a Crystal Ball

Although the future can never be known since, by definition it cannot be predicted (Eric Voegelin in The New Science of Politics), a few ruminations regarding the disposition of the art/show marketplace looking forward might not be an entirely futile exercise. What follows are the opinions and thoughts by the authors of this study.

1. Assuming that art/craft, which does not fall into the currently recognizable American craft genre is more than a passing fancy, one might expect to see more shows accepting work from other countries or other cultures into their shows. Many participants in this study believe that it is a fait accompli.

2. A concern expressed by some exhibitors is that the introduction of applied and fine art that does not appear to have a direct connection to what is perceived as authentic American art/craft will simply end up being another nail in the coffin of artists/craftspeople who are already struggling to make ends meet.

This assumption is not substantiated by fact and seems to be based on unknown fears and other subconscious issues. The problem is that no one identifiable factor can be pointed to when it comes to declining sales in the marketplace

3. The contrary view might be that the introduction of new work, which applies different concepts, materials, and techniques, would actually reshape and reinvigorate a marketplace that is seen by a substantial majority of the respondents to this survey as stagnant if not in full decline.

4. Interest or lack thereof in fine and applied art mediums may be related to the consumers fascination with other things such as the electronic gadget industry. For example, PC World magazine was giddy with expectations leading up to the 2008 MacWorld Expo. Descriptions like, Theres something in the air anticipated Steve Jobs keynote address introducing the MacBook Air. This initial excitement lost some of its flame when it was found that the MacBook Air was missing most of the peripherals that notebook aficionados are used to having with other machines. Expectation led to joy in some quarters and disappointment in others.

Anticipation leading up to the introduction of the Apple iPhone last year prompted long lines of eager buyers to brave freezing temperatures and stand outside all night in order to purchase one of these devices. Yet, as it has been born out many times in the past, todays hot electronic gadget becomes tomorrows obsolete piece of junk.

This is not intended to be an indictment of a particular companys products or marketing strategies. However, it is a legitimate question to ask whether or not this impetuous fascination and preoccupation with change and glitter has had a negative effect on the art/craft industry.

5. The very thing that distinguishes art/craft from some of these other venues is its timeless quality and the gratification that can be obtained from viewing hand made creations from different perspectives. A focused marketing campaign directed toward spotlighting these differences might help to infuse the art show marketplace with some of the buzz that is elicited when the latest electronic gadget comes out.

6. How connected to reality is the concern reflected by many in this survey that off shore or culturally different work will end up competing, even crowding out American-made work. Is American-made art/craft a commodity that needs to be protected some way and if so how would onego about doing this?

In an article titled Twelve Ways to Know the Past Athanasios Moulakis writes, A culture is a unique kind of inheritance. It represents a hoard that can be preserved, nurtured, imaginatively enhanced, and sometimes even invented. It can be wasted, neglected, or allowed to fall to ruin, but it cannot be spent. (2008, Winter) The Wilson Quarterly.

A cultural legacy is not something that can be taken for granted. It is a living thing, not a fossil. In order to remain alive it needs to be continually scrutinized and interpreted. And what messages and meaning can be extracted depend to a great degree how one looks at it. Because of this, it may be a mistake to claim that American Art/Craft truly has an identifiable center.

7. In truth, the marketplace may already be adjusting to cultural changes in American society. If so, the question necessarily arises: Is this a bad thing? If the item is authentic and the person who had a hand in making it is present at the show, then how important is provenance?

The question remains whether or not the demand for American made things in and of itself is compromised by the introduction of fine or applied art from other cultures. Alternatively, the question has to be asked whether or not American art & craft carries the same weight or relevance that it did say 20 years ago. In truth, the market place ultimately determines all of these issues.

Final Thoughts

The purpose of this study was not to come up with solutions to the problems that were revealed in this survey. Anyone who expected that this study would yield specific answers or solutions to, say, problems with a sluggish marketplace will be disappointed. If what over 535 respondents report has a ring of truth to it, then both exhibitors and art shows are going to have to develop alternative methods for re-kindling an interest in American art and craft.

Art Business News (January, 2008) cited a recent statistic (from The Conference Board, www.tcb.org) which is revealing. In 2006 there was over $1.7 trillion available in discretionary income. However, 78% of that money was controlled by households earning over $100,000 annually. How does this bode for art and craft shows?

What is apparent is that art shows need to re-dedicate themselves at least in part to targeting this segment of the population since this is the population with most of the extra cash on hand.

However, the shows and exhibitors do not simply require that the affluent grace the grounds. Lest it be thought that this survey was taken by a bunch of ‘elitists’ whose work is overpriced and that is why they are not selling, the following facts are revealing. 25% report that the average retail price of their work is less than $100. Another 33% sell work in the $100 to $300 price range. 81% of all respondents to this survey have an average retail price which falls below $750.

It would seem from this that for a majority of exhibitors the buyer does not necessarily have to be affluent in order to afford their work. Rather, the prospective customer simply has to have a modest bit of discretionary money and the desire to own something that does not look like it belongs on the shelf of a Wal-Mart store.

How important is it for the future of the show marketplace, and the prospective customer that what is on display does not appear as if it belongs in some department store? Art and Craft shows need to begin to poll visitors to the shows regarding their perceptions about what is being presented for sale.

It wouldnt hurt to poll exhibitors as well; many are in a unique position to recognizework which is good, mediocre, and work which is flagrantly derivative and/or buy-sell. In other words, it may not simply be for a lack of customers that there is a perception the market place is in a state of decline; it may also be due to a perception by the prospective customer that they have seen it all before.

Although no clear paths emerged from this study that will lead to specific remedies for what is perceived as an unpredictable marketplace and escalating operational costs, the results do open the door to further study of the art-show industry. Several avenues of exploration to the inquisitive are available, which may ultimately help in restoring the vitality of American art and craft as it applies to the art/craft show marketplace.

National Association of Independent Artists 2008


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LETTER TO ARTISTS

April, 1996

Dear Artist,
In June of 1995 a group of approximately 25 Old Town Art Fair artists met informally at the art fair to discuss concerns and interests regarding the current state of affairs in the art festival business.

Included in the discussions were such topics as artists’ safety at shows, the decline of some major shows, establishing new opportunities in major markets, opening up channels of communication between artists and show committees, the need for artists to have a vehicle of communication that would be national in scope and the lack of nationally accepted show standards.

The result of this discussion was the suggestion that artists across the country be queried about the possibility of forming a nationwide independent artists association. Throughout the summer and fall surveys were distributed at several shows and it became obvious very quickly that there was a broad consensus in regard to what this association should be. Much momentum has been gained and many have been willing to contribute both time and money to the effort. Our initial goal is to establish a national communications network for artists. Ray Hartl has been working on the development of a newsletter to be published later this spring. Michael Hamilton has developed our Web site on the Internet – which has been up since January.

Our next goal is to provide exhibitor prospectives to show directors. To this end we will be establishing information gathering mechanisms to assemble information not only from the entire interested community of artists but also according to media, in order to address concerns of specific media catagories. In addition, in the future we paln to explore the establishment of artists advisory committees, member discounts from suppliers lodging, travel and other services, providing major medical insurance, producing a yearly trade show, developing resources for legal council, developing educational programs for the public, maintaining a database of member’s work, providing information and support to emerging artists, and providing emergency services to members.

If you would like to be a part of this effort, please fill out the enclosed form. If you have any further questions please let me or any of the other committee members know.

Sincerely,
Kathleen Eaton – Secretary


Gordon Rick Bruno – Artist’s Advisory
Ray Hartl – Newsletter
Ginny Herzog – National Show Standards
Lynn Krause – Meetings, Legal
Dan Gable – Treasurer
Banister Pope – President
Celeste Simon – Education
Michael Hamilton – Web Site

1996 ANN ARBOR MEETING

July, 1996
Ann Arbor Art Fairs
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Ginny Herzog, Banister Pope, Rick Bruno, Michael Hamilton, Jim and Kathleen Eaton and Larry Oliverson got together after the Ann Arbor show to discuss future efforts of the NAIA. Although the discussions covered many areas the primary focus was related to the next issue of the newsletter.

It was generally agreed that the topic that is of the greatest interest to the membership is that of National Standards or Show Practices. It was suggested that the upcoming newsletter should concentrate on this area and that it should be used as a mechanism to survey our membership to determine specific concerns, preferences, etc., that will become the data base for future efforts to improve our industry. In order to provide the respondents with the best background information possible and to create a newsletter that will have th potential of being of enormous interest to exhibiting professional artists it was agreed that directors of the major shows shouldbe given an opportunity to tell our membership how they run their shows, how exhibitors are selected, how jury and booth fees are used, etc.

To this end we have prepared the attached questionnaires, one for the directors and one for the artists. Neither is complete. What we would like is for you to reveiw these documents and feed us your suggestions for additional questions, modifications, etc. We think the best way to approach the various directors might be to phone them, let them know what we have in mind, send them the questionnaire and follow up in a week or so with a phone interview. The directors may also wish to respond in writing. Both Rick Bruno and Banister Pope have volunteered to handle this end. We wil also need to know which show directors we plan to contact.

Kathleen Eaton

NAIA CATEGORY ADVISORS

NAIA Category Advisors Committee head:

Toni Mann
561-586-0764 | 724-659-3464 (summer)
Email

CLAY

  • ADVISORS:
    Marilee Hall – 931-526-6649
    Steven Hill – 816-523-7316
  • COMMITTEE:
    James and Lisa Tevia-Clark – 704-837-8256
    Claudette & Paul Gerhold – 904-753-2564
    Jim & Shirl Parmentier – 607-547-8544

DRAWING

  • ADVISORS:
    Eugenie Torgersen – 616-687-1688
    Dale Jarrett – 913-262-5841
  • COMMITTEE:
    Margaret Dyer – 770-214-0525
    Edward Avila – 616-687-1688

FIBER

  • ADVISORS:
    Leon Niehues – 501-738-2901
    Juanita Girardin – 505-852-2026
  • COMMITTEE:
    Lara Breitman – 914-258-4796

GLASS

  • ADVISORS:
    Kenny Walton – 402-275-3382
    Duncan McClellan – 813-985-6429
  • COMMITTEE:
    John Bingham – 505-424-1991
    Andrew Shea – 612-332-5842
    James Wilbat – 847-940-0015

JEWELRY

  • ADVISORS:
    Carol Adams – 561-547-9966
    Valerie Hector – 847-328-1585
  • COMMITTEE:
    Aaron Macsai – 847-966-1222

2D MIXED MEDIA

  • ADVISORS:
    Lynn Whipple – 407-644-5223
    Janet O’Neal – 505-46-4251
  • COMMITTEE:
    Marian Steen – 314-994-1196
    John Whipple – 407-644-5223

3D MIXED MEDIA

  • ADVISORS:
    Cathy Rose – 904-462-7281
    Dwain Workman – 785-749-2111
  • COMMITTEE:
    Jon Hecker – 812-935-6172
    F.B. Fogg – 765-289-7464
    Mitch Levin – 847-577-9099

PAINTING

  • ADVISORS:
    Charles Gatewood – 334-297-4011
    Peggy Brown – 812-988-7271
  • COMMITTEE:
    Bert Beirne – 770-967-4446
    Dana Forrester – 816-478-2425

PHOTOGRAPHY

  • ADVISORS:
    Don Ament – 859-252-8368
    Eddie Soloway – 505-466-6030
  • COMMITTEE:
    Les Slesnick – 407-856-5434
    Ray Hartl – 414-889-4578

PRINTMAKING

  • ADVISORS:
    Deborah Mae Broad – 218-937-5340
  • COMMITTEE:
    Linda Adato – 914-632-7796
    Deborah Carlson – 303-670-8934
    Mamie Joe – 770-998-453
    Mitch Lyons – 610-869-8652

SCULPTURE

  • ADVISORS:
    Jack McLean – 815-363-0668
    Mark Wallis – 812-829-1747
  • COMMITTEE:
    James Eaton – 847-426-3608
    Bruce Niemi – 847-356-0356

Memorial to Howard Lieberman

Unexpectedly on Saturday, April 7, 2007. Beloved husband of Kathleen Treleani; father of Deborah Lieberman and the late Mark Lieberman; stepfather of Christopher, Patrick and Jonathan Treleani; brother of Herbert Lieberman; grandfather of Oliver, Kye and Christopher; brother in law of Anna Lisiecki. Howard was a Professor of Art at CCAC and a nationally known pencil artist. He was well known for his love of animals especially cats and was a respected member of Butler Cat Fanciers and American Tabby and Tortie. A remembrance gathering will be announced at a later date. In lieu of flowers the family requests memorials to the Animal Friends, 2643 Penn Ave. Pgh, PA 15222. Arrangements by GEORGE A. THOMA FUNERAL HOME, INC. 10418 Perry Hwy. Wexford 15090
Send condolences at post-gazette.com/gb

Published in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on 4/10/2007.


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

FESTIVAL OF THE MASTERS

Orlando, FL
November, 1995


ARTISTS!
SATURDAY, 6PM, LAKEFRONT STAGE

If you’re reading this, it’s because as an artist who does outdoor shows you’re already part of a casual but amazingly effective information network. Most of what we know about shows and what’s happening on the show circuit we learn from other artists. Collectively, we share a huge amount of knowledge and experience, and we share many of the same concerns.

Remarkably, what we haven’t established until know is a collective voice. Because of this, we’ve had very little input into the direction our industry has taken. As artists, we comprise the essential core of the festival phenomena, but it’s as if we’ve been on cruise control. Now, all of a sudden, 75% of us are into our forties and many agree that the time has arrived to make a concerted effort to exert some large and positive influence on the future of our community. Collectively, we can accomplish much.

The National Association of Independent Artists has been formed, having grown from the dialog begun in Chicago in June and carried forward by a group of your peers who’ve invested the time and energies it has taken to get us to this point. Already, we are more than 100 artists strong and recognizing the need to share the load among us, almost everyone has indicated a willingness to contribute some volunteer time to some aspect of our effort.

To be our most effective, we need to experience a rapid swelling of our membership. Toward that end, there will be a short meeting Saturday night at the Lakefront Stage to introduce the volunteers who have agreed to act as an initial steering committee and lead groups of volunteers in the pursuit of our goals. We’ll try to be prepared to answer questions at this meeting, but as everyone would like to keep it short and sweet, here’s an overview of what the association hopes to accomplish:

The purpose of the association is to enhance the economic well-being of people who exhibit their work at outdoor and indoor art and/or craft shows, to encourage creative expression and artistic excellence, and to expand public awareness, appreciation and acquisition of American art and fine craft.

We recognize that the full range of what we might accomplish has not occurred to us, but here are some of the things we intend to do:

  • Promote the improvement of existing shows and the development of high quality shows in promising new markets.
  • Establish a newsletter and Internet Web site to provide membership with information and to serve as a forum for the discussion of our ideas and concerns.
  • Seek concessions for our collective membership for the goods and services we use.
  • Provide educational information to various media.
  • Secure “pro bono” legal counsel by region for membership.
  • Explore health care options for membership.
  • Establish an annual convention/trade show.
  • Serve as a positive, cooperative resource for directors of non-profit shows.
  • Provide information and support to emerging artists.

If you have have questions or suggestions, please write them on your survey. Someone will contact you later to discuss them. This way, the meeting stays short!

The newsletter will probably address the specifics of each of the items listed above. The important things to bear in mind when discussing this association among peers, or with others, are these:

  1. This isn’t a union. We are not out to flex our collective muscle or take anything but a cooperative stance. Our purpose is to work with anyone interested in making our industry better. We have literally thousands of years experience among us and the capacity to find a positive resolution to any problem that arises.
  2. This is an association of peers. Every effort made to furthur the goals of the association helps us all. Correspondingly, an opportunity ignored helps no one. We need and welcome the inolvement of everyone.

Please plan to join us at the Lakefront Stage at 6 P.M. and please bring your completed survey as we need to collect information for our initial newsletter.

2005 ARTIST CONFERENCE AGENDA

Please note that this is a tentative schedule only. We reserve the right to change times and topics.

Day 1 ? Sunday, July 24
Afternoon PLAYTIME at Maumee Bay! An afternoon to enjoy the beaches, pools and other facilities of Maumee Bay Resort
Evening
  • Welcoming Dinner
  • A Decade of Blazing Trails: The NAIA 10th Anniversary Celebration
  • Bonfire in the fire pit by Lake Erie
Day 2 ? Monday, July 25
Ongoing throughout day: SILENT AUCTION (see details)
Morning
  • General Conference Sessions
  • Welcome
  • Executive Director Welcome
  • Keynote Speech (An exciting speaker soon to be announced!)
  • Open for Business: Directors Share Insights into Running a Show
  • Inroads to the Art Patron: A Panel Discussion with Art Collectors
  • Scenic Overlook: An NAIA Strategic Planning Update
Afternoon
  • Breakout Sessions and Optional Workshops
  • Let’s Talk Specifics: Input into the NAIA Strategic Plan, Vision, Goals and Initiatives
  • Roundtable Discussions with Show Directors
  • Digital Workshop: Practical Applications of Image Editing Programs (details)
    Presenters: Larry Berman and Randall Smith
    Fee: $50
  • Technology Workshop: An Artists Guide to the Future – Using Technology as a Creative Tool (details)
    Presenter: Chris Maher
    Fee: $25
  • Mapping your Way through an IRS Audit
  • Workshop: Fit for the Road: Portable Massage Techniques
    Presenter: Sara Corkery
  • Individual Image Evaluations (by appointment)
    An opportunity to have your individual jury images evaluated by a panel of experts.
Evening Dinner on your own.

  • Optional Evening Workshop – 7:30 – 10:00 p.m.
    Digital Workshop: Image Editing 101 (details)
    Presenters: Larry Berman and Randall Smith
    Fee: $50
Day 3 ? Tuesday, July 26
Morning
  • General Conference Sessions
  • NAIA Annual Meeting
  • Intersecting Avenues: Exploring New Venues for Economic Success as an Artist
  • The Joy of Creation
  • Artist Panel: The Successful Artist in the Booth Next Door: Personal Choices that Have Helped to Achieve their Goals
Afternoon
  • Breakout Sessions and Optional Workshops
  • Digital Workshop: Practical Applications of Image Editing Programs (details)
    Presenters: Larry Berman and Randall Smith
    Fee: $50
  • Breakout: Successful Artists
  • Breakout: Taking a Spin in the Driver’s Seat: Serving on an NAIA Board or Committee
  • Workshop: Planning and Marketing for the Art Show Artist
  • Individual Image Evaluations (by appointment)
Late afternoon
  • General Session
  • Mock Jury: You be the Judge: Evaluating Digital Images using a ZAPP Process Digital Jury

REPRODUCTIONS AND ORIGINAL PRINTS: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

The text of the presentation given at the IFEA Convention in Denver, September 1998
by Dale Rayburn

Revised by the author Sept, 2001

At a recent meeting of the NAIA, Banister Pope introduced me as “an artist that had been doing outdoor shows since God was a boy”. It hasn’t been quite that long, however I did exhibit in my first outdoor show over thirty years ago.

When we look back in retrospect, shows that were held 30 years ago were pretty simple. Artists brought out their oil paintings, watercolors, drawings, pottery etc. and the public seemed to grasp whatever the artists were showing and were glad to see us. Art festivals have grown from a few dozen shows back then to hundreds now and have developed into a major industry.

I’ve tried to keep abreast of the innovations as they have arrived. Artists have more tools and more technology available to them now than anyone could imagine just a few years ago. New types of painting material, computers, digital cameras, all of the high tech printers, the list goes on. Artists are experimenting more and more and the lines between the traditional media categories have become more and more fuzzy. As each day goes by, it becomes harder and harder to determine what belongs in an art festival and what does not. It is no wonder that show organizers throw up their hands in frustration at times trying to figure out what is what.

That is why we are here today, to try and deal with one of these ‘fuzzy’ issues, reproductions. What are reproductions? Are they art? or not? Do they belong in outdoor art festivals? If so, in what capacity? If painters are allowed to exhibit reproductions, does that mean that other media categories like jewelry and pottery, for example, will expect the same privilege? If they are not art and do not belong in art festivals, how does one identify them or police them? These are all tough questions and there are no easy answers. The one thing that is clear is that the issue is not going away, so maybe today we can begin a dialog that might point us in the right direction.

There is one thing that I need to make clear up front. The NAIA has not made a stand for or against reproductions. One reason is that we do not deal with marketing issues, and another is that we have members that are on both sides of the issue. So, we are not here to try to tell you if you should or should not allow reproductions in your show. What we hope to accomplish today is to provide enough information so that you can make intelligent decisions about what is best for your own show.

We have basically three things to show you today. Number one is a list of print definitions along with characteristics that will help you to identify them. The differences are pretty academic and I’ll try to explain them as we go along. Second, we have actual examples of the more popular forms of printmaking and reproductions that are being shown in outdoors show currently. Third, we have the results of a recent poll that was conducted by the NAIA concerning the idea of a “reproduction tent”.

As noted in our newsletter, this survey did not include a question on the acceptability of reproductions, but the returned comments revealed strong objections to their inclusion at the high level shows. Also noted was the need for a clear explanation of what they are – separating the terminology of “original print” and “reproduction” to clarify the “print” issue that is often confused in the minds of the general public. These comments are unedited and include responses from both sides of the reproduction issue.

We really can’t talk about just reproductions without dealing with this “umbrella” term Prints. So what I have done is to list all the major disciplines that fall under the term Prints and have separated them as to which are original graphics and those that are reproductions. You will notice as we go along that some of the terminology is very similar on both lists and herein lies the heart of our problem with trying to understand the difference in original prints and reproductions.

As far as the public is concerned, the most confusing single word is Print. When this term is used at an art festival, the public is not sure if they are looking at an etching, a photograph, a reproduction or what. I wish that we could just drop the word Print from our vocabulary and call everything by it’s correct name. I realize this is just a dream and will never happen in my lifetime, so what we have to do is try to cut down on the confusion by educating ourselves as well as the public.

The single most misunderstood phrase is Signed and Numbered Limited Edition Print. What does that mean?? Over the years, it has become customary for makers of original prints to sign and number their prints with pencil and as a result, the public associates this practice with original artwork. When artists sign their reproductions in the same manner and refer to them as signed and numbered prints rather than signed and numbered reproductions, this really confuses everyone. So you can see that when shows require people to sign and number their reproductions, this just makes it harder for the public to separate the original prints from the reproductions. Nothing is more potentially damaging to a shows reputation than a patron that buys something only to discover that it is less wonderful than they originally thought.

Some art festivals have rules that limit edition sizes intending this as a means of quality control. Maybe they feel that by limiting an edition, that somehow the art will be better. Keep in mind that Rembrandt, perhaps the greatest etcher of all time, did not edition his etchings. Ansel Adams, Americas premiere photographer, did not edition his photographs. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not advocating that artist should not edition their work. I’m just saying that the decision of editioning should be left totally up to the artist. Every artist has different marketing strategies. Some prefer small, more exclusive editions that would allow them to place a higher value on each piece. Other artists might prefer an open, or unlimited edition in order to keep their prices more affordable. Instead of using edition limits as a means of quality control, art festivals would be much better served by seeking out jurors that can recognize the Rembrandts and Ansel Adams of today. First, lets look at the definitions and I will show you some examples. We will have time for you to examine these examples before we finish.

What is an Original Print?
(From the Print Council of America) The artist alone has made the image in or upon the plate, stone, wood block or other material for the primary purpose of creating a work of graphic art. The print is made directly from that original material by the artist or pursuant to his directions. (The image doesn’t exist unless it is printed.)

Four traditional processes

  1. Intaglio: The process in which an image is either cut or bitten by acid into a metal plate. Ink is forced into these lines, the plate is wiped clean except for the ink that remains in these lines. A print is made when the plate and paper are run together through an etching press under heavy pressure. • Print has a platemark embossed around the edge of the image • Ink is raised on the print and can be seen as well as felt.
    • Etching: The surface of a metal plate is covered with an acid resist ground. The image is cut through this ground to expose the metal. The plate is immersed in acid and the exposed parts of the metal are eaten away.
    • Aquatint: This is a method of achieving tonal effects on a metal plate by applying a powdered rosin that, when heated and melted to the plate, acts as a acid resist. This allows the plate to be bitten with acid in areas where tones are desired.
    • Hand colored etching: An etching that has been printed, usually in one dark color, and allowed to dry. Then each print is hand colored with a water-based medium such as watercolor or acrylic.
    • Photo etching: A process for transferring photography images onto a light-sensitive plate and etching the plate in the traditional manner.
    • Drypoint and Engraving: These techniques do not involve acid. The design is scratched or dug directly out of the metal plate with various tools.
  2. Relief Printing: A process in which the image to be printed is created in relief. Materials such as wood, linoleum or plaster may be cut away to leave the image raised. • The printed area is usually flat and the negative areas show no signs of printing. • When the print is viewed from the back, there will be raised areas where the paper has been pressed down into the carved out parts of the wood or linoleum.
    • Woodcut: A relief printing process where the design is cut from a side grained or flat grained block of wood.
    • Linocut: A relief print made from a design cut from a mounted piece of linoleum.
    • Collagraph: A print made from a surface developed with collage elements
  3. Planographic printing: A form of printing in which the print is taken from a flat surface. • It does not have embossed edge like intaglio. • Similar in appearance to a crayon drawing. • Usually does not have sharp mechanical edges.
    • Lithograph: The process of making a print from images drawn or painted with a greasy material onto limestone or a metal plate that has a simulated limestone surface. Lithography works on the principle that oil and water do not mix.
  4. Stencil printing: A process of printing using stencils. • Large areas of solid color and hard edges Serigraph (silkscreen): The principle of silkscreen printing consist of applying stencils to a screen in such a way that when ink is applied, it is prevented from passing through parts while penetrating others. For each color, the ink is squeegeed though a different screen onto the paper.

Other forms of expression that produce original prints.

  • Monotype: A printing process that starts with a blank plate or matrix. The artist paints on the plate as if painting on paper or canvas. When the image is complete and while the paint is still wet, paper is placed on top of the plate and is run through an etching press or is pressed by hand to transfer the painting to paper. • Images are usually very spontaneous showing free brush strokes or roller marks. • Sometimes will have an embossed edge much like an intaglio. • Usually numbered 1/1 to indicate that it is a one-of-kind print.
  • Monoprint: A process very similar to monotype except for the fact that the plate or matrix contains a repeatable image that is etched or cut into the plate. After inking the etched or cut part of the plate, the artist can add more paint or ink to the plate as in a monotype. When printed, each print will be different. • A specific image will repeat in a series of prints even though each print appears to be different. • Has most of the same characteristics of a monotype.
  • Photography: A process in which an image is captured by a camera lens and recorded on a photosensitive emulsion in the form of a negative, a transparency, or directly as a positive (e.g. Polaroid). It can also be captured as a digital image in a computer memory chip. This image can be manipulated using a variety of techniques and materials to produce a photographic print. The image is capable of being reinterpreted to produce multiple prints, either similar to or diverse from the previous print.
  • Digital Printing (computer): A digital print is made directly from a newly created digital file. This file can be produced totally in a computer program or, as is more commonly done, by significantly manipulating other images that have been brought into the computer to create a work that has not previously existed in another medium. (*This description was paraphrased from the original Print Council definition for the sake of clarity) • Ink appears flat with no texture. May have a photographic quality. • Edges of image are usually straight and mechanical with no embossing. • Dot pattern can sometimes be seen in light or pale area of color. • Method of printing: ink jet, iris, giclee, electrostatic, Xerox, or laser.

What is a Reproduction?
(From the American Print Alliance) If a work of art already exists (as a painting, watercolor, drawing, photograph, or whatever) and a photocopy or digital impression is made, that copy is a second generation or reproductive image; A reproduction.

Off-Set (lithograph) A painting or other type of original art is photographed and the image is separated onto four aluminum plates. The image is picked up from these plates by a rubber roller which then reprints (off sets) it onto paper. This is the most common method of commercial printing. • Most reproductions show characteristics of original art processes. They, look like oil paintings, watercolors, drawings etc. (Original prints such as etchings, woodcuts, etc. have distinctive characteristics of their own) • If the image is perfectly printed and has mechanical edges, it’s probably a reproduction • When looked at through a 20X magnifying glass, a distinctive dot pattern will appear. • Inks will appear flat and with no texture. • If the print is hand signed and the edition is over 300, it’s probably a reproduction.

Serigraph: This is same process as described under original prints, however a painting or other original artwork is photographed and the image is separated onto separate screens. Even though the printed image looks very much like an original serigraph, the result is still a reproduction.

Electrostatic Printing: The process of attracting printing inks or dyes to the surface of a material by an electrostatic (electric charge) pulse. Xerox is an example of this type of copier. • When viewed with a magnifying glass, there is no dot pattern as in an off-set, however, the reds and blues have a slight halo. • Dark colors have a raised appearance much like a silkscreen. • Size of the printed image is usually limited to 11″ by 17. • The quality of this process ranges from cheap appearing Kinko copies to images almost as good as the expensive inkjet printers

Ink jet Printing: The process of scanning an original artwork into a computer and printing the image onto paper or canvas with an inkjet printer creating a continuous tone reproduction. These printers spray millions of dots of dye per second producing almost photographic results. Texture is often a distinguishing factor • Dot pattern can sometimes be seen with a 20X magnifying glass in light or pale colors. This pattern is not visible if the image is printed on a soft paper. • Prices of these reproductions are usually much higher than offsets because of production cost. This is changing very fast because the cost of ink jet printers is dropping. Prints can be printed in sizes up to 4 by 8 feet. • Can be printed on all kinds of expensive art papers as well as canvas. Sometimes signed by artist in small editions.

Giclee (Zhee-CLAY): A French tern that means ‘to spurt’. The term giclee was created by Iris Graphic of Bedford, Mass. Giclee has become the popular term for ink jet printing.

*Special note: When trying to distinguish between an original print and a reproduction, try to think of the artist’s intention. When the artwork is conceived by the artist to be printed as multiples and not conceived to be a painting, drawing, etc., that print would be an original. When an original piece of art (such as a painting, drawing, photograph etc.) is copied by photographic means and printed on an offset press, a serigraph press, or through a computer by means of an ink jet or electrostatic printer, this would be a reproduction.

NAIA Artists’ Survey
Have most of you received the latest NAIA newsletter? If not, I believe we have some extras. Even though you might have already received one, we have included a copy of the report concerning the “reproduction tent” question. We won’t try to go over all this because you can read it later. Please take notice to the artist responses when you do read it.

So…..do you allow reproductions to be included in your show? If the answer is no, then you are hopefully a little better informed as to what to look for. When in doubt, refer back to the definitions that we have given you.

If you decide that reproductions should be a part of your show, please let us give you some suggestions on how this might be done so as to educate the public.

  1. Don’t require artist to sign and number their reproductions. There is nothing wrong with signing and numbering, but it is not necessary as long as each and every reproduction is clearly marked “Reproduction”.
  2. Monitor and enforce your rules.

Conclusion: Soon after the IFEA requested that we address the reproduction issue, we opened a dialog with artists and the public to try to get as much feedback as possible. It became apparent that it really was a ‘Hot Potato’ issue. Almost everyone had very strong opinions and those opinions varied greatly. It is obvious that there is no way to please everyone. That is impossible! The thing that became more clear than ever was that the NAIA and all the Art Festivals must work together and try to keep the standard of our industry as high as possible. At the same time we have a responsibility to our public, not only to enlighten, but also to educate. All of us are in a position of leadership and should not take it lightly. I really hope that 30 more years down the road, the art historians and the academic community will look back at our ‘street shows’ and recognize the point at which we sorted out these issues.

“Ends” Policies

Adopted December 3-4, 2001

Global Ends Statement:
THE MISSION OF NAIA IS THE PROFESSIONAL AND ECONOMIC SUCCESS OF ITS MEMBERSHIP


Major Components of this Mission (not reflecting any order of priority except where noted):

1. There are viable markets for art.

  • Quality art fairs (highest priority)
    • Collaboration between artists and show producers
      • Communications between artists and show producers
      • Show directors are aware of and sensitive to exhibitor needs
    • High and consistant standards
      • Jurying/application procedures
      • Rules enforcement
      • Logistics/aesthetics/environment
    • Indoor and outdoor venues

Alternative venues

    • Internet
    • Open studios
    • Museum/gallery shows
    • Direct marketing

2. Artists have the knowledge and resources necessary for success.

Knowledge

    • Professional practices
      • Jury/application practices
      • Exhibiting practices

Resources

    • Available information
      • Business skills
      • Venues
    • Networking/access to surveys

3. The public benefits from the direct contact with the art and the artists who create it.

Understanding of media and methods

4. Members receive exclusive benefits.

Communications

    • Newsletters
    • Survey results

Group buying discount

    • Member work and contact available on website
    • Member Gallery (nominal charge)
    • Exclusive discounts on NAIA products and services

Memorial to Roddy Reed

I wanted to post on your forum but i am not a member. I want to say “Thank You” to NAIA and fellow artists for all the kind words and still remembering my uncle, Roddy Reed. There is no doubt that Roddy was the best when it came to his Pinch Pots. It still amazes me what he could do with a little piece of clay and his bare hands, literally turning dirt into gold. He was a true artist and explorer of nature. I have many stories about him from swimming with Manatees to carrying huge boulders across the country. And Roddy’s absolute love and respect for other artists.

Anyway, thank you.

Robert Reed Morgan


REED, RODDY BROWNLEE, 58, of Tampa died on Thursday, October 27, 2005. He was predeceased by his father, U.S. Air Force Captain Roddy W. Reed. He is survived by his mother, Martha R. Johnson; brother, Rich Reed of Tampa; and sister, Perrie Lynn Stephens of Augusta, Ga. He served in the United States Army and while in Korea, he established an orphanage for Korean children. An integral part of Ybor City’s art community, he was known around the world for his “Pinch Pots” with exhibits in Japan and New Zealand. In Belgium Roddy’s work was part of the Artist In Embassies Program, which was arranged by a fan of his work, Madeline Albright. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Roddy Brownlee Reed Foundation at the Community Foundation of Tampa Bay, 4950 W. Kennedy Blvd. Suite 250, Tampa, FL 33609. Visitation will be held 6:30-7:30 p.m. Friday, November 4, 2005, at Marsicano B. Marion Reed Stowers Funeral Home at 4040 Henderson Blvd. in Tampa. Burial will take place at the Florida Nationa l Cemetery in Bushnell at a later date.

Published at TBO.com on 10/30/2005.


Roddy Reed passed away this past week. I’m sure many of you knew him better than I did as he had been making his one of a kind pinch pots and selling them at art fairs since the seventies. I’m sure he will be missed and I thought his passing should be noted.
Maria Reyes-Jones


I recall the first time I saw his work (at the Plaza show) and was stunned by it. I could not understand how someone could do that by hand! His passing will hurt all of us, for he surely raised the level of any show he attended.

Sincerely,
Paul Germain


Roddy was a wonderful and funny man in addition to being a fantastic ceramic artist.

Martha Giberson


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

1997 ANN ARBOR MEETING

July, 1997
Ann Arbor Art Fairs
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Banister Pope, Gordon Bruno, Larry Oliverson, Lenny Lyons-Bruno, Jim and Kathleen Eaton, Robert Briscoe, Aletha Jones, Lynn Krause, Jody dePew McLeane, Barb Pihos, Sharon Donovan, Celeste Simon, Michael Hamilton and Ginny Herzog got together after the Ann Arbor Art Fairs with Bill Charney, former director of the Cherry Creek Art Festival for a seminar on organizational structure for the NAIA. Susan Froehlich (former director of the Ann Arbor Street Art Fair) was also in attendance to contribute her unique viewpoints on board functioning.

Bill led us all through a very intensive examination of what an effective organizational structure can do for NAIA and how to go about establishing the important relationships between the Board of Directors, staff, President/CEO and of course the owners of NAIA, its members. Without trying to cover the entire long two days, the ultimate challenge for the board is deciding upon “ends” rather than getting bogged down in “means”. Or to define what effects, for whom, at what cost are sufficient to justify the organization’s existence. In short, what is the organization for? What is it’s “swap” with the world (resources consumed vs. human benefits created)?

The “ends” work of the board is to determine not only what this statement should actually be, but to further refine it. The board task is not to work out what is to be done to achieve the desired results, for those are left to the President/CEO and staff. Defining and sub-defining of what good, which people, and at what cost continues to the point that the board is willing to allow the CEO to use any reasonable interpretation of the board’s words that he or she chooses. CEO evaluation is against the attainment of these “ends” and, on the other hand, against the avoidance of unacceptable means that the board has defined in it Executive Limitations policies.

This was, in Bill’s terms, a “blitz” policy development workshop. For those of us who have had no interaction or knowledge of how boards work, it was a very educational process, to say the least, and NAIA is indebted to Bill for his pro-bono work on our behalf. For those who have suffered with disfunctional boards and organizations, it was quite enlightening.

Many other aspects of a formal policy structure for NAIA were also hammered out including nomination, election and term limits; annual board planning cycle; committee structure; board committee principles; directors’ individual responsibilities; board members code of conduct; governance commitment; organizational values; governing style; board job description; agenda planning; chairperson’s role all as a function of the governance process. Under Executive Limitations the following policy were agreed upon: general executive constraint; treatment of members; treatment of staff; financial planning/budgeting; financial condition and activities; asset protection; emergency executive succession and communication and support to the board. Other policies will be determined at the appropriate time.

While meeting, the “ad hoc” board elected a Nomination Committee (Jody de Pew McLeane, Gordon Bruno, Alicia Robinson and Larry Oliverson) to draw up nominations for the NAIA Board of Directors. Also, Banister Pope was elected interim President/CEO and Bob Briscoe was elected interim chairman of the board.

Memorial to Timothy Langholz

Timothy’s website


Tim Langholz, 43, of Decorah, died suddenly Sunday, Nov. 2, 2008, in Decorah. Memorial Services are today (Thursday, Nov. 6) at 11 a.m. at Decorah Lutheran Church in Decorah by Rev. Tom Pietz, Rev. Bryan Robertson and Rev. Allen Vik. Friends called from 4-8 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 5, at Fjelstul Funeral Home in Decorah and also may call an hour prior to the services on Thursday at the church. Organist is Otter Dreaming. Special music is by family friends (“Oh, My Friends”). Instrumentalists are John Goodin and Erik Sessions. Congregational Hymns are “This Is My Father’s World” and “Sending You Light.”

Timothy Richard “Tim” Langholz was born July 21, 1965, in Postville, the son of Robert E. and Hanna M. (Knappe) Langholz. He was baptized by his father at St. Paul Lutheran Church, Monona, and confirmed at Our Savior Lutheran Church in Waterloo.

On December 2, 1997 Tim was united in marriage to Annette Laitinen in Decorah. This union was blessed with their daughter, Ruby. Tim attended elementary school at MFL Consolidated School in Monona and Edison Elementary in Waterloo. He was a 1983 graduate of Central High School in Waterloo and a 1987 graduate of Luther College in Decorah. Tim developed a love of creating art through pottery and painting and was the owner and operator of Langholz Pottery in Burr Oak. His work was influenced by mentors Peter Deneen of St. Paul, Minn. and Dean Schwarz of Decorah, and has come to be known nationwide through contemporary craft shows, festivals and fairs. Collected by a devoted fan base, Tim’s work is known for designs that are dynamic and clean, meticulous and geometric.

Tim was known for his love of the outdoors and spent many hours morel mushroom hunting in the woods, fishing and gardening. He had a passion for building igloos, which attracted many visitors to their yard each winter. Tim was a regular at weekly ultimate frisbee games with friends and frequently initiated road trips to see his favorite musicians perform. Of all his passions, his favorite was family, especially spending time with his daughter, Ruby, doing art projects, making Halloween costumes, May Day baskets and tending their flower garden together.

Tim is survived by his wife, Annette Laitinen of Decorah; his daughter, Ruby Langholz of Decorah; his mother, Hanna Langholz of Decorah; two sisters: Rebecca Hamilton of Wabasha, Minn. and Gail Hudson of Chicago, Ill.; four brothers: John (Flery) Langholz of St. Louis, Mo., James (Jane) Langholz of Decorah, Paul (Anita) Langholz of Clear Lake and Joel (Jocelyn) Langholz of Ashland, Wis.; nieces: Laura Hudson, Angela Hudson, Janna Langholz and Maria Langholz; nephews: Nathan Langholz, Ben Langholz, Sam (Kristin) Langholz, Luke (Krystal) Langholz and Noah Langholz; mother-in-law and father-in-law, Helen and Tom Laitinen of Decorah; sisters-in-law and brother-in-law: Bill Laitinen of Boise, Idaho, Mary (Ken) Keelan of Boulder, Colo. and Janelle (fiancé James Jones) Laitinen Minneapolis, Minn.

He was preceded in death by his father, Robert E. Langholz on December 7, 1999.

A memorial trust has been set up on behalf of Annette and Ruby at Viking State Bank & Trust, 321 W. Water Street, Decorah, 52101. Please make checks payable to Betsy Peirce for them. Thank you.


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

Memorial to Hal David Berger

Hal Berger, one man that created wonderful glass but lived life hard, died in his sleep at 54. For those who knew Hal knew him to be a man that kind of spit in the face of healthy living but was truly one of the more colorful characters of our art fair scene.


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

Memorial to Glenn Donovan

Some sad news to report here. I just learned the Glenn died yesterday from a pulmonary aneurism. It was sudden. He was having difficulties breathing over the weekend. We have lost a great man, a relentless humorist and a creative soul. He will truly be missed. Our hearts go out to Edie.

A memorial is being planned by his family and Edie Ehlert, his life companion and collaborator on the work. It will be this Saturday, January 26 at 2:30 pm in the Community Building right on Hwy. 171 in Gays Mills, WI. Pot luck dinner to follow. Anyone interested can attend. Memorial contributions can be made to the Community Conservation project: http://www.communityconservation.org/

Here are two links for Glenn. His own website:
http://www.welderboy-art.com/

Sally’s Art Show Artists website, where Glenn and Edie can be found from an April 2002 visit:
http://www.welderboy-art.com/

Be safe and take care everyone.

Peace,
Jon Hecker

Here is the obituary for Glen.
http://simefuneralforum.com/obituaries.php

Via con Dios, Glen.
Patricia


What a sad day. Glenn was a great friend. He was sooo funny, and yet compassionate and a good listener. He could bullshit when it was required, and yet had a serious side when it came to the important issues of the environment and politics and life. What a creative mind! His work was always evolving. He and Edie were enjoying the new collaborative work they had just started producing the last couple of years.

I miss you already, Glenn. I will miss your smile, and your great big hugs. I hope you and Marvin and Rick are shooting the shit on some astral plane… plotting how to get the Democrats back in the Whitehouse most likely!

Another reminder to enjoy every sandwich,

Wendy Hill


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

NAIA IDEAL PROSPECTUS & SLIDE

This prospectus is designed to provide the information most often requested by artists. Events which include this information are encouraged to note “This prospectus/application is in accordance with NAIA standards”. Many thanks to member Jon Hecker for his work on the ideal prospectus!


Cover:

  • Name of Event
  • Location of Event
  • Date of Event
  • Application Deadline

Back Cover:

  • Mailing label
  • Event return address

Inside:

  • Two-page artist application including:
  • Name, address, phone: day, evening
  • Name of second artist/partner (fill in only if work is a collaborative effort. See Rules)
  • __ Check here if this is a new address
  • __ Check here if willing to demonstrate
  • __ Check one medium/ category applying for
  • __ Booth space request
  • __ Promotional postcards: Quantity__
  • __ Promotional stickers to adhere to your postcards: Quantity__
  • Slide descriptions, dimensions, etc. with ample amount of space.

When considering the layout it is important to insure that the applicant is left with all pertinent information after the application/release portion has been returned.

General release:

  • Applicant’s signature, Tax ID # ?

Application checklist:

  • __ Completed application
  • __ Check payable to _______for jury fee. (Booth fee due upon acceptance)
  • __ Labeled slides in clear slide holder
  • __ Self addressed, stamped reply envelope
  • __ Photocopy of Applicant picture I.D. (Send with booth fee)
  • __ Any other necessary information

Application Information:

  • Category:____________________
  • Slides:
    • How many?
    • Booth slide – mandatory, and must be representative of presentation and work to be displayed
    • Slide labeling information per NAIA standards:

To label each slide per NAIA standards, hold image as it would be viewed held up to a light. Your name is at top center, medium at bottom center, a number in the lower right corner to correspond with your slide descriptions on the appplication, and of course, the red dot in the lower left corner!

  • Fees: (Jury, booth, corner, double, etc.)
  • Checks payable to: ______________
  • Non-refundable jury fee deposited upon receipt
  • Booth fee due upon acceptance, deposited upon receipt
  • Liability insurance information (if required)
  • Photocopy of picture ID will be required upon acceptance and at registration
  • Explanation of cancellation policy
  • Refund schedule: Complete definition of terms
  • Event contact names, address, email, phone and fax number for applicant reference

Calendar block indicating:

  • ___ Application deadline postmark
  • ___ Notifications mailed
  • ___ Booth fee due upon acceptance
  • ___ Date payment is deposited
  • ___ Cancellation deadline
  • ___ Set-up date
  • ___ Show dates

Note: If event is unable to accept booth fees upon acceptance, the date checks will be deposited will be included in this calendar block.

Jury Process:

  • How many slides?
  • Projected in what order?
  • Jury score card provided with notification
  • How many spaces are available through the jury process?
  • How many applicants were there the previous year?
  • Policy on reinvited artists, exempt from jurying, or spaces held in reserve for assignment at Director’s discretion.

Jury Notification:

  • ___ Date
  • ___ Accepted
  • ___ Rejected
  • ___ Score
  • ___ Cutoff score
  • ___ Wait-List for category

Jurors:

  • ___ Score: Are the slide jurors and the awards judges the same?
  • ___ Score: What are their credentials?
  • ___ Score: How many of the jurors are exhibiting artists?
  • ___ Score: Peer Jurors?

Awards:

  • ___Judging process
  • ___Structure
  • ___Dollar amount

Rules:

  • Each applicant may apply only once for a given category, unless submitting a completely separate body of work i.e. one person submitting one body of work under more than one name.
  • Definition of collaboration
  • Definition of category
  • Exclusions/ unacceptable items

“Our reputation for enforcing the rules is deserved. All displays will be visited by the Viewing Committee at intervals throughout the Festival to ensure that exhibitors comply with all Festival rules. It is our exclusive right and responsibility to remove work that is not in compliance. Repeated non-compliance will result in expulsion and ineligibility for judging, awards and participation in future Festivals.”

(leave this space open for individual shows to use for their own purposes)

Show Information:

  • Show hours
  • Location:
    • Display surface (pavement, lawn, etc.)
    • Display setting (street, park, indoor, outdoor, etc,)
  • Display size: 10 x 12 (overall size)
    • Storage space available:
      • Behind booth______
      • Next to booth______
  • Attendance figures from previous years (if applicable)
  • Advertising/ promotion- postcards, stickers, radio, TV, print, etc.
  • Demographics of venue market
  • Artist services:
    • Security information
    • Parking
    • Storage
    • Electricity (wattage)
    • Jewelers’ lockup
    • Restroom facilities
    • Break room
    • Breakfast
    • Awards dinner
  • Accessibility:
    • Description of loading/ unloading process
    • Wheelchair access (conform to ADA standards)

Memorial to Marvin Hill

After a battle with cancer, dear Marvin passed in 2003. In his honor, the Cherry Creek Arts Festival instituted a “Marvin Hill Award” for the 2004 show.

In preparing this memorial section of the website, I asked Wendy if she had more tributes to Marvin I could add to his page, as there was only one so far. She sent me a few:

Hi Sally,

There are many more testimonials, from newspaper articles to poems people sent, etc, but I tried to find writing that spoke specifically to Marvin’s being and talent, and found several emails sent to me by the art fair community and collectors. I did a little editing, taking out personal information, but for the most part left the messages intact.

It was a fitting way to spend the morning… this is the 3rd anniversary of his death, and although my life has changed in many ways, he’s still right there beside me.

Thanks for the catharsis,
Wendy


Wendy Dearest,
Your and Marvin’s work has been a part of our family’s life– his way of seeing things has expanded my sight. He will continue to be a part of our lives until our ends —
— Julilly Kohler


Hello Wendy,
Marvin was an incredible creative artist and human being. I enjoyed both his depth and his subtle sense of humor. I’m very sorry for your loss – and ours. He will be missed.
Sincerely,
Michael Imes


Dear Wendy,
I read about Marvin’s death in today’s Journal-Sentinel. Please accept my condolences.
I remember buying his Painted Bird prints on Locust Street so many years ago. Five of his prints are
hanging on my walls now.
He will be missed but always remembered.
Charles Piette
Wauwatosa


Wendy:
Please accept my sincerest sympathies. You obviously know what a great man Marvin was and that his memory will live on for years to come in the thousands of people whose lives he touched with his work or just through speaking with Marvin.
Ellen Clark


Wendy, Lenny and I were so sad to hear this news. From your last post a couple of weeks ago we realized that things were not looking good. But to hear it was over still came as a shock. Marvin fought this thing with every bit of strength he had and still made time for his friends and loved ones. You were at his side every moment and I know that brought him great comfort as well.
Rick and Lenny Bruno


Wendy,
I’m so sorry for your sad news, but thank you for sharing it. It was a delight and honor to get to know and work with Marvin – and you – and I’m so glad for the Lakefront Festival poster experience.
Beth Hoffmann, LFOA


Dear Wendy,
Please accept our deepest condolences.
Marvin was a great spirit with true talent beyond explanation. It was a
pleasure to have known him. Your profound thoughts have helped prepare you for
this moment.
I know his spirit will continue through you. Your enthusiasm for him and his gentle spirit will help guide you down a new path. Please know you have many friends who care about you and will help out in any way we can think of. That’s what we’re all here for.
Rest in Peace, Marvin.
Jon and Pat Hecker


Dear Wendy,
Mamie and I were so sorry to hear of Marvin’s passing. We deeply feel the sorrow when it’s time for us to say a last good-bye. In reflecting back on the last time I saw Marvin, he and I sat together at the artist center at Cherry Creek, and I will always remember how he was so positive and upbeat. You know more than any of us what a special person he was and what a tremendous lost this is to our artist family. He will be truly missed.
Dale and Mamie Jo Rayburn


Wendy,
We’ve been speechless since Marvin went away. I have too many conflicting feelings to put any into words that express the turmoil.
We hope you keep on going no matter how hard it is. We need you and the legacy you and Marvin have created need you. You are part of the creative act that came out of Marvin and I don’t think the great art would even have made it onto paper if you hadn’t been there. Your coloring improved the art, too.
Steve Shepard


Wendy,
So sorry to hear about Marvin. I always thought of Marvin as the most creative artists of my peers. His spirit will always be with me and will always encourage and influence my work because of his high level of professionalism.
Mitch and Bea Lyons


I can not tell you how much Marvin will be missed. He will be greatly missed in the art community.
Donna Potts, Brookside Art Fair


Wendy-
I’m so sorry to hear of Marvin leaving us. He’s one of the few artists whose work I would make a special effort to see at a show. I didn’t get to know him well, but the subtle humor and intelligence of the prints has always appealed to me. I’m sure he carried those traits. You may or may not remember that I bought “Unattachment” a few years back, and it will always be a gentle reminder to take life lightly. Please take care of yourself.
Jack Brumbaugh


Dear Wendy,
Yours and Marvin’s work was the first art that I had ever bought from an artist (call me a late bloomer).
I enjoyed talking to Marvin at art shows about the ideas behind his work and about different esoteric
books and subjects. I thought it was so amazing the ideas that were generated and put into art as a result
of the subconscious mind. I also loved the fact that while Marvin was a very talented artist, that he
wasn’t pompous in anyway. He was always glad to take some time to talk with me.
Please let me know the next time you come to a show in Kansas City. I’ll be there!
Peace,
Matt Bailey


Dear Wendy,
I was contacted by a printmaker and member of the MAPC (mid-America print conference) who was looking for “American artists who specialize in linoleum prints” and I immediately thought of Marvin. I was shocked and dismayed after learning that Marvin’s cancer finally got him. I am so sorry for your loss and for the great loss of such a fine artist and printmaker and book collector and press collector and satirist and intellect and on and on. I want to give you a big hug and you can tell me your stories.
Until then, Mary Mark


Wendy,
It was with much sorrow I read your note. Marvin was one of the great thinkers and creators for this generation. I hope his work continues to spark inspiration in others. I am glad likewise to have gathered a few moments with him, and to collect some of his thoughts during your art trips to St. Louis. His style will always be a positive influence to my own work, a model to try and achieve.
David-Glen Smith


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

Memorial to Denny Davis

Our fellow art-fair artist, abstract painter, Denny Davis of Gary, Indiana died a few hours ago. He had a stem-cell transplant a few weeks ago as a last chance to survive. There were complications. Details later. Please share with fellow artists.
— Nancy Camden


Denny Davis, who battled leukemia for a number of years, died on January 3, 2010. He was a wonderful abstract acrylic painter from near Gary Indiana and will be missed greatly by hundreds in the art community.
— Elaine Lanoue


Denny was an amazing inspiration to anyone who knew him. He fought the good fight with feistiness and humor and I will forever miss his presence in my life and at shows. His paintings were like fire and his ability to continue painting throughout his illness is what kept him going. RIP Denny!
You were a one of a kind human being!
— Patricia Hecker


I have known Denny, casually, for decades. I had the pleasure of having the booth next to him at the Bruce Museum Show this Fall. We had some great conversations. He kept me laughing for the entire weekend. What a great sense of humor. I was looking forward to being next to him next year if we were both in the show. Thanks, Denny, for letting me know you a little better! I guess I’ll have to wait a while to be next to you at a show.
— Rick Preston


I met Denny Davis, the first year I did Coconut Grove , every bit of 20 years ago. He still had wooden toys and was a great neighbor.
I was so excited to be in the BIG LEAGUES , i was pretty overwhelmed by what I saw as worldly sophiticates all around me. I had been doing “shows” since 1975 but of the mall variety, and was known for my stirring reditions of snauzers and other unruly beasts, including two-year olds from life.

Yes I was a portrait artist. If any one wonders about the mooching quality of my sheep faces…

But there I was soooo excited to be where the streets were surely paved with gold.My brand-new light dome had that new from the box , fresh plastic smell. At breakdown a huge 300 lb guy , sitting in his food vender truck , with his large crew found my awning to be in his way and was shoving it .

So having spent some of my formative years in NYC I was naturally offering to drag the guy out of his truck and beat him up.
Denny hearing the raucus ( and quite possibly some foul language,my bad,) came out from behind his booth to intercede.
He got between us and saved the day and no virgin light domes or food venders were harmed.My hero.

Denny was the kind of guy to have your back, hold you back in a losing fight, or just listen.

Later in 2008 he told me about his illness, and who knew that there were thousands of jokes about cancer? One that sticks in my mind was “why do they nail the lids on coffins? So the doctors can’t give you anymore Chemo!

Just last October,at the Bruce, a group of us had a loud discussion of politics,at dinner , and I am proud to say I agreed with Denny 1000%.

I miss him so much.
— Beth Crowder


Dear friends I was an architecture classmate of Denny’s at Miami University, Class of ’65 and am very sorry to learn he has passed away. I briefly re-connected with Denny by email some years ago, having previously heard about his antiwar exploits in the army. He told me he had become quite a successful artist, turning out and marketing the kind of painting shown on the memorial site, which brought a healthy but not excessive income. I guess he found it more satisfying than practising architecture, in which he was very good as a student.

Since I was an active war resistor and political exile myself, Denny came to my attention and admiration for his bravery in the 70s, soon after he wrote “GI Joe’s a Red” a copy of which is difficult to get hold of now.


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

2004 NAIA Artist Conference

(561-586-0764) explains some of the great reasons for choosing Lake Worth, in the following excerpt from a post she made on the NAIA Member Forum:

I think the hope was that this Conference would draw in artists with down time between shows, and Lake Worth is an affordable, pleasant location. I hope those of you who read this (that will be in Florida) will consider attending as we have tried to pick a location that will be enjoyable as well as beneficial to you. Those who will fly in – thank you for your support and taking the financial plunge to show your committment to the NAIA and the conference. I know this won’t be the conference for everyone – I’m sorry that it may exclude some of you, but as the Logistics planner of this conference I felt the ambience of a small artistic community won out over a large urban concrete jungle. Lake Worth is close as I could get to a laid back “Retreat” that I could find and make it economically acceptable to a large group of artists. In no way was it ever a thought to exclude ANY group or person from attending. Its our life as it seems to always be missing something due to our “work”—how many weddings, parties, plays… have you had to decide to not attend due to show schedule? I missed last year’s conference because we had a show in Miami. Please keep giving us suggestions for next conference’s (2005) location/time frame —our goal is to be a year ahead in planning. This is in its infancy please be patient with us—–we are just a volunteer organization and trying our best.You wouldn’t believe the hours spent lining this stuff up, I appreciate your concerns on time flying etc but please appreciate the time we spend on working on these projects.I hope the arguments can end here as I hope you will understand there are NO ulterior motives on any of these decisions other than giving all the attendees a great safe fun place to meet. That said…

Lake Worth is on the East coast, about 1 hr and 15 min. north of Coconut Grove, 45 minutes north of Ft Lauderdale, 2 1/2 hrs. from Naples, and 10 minutes from Palm Beach International Airport.

The hotel I selected for the meeting, the Gulfstream, is an old Florida Mizner style hotel which is listed in the Historic Registry and has recently completed renovations. Its on the Intercoastal waterway on a beautiful public park with a health trail, playground, picnic and boating facilities. Across the street is Lake Worth’s public 18 hole 3 par course which is also on the Intercoastal. The Lake Worth Beach is a pleasnt 5 minute walk from the hotel.

Lake Worth has an incredible array of great eats all within walking distance of the hotel. IT’S A SAFE WALK on quiet neighborhood streets lined with palm trees and fascinating architecture. We have a great local art museum in Lake Worth, plus the nearby Norton Museum in West Palm Beach, and the Society of 4 Arts in Palm Beach.

Lake Worth has a very artist friendly mayor and town council that has set up an arts designated area to make it affordable and possible for artists to have home studios open to the public.

Here’s a web page up that will list all bed/breakfast’s in Lake Worth and some cheaper hotel/motel selections, and for those with transportation– Extended Stay type hotels for weekly rates. The Gulfstream Hotel (888-540-0669) has offered us a $99 room or $149 Deluxe Suite which will sleep 4, two TVs, etc. But if you choose to stay elsewhere at a cheaper rate it will be possible.

Also there are about 12 NAIA artists living within the area who will be of great help to attendees and Board with conference.

For campers there’s John Prince Park– a county park on Lake Osborne (lots of recreational stuff) that will take tents and RVs– within 10 minutes of downtown.

US Airways, SouthWest, AirTran, and Jet Blue, to name a few, fly into Palm Beach International and the Hotel provides a complimentary shuttle service from 8 AM to 4 PM daily.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Board member shares with us some of the Board’s additional reasons for this choice. Again, from the member forum:

Dear Members,

I would like to offer some insight into the Board’s decision for the location of our next Artist Conference.

South Florida, with four major shows going on the weekends before and after the Artist Conference dates, became a natural choice. The Lake Worth location was chosen due to its proximity to the airport, and the proximity of the art fairs going on the weekends before and after the conference.

It is important to remember that this is a conference for all artists, not just our members. Keep in mind we WILL be moving the time and location of the Conference every year, and there will be plenty of opportunities to have it in other locations

The Artist Conference Committee is in the process of evaluating agenda ideas, potential speakers and panel discussions. Our working theme is: SURVIVING AND PROSPERING IN CHANGING TIMES, and the very popular MOCK SLIDE JURY from the first Artist Conference will return. Many artists considered the Slide Jury segment as one of the single most beneficial parts of last year’s conference.

We will also go fearlessly where others fear to tread with a segment called Slaying the Digital Dragon, everything you never wanted to know about digital but now need to, in order to meet the evolving application processes.

Additional ideas under consideration will deal with Staying Motivated While Working Alone and New, Different and Potentially Profitable Venues for Artists. The complete agenda, along with detailed logistics, costs, etc., will be announced as soon as possible. Our goal is to provide our members and all artists who attend the conference with as pleasant, informative, productive and stimulating Artist Conference as possible.

We hope to see you there!

The Artist Conference Committee:
Co-Chairs and , along with:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This from member Gail Silverblatt:

“Lake Worth – Where The Tropics Begin” This is the signage that greets all when entering Lake Worth. Here are a few web sites of Lake Worth to help you know this small art city better. The town is a walking paradise of french bakeries, interesting restraunts with outdoor seating of seafood, finnish, italian, japanese, irish, chocolate shops, antiques, dance theater, black box theater, contempory art museum, historical museum, WPA Mural in the post office, wonderful wood 3-D carvings in the library, old-florida style houses is bright tropical colors, shady park with ‘big bands’ and dancing under the stars on the intracoastal,.an easy walk across the bridge to the beach. I could keep going on but you get the idea, everything is within walking distance. The Palm Beach Airport (PBI) is 10 minutes drive, cab was $17 the last time we took one. People seem to liken Lake Worth to the early days of Key West before the tourists all took a piece home with them.

Last summer when booking flights I checked Expedia but found lower prices on Delta’s site. Here is the Palm Beach Airport Flight Guide. Shows which airlines fly when (it’s set for arriving from Milwaukee, just change that on the address bar to your airport).

Forgot to mention Lake Worth also has an upscale blues club The Bamboo Room.
And a ‘Heart Trail’ on the intracoastal in the park across the street from the GulfStream Hotel , so you can indulge in the bakeries and milkshake shop.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hey Everybody!
Here’s a bunch of info I promised on Lake Worth area for conference attendees.

First of all EVERYONE (not just attendees) is invited to Christine Ellinghausen’s (former sidewalk artist/now gallery owner) Color and Light Gallery Tuesday night, Feb 17th from 6:30 to 9:00 for an evening of art and conversation. Christine represents many local and national artists. She has kindly opened up her gallery for us that evening to have a fun place to gather and make dinner plans! There will be a cash bar(everything is a buck) and light snacks provided. The Gallery is i West Palm Beach, south end, about a 10 minute ride from hotel.

Color and Light Gallery 6207 “B”, South Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach (not LW – they both have Dixie addresses.) Five blocks north of Forest Hill Blvd on west side of street. Park on street, behind gallery or Medical Center. 561-632-3698

I’ll be giving out some stuff from Tourist Bureau–Wed but here are some suggestions for Tuesday…..

Lake Worth is loaded with antique stores on Lake and Lucerne Ave.–just park your car/van go up one street and down the other.

We have a great beach, there’s a pier for fishing, or just enjoy the surf. Two restaurants – Benny’s (at the pier) or join the line at John G’s (It’s worth it!) The line moves fast. Do lunch or breakfast, it’s not open for dinner.

John Prince Park at 2700 6th ave. South has canoes,etc for rent plus walking trails, etc.

Golfers – Lake Worth Municipal Golf Club–561-582-9713 for tee times.

Ecotourism – Arthur Marshall Wildlife Refuge, 10216 Lee Road, Boynton Beach (about 20-30min away) call for directions 561-732-3684. The birds are amazing here now – spoonbills ,ibis, egrets, herons. Plus, wait to hear the noise gators use to communicate with each other!

Fun tourist stuff…

DivaDuck tours – A bus that drives right into water and gives tour of West Palm and Intracoastal.561-844-4188. 501 Clematis St, West Palm Beach.

Lion Country Safari – 2 parks/1 price drive-thru Safari then walking zoo.
561-793-1084.

Palm Beach Zoo – Closer to Lake Worth. 23 acres of tropical gardens.
1301 Summit, West Palm Beach
561-533-0887

Palm Beach Casino – spend that Grove money!! 5 hour day cruises–
561-845-2101.

ART STUFF
Palm Beach Institute of Contemporary Art – 601 Lake Ave, Lake Worth
561-582-0006 call for times.

Norton Museum of Art—1451 South Olive, West Palm Beach. Great collection and nice cafe.
561-832-5196

ALSO – there’s a Tropical Flower Show opening in downtown West Palm Beach on 19th along Flagler, its always wonderful, lots of orchids!

DRIVING TOURS
Drive across bridge in Lake Worth head north (left) on Ocean and do the Palm Beach tour! Check out the Million $+ homes. Jed Clampett’s looks mighty frumpy compared to these! Lots of condos first but be patient! You’ll drive past John Lennon’s estate, Jimmy Buffets’, Lily Pulitzer’s, even Mr. EGO/Rush’s home. Of course there’s the Kennedy estate too. Just keep driving north to end of Island to Inlet. Drew Barrymore owns last house on right, ocean side. Check out the Breakers hotel, Mara Lago (Donald Trump’s now, was built by Post cereal family.) There is a public beach here too but bring lots of quarters for high priced meters! The Flagler Museum is worth a visit if you are interested in learning more about this nutty place! Address is Coconut Row and Whitehall Way just south of Royal Poinciana along Intracoastal. It was built as a home by Henry Flagler who brought railroad to Florida.

Things to keep in mind
Lake Worth is a city and the name of the Intracoastal. Also Lake Worth and West Palm both have Dixie Hwy addresses. Just make sure where you are going. Also, it’s Federal Hwy in Lake Worth but it changes name to Olive Ave once you cross into West Palm Beach.

We will have a list of local restaurants for you at registration–but plenty to choose from in Lake Worth. The hotel has very good restaurant/bar (“Digs”) too. Bamboo Room blues club is usually free weekday nites, walking distance of hotel.

Ok, that’s it for now. My index finger is sore – never took typing, two art classes instead. Now I’m paying for it!

See you all soon – safe travels!

Memorial to Paul Matthaei

Paul Matthaei – blacksmith and owner of Old Ellicott Forge in MD. also passed away on Easter. He leaves behind his wife Jennifer and a host of friends from the show circuit in MD, PA, and VA. I will miss him and his big heart. We shared a good number of beers and excellent food at open house patron parties following the Patriot Newsfest in Harrisburg, PA. Those were good years.

Holly Olinger


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

2004 NAIA DIRECTOR CONFERENCE

SAVE THE DATES– SEPTEMBER 27th and 28th, 2004

The NAIA Director Conference will be held September 27th and 28th, 2004 in Kansas City, Missouri. It will immediately follow the Plaza Art Fair, which is held September 24th, 25th, and 26th in the beautiful Country Club Plaza area of Kansas City. Designed in the early 1920’s and patterned after Seville, Spain the County Club Plaza is a premier shopping destination known for its classic architecture, fountains, sculptures, and murals. It is one of the most beautiful locations for an outdoor art event in the country and the Plaza Art Fair has been consistently recognized as one of the highest quality events. This is a Director Conference that you will not want to miss. Save the dates! See what previous attendees have to say.

Invitation, brochure and registration form (PDF file) (Opens new window.)

Agenda (PDF) (Opens new window or right click/save as)

Online Registration for MasterCard and Visa. (Opens new window.)

As details emerge, including the auction, we will be adding more information here, so bookmark this page!

Download the free Adobe PDF Reader

Memorial to Robert Barab

Artist Robert C. Barab Jr., 68, died Feb. 27, 2011 at home. He was the beloved husband of Trilla Ramage of Hampton, VA,father of Sasha Barab of Bloomington, IN, and son of the late Lucilleand Robert C. Barab Sr. Robert was born in Wilmington, DE,Dec. 3, 1942.

An artist, he was an award-winning fine art photographer whotraveled the world to find beauty and share it through his images: http://www.robertbarab.com/ (www.robertbarab.com).

Prior to his careerin photography he was also an award-winning jewelry designer and maker. Agraduate of Goddard College with a BA increative writing, at the time of his death, he was completing a novel.


(Take a look at the last tribute to artist Dale Walters, written by Robert Barab — Sally J. Bright)

Memorial to T. Scott Halpin

After years (at least 4) of dealing with an inoperable brain tumor, Scot had his final seizure on Friday. Robin was with him, holding him, and says he smiled and seemed at peace before he lost consciousness for the last time.

One of Scot’s greatest legacies, along with the hundreds and hundreds of sweet, whimsical, beautiful watercolors and prints, is their son James. Marvin and James were best buds, and were always so glad to spend time together (while Robin and I took care of commerce) talking about monster movies and art. Scot and James had such a special relationship. James was a big help to his dad both emotionally and physically when Scot lost his sense of balance. He’s an interesting, vibrant young man, tall and sensitive like Scot.

If you want to laugh and learn a bit of Rock and Roll trivia, when you Google Scot you can read about the time he was the pitch-drummer for the Who when Keith Moon passed out during a concert in the 70’s. Robin says there’s even footage of it on You Tube!

Rest in peace, Scot. I’m going to miss you.

Wendy


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

SOME EXAMPLES OF POSSIBLE APPROACHES

SOLO ARTIST
Medium: Photography
To maintain the highest standards, I personally perform all the creative aspects involved in my work. I expose each photograph utilizing available light to capture the natural color and beauty of the subject. No filters or additional lighting is used during my image taking. I print each photograph utilizing traditional darkroom techniques and work only from large format (4″ X 5″) or medium format (6cm. X 7cm.) color negatives. These larger negatives have superior clarity resulting in a much sharper print. Each photograph is then mounted and matted using acid-free museum board. I do all this work personally without the use of any apprentices or assistants.

ARTIST WITH ASSISTANCE
Medium: Painting
This Chicago area artist does surrealistic work focusing on city and suburban life. Her paintings reflect a fascination with architectural spaces and the unexpected solitude as well as human activities that occur in them. From this interest her work has evolved to explore the relations between imagination and reality in an urban environment. The process begins with an idea of a place, real or imaginary, and then she will scout out locations for subject matter to be used in the piece.The work proceeds through a series of sketches to a full-sized drawing, which is transferred to canvas. Her technique for the actual paintings involves building up areas of color through the application of many thin layers of transparent paint to achieve vibrant color effects. The artist employs a part time studio assistant, typically an art major at a local college, to help with the many tasks on the work and in the studio that are outside of the creative process.

COLLABORATIVE WORK
Fred and Ginger Morado – A Collaborative Team
Medium: Wood
Using standard woodworking tools and machinery (table saw, bandsaw, routers, jointer, planer, sanders and many handtools) we attempt to create objects that are a pleasure to live with. We use many different woods in typical rough form to begin with. From the first design ideas to the last finishing steps, we both work on each and every piece to emerge from our very small shop. Both have the skills necessary to do any job that is required at any step in the process. Collaboration is another word for a synergistic working environment that has developed over the course of 20 years of working together. No assistants are employed in the creation of our work except for occasional help from our teenage son (sanding).

Memorial to Robert Hutchinson

Dear Sally,
Thanks for including the great pic of Robert in your Art Show Artists website. It is really an incredible task of love and history for the business and artist community at large. We did shows for 24 years on the street in cities across the nation. Our last show was in Nashville (Fall TACA 2003). It is with an ache in my heart to share that Robert died of brain cancer November 13, 2003 (Glioblastoma Multiforme gr. 4) Just to pass along this news. I know alot of our artist friends and acquaintances may not have gotten word of his demise. We (myself and his children Rosie and Henry) are now resurrecting Bob’s Clayworks. We are in the process of reproducing his work in mold and casting in resin, bonded bronze and eventually bronze. Again, thank you for including him.

Sincerely, Louise Hutchinson


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

Memorial to Dale Walters

Dale passed away Monday, June 26, 2006, in a van accident returning home from the Utah Arts Festival in Salt Lake City. A celebration of Dale’s life is being held July 8th immediately following Art Fair on the Square in Madison, Wisconsin.

To all of us touched by the life and saddened by the loss of Dale Walters:

1952-2006
Larger than life in spirit, stature, and stories

Please join together to celebrate Dale’s life following Art Fair on the Square, Saturday, July 8th in Madison, Wisconsin. We’ll share stories, see pictures, celebrate his wonderful spirit, and honor him in a way he would appreciate – with eating, drinking and story-telling.

Details:
The Essen Haus is at 514 E Wilson St.
We’re expected at 6:30 There will be appetizers provided and a cash bar. You can order dinner from the restaurant menu. We will be sharing a digital slide show, if you have any photos that you would like to include please send them to [email protected] We will also be gathering a book of rememberances to share with Dale’s family. Please bring any photos, stories, thoughts etc you would like to pass on. For more information about the memorial contact Chris Dahlquist at or call 816.516.5981 Dale’s website: www.dalebuilt.com


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.


Here is the obituary from Dales hometown paper. This bigger than life artist will be missed. Godspeed.
Patricia Hecker


This hurts my heart. Dale was bigger than life and always had a great smile and jovial laugh. He knew a good resturant when he found one and will be sadly missed. His website has an area called “Out the Window” where he chronicled his day to day life traveling to shows and criss-crossing the country. His parting words were ‘we’ll see you later’.
Patricia Hecker


I didn’t know Dale well, but I have always enjoyed running into him at various art shows. It always seemed he saw the world through a childs eyes – life was filled with mystery, wonder and opportunity. He had as much laughter and many smiles as he had stories – sometimes short . . .sometimes tall . . . but they spoke of his truth and “joi de vivre”.

Over the years I’ve shared show-time with him I have watched his work develop – usually being one step ahead of the norm as an artist. In my opinion, his most recent body of work pushed the medium beyond the edges of the art form – work that challenged my mind to understand.

I am honored to have known this man who was always the best he could be. To me, he was a “celebration”.

Dale, you are in my heart
Adrienne Adam


I am saddened to read this information.

It seems as if I’ve always known Dale… I don’t recall the first time I met him. Over the years, we’ve spoken briefly at some shows and at length at others… I was always taken in by his easy smile and sincerity to what is. It appeared he had worked out solutions for making the most of all situations, whether at shows or in between. He knew how to enjoy the moment.

His friendly ways, joyful demeanor, positive outlook and easy approach to life has and will continue to influence me as I journey forth. Thank you Dale…
Barbara Bouman Jay


I can’t remember how long ago and at what show I met Dale. Once I met him it seemed as though I’d known him for years. He seemed always the same: a great gentle bear of a man who seemed always mellow, always with a wonderful self-reflective sense of humor. He would relate tales of his great drives and the shows he’d done. No matter how hard he worked or how little money he’d made, he never complained about the unfairness of it all. Instead he gloried in his life-style which allowed him to photograph and experiment with new techniques every day. Every time I ran into him I would stop whatever I was doing and try my best to return his great bear hug. I always enjoyed talking with him and never knew when I’d next see him again. When I read of his death on this forum I shouted in pain. I’ve tried not to write about him here but I feel that I owe him some tribute. I’m glad for him that he died quickly. I’m sorry that I’ll never again enjoy the companionship of this friend I so barely knew.

Here is Dale’s website: dalebuilt.com
When I visited his website I found that he doesn’t refer to a “show schedule”. Instead he talks of his “travel schedule”. That was a bit of a surprise for me. Shows are how I make a living. For him they seemed to represent a major part of his life. The larger surprise when I visited his website was the sense I had of the great fatigue he seemed to be experiencing-due (I speculate) to the driving, gruelling show schedule, and the increasingly difficult and time-consuming setup and teardown at almost all shows. It occurred to me that this might have led him into the final accident which ended his life. I regret that I’ll never again get a chance to spend quality time with Dale Walters.
Robert Barab

Memorial to Keith Lebenzon

I was sad to hear that Kieth (AKA “The Brushman”) died in Sept. I found out in an odd way. Someone called for Portland who bought my work at his estate sale. She had not known him. All my work carries my URL on the bakc so it was easy for her to find me.

Kieth was a master salesman, with a near perfect product for craft shows. He could fly in anywhere with a few suitcases, rent a table and drape get to work. He used humor effectively along with a keen sense of body language and a well-honed repretoire of patter. I will miss seeing him at fairs and know that I could have learned much more from him than I did.

– Jim Rosenau

His work is here.


I found this obituary online here.

– Cynthia Davis


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

Memorial to Joseph LaPierre

We are all so saddened to have lost our dear, talented friend, Joe. I never saw Joe without a smile on his face which indicated his happy, too-short life. I have many of his beautiful paintings and cherish each and every one of them — I get so many compliments on their beauty from friends who visit. There’ll never be another one like Joe, and we are proud and privileged to have been associated with him, Melody, Jesse and Sarah for many years. May God bless them and comfort them in the days to follow. Joe will always be in our hearts and prayers.

Vida Burger, Roger and Ron Burger, Jane and Dave Dew.


Local artist Joe LaPierre, beloved husband, father, musician, friend of many, was suddenly taken home to meet his Lord on Tuesday, August 4th, 2009. Joseph was well known in many circles of life, loved and respected in all of them.

He and his wife, Melody, have lived in Palm Beach County since 1980, and became residents of Palm Beach Gardens in 1989 after their son Jesse was born, soon to be followed by their daughter Sarah.

Joe gave to his community in a multitude of ways. His paintings can be found in many homes and offices locally and across the state of Florida, as well as up and down the east coast of the United States and dispersed to a variety of national and international locations. He felt privileged to be able to provide for his family by doing something that he loved…….painting.

His paintings were like him, larger than life, bright, and uplifting in nature. As do many artists, he tried a variety of venues over the years, but found his niche with a palette knife, which remained his primary tool for the past twenty-plus years. He created thick textured paintings that, while loose in style by the nature of the knife, were scenes that were easily recognizable and readily enjoyed.

Joseph supported his community. He was always ready to contribute his artwork to help local organizations, including the fundraising causes of the Loxahatchee River Historical Society and Jupiter Lighthouse, Artigras, Sunfest, and Celebrities Fore Kids. He also gave artwork to many other schools, churches, and clubs to help in raising money to promote their charity or to support teaching art to students. He would do demonstrations, teaching as he painted, and also gave his “Art Festivals 101” class to artists just starting out, giving them instructions and helpful hints based on his wealth of experience gained over the years of finding how to successfully sell his paintings at art festivals and galleries.

He was honored to be selected as the poster artist for several prominent art festivals such as Artigras, Artfest by the Sea, Hobe Sound Festival of the Arts, and several times for the Venice Arts Festival. He always had fun creating something that he thought was appropriate for the event and yet expressive of his style.

Joe was a recognized musician before he took to painting full time, know by many in the area for his role as singer/composer in the “Mike’s Towing Band”. The group performed locally in the early 80’s and had a following that continues to this day, even though the last official performance was long ago.

In addition to paintings that can be valued and enjoyed for generations to come by those who are fortunate enough to own them, Joe’s legacy is one of integrity, encouragement and enthusiasm. His children, Jesse and Sarah, were his pride and joy, and though he gave without reservation to many, his first priority was his family. He
regarded his children as his greatest legacy.

Thank you to those who knew him for your expressions of kindness and love for him (and his family..we were a team effort, you know). Please feel free to share your memories with us, as there were many folks whose lives he touched without announcing it to anyone. It was just his way. His Facebook page will be kept active and his website will be updated from time to time as we continue to carry on with our lives and make decisions in the days ahead. His last collection of available paintings is on hold at this time, and may be made available when the timing seems right. We, his family, know that his memory will be kept alive as people continue to enjoy his paintings and recall their memories of Joe.

Though we feel an incredible void without him and will miss his expertise in so many areas, we are thankful for the time we were granted with him as husband, father, and friend. We are also thankful that since it was apparently his time to go, he went quickly and did not have to suffer.

A memorial service is being planned for Joe. When the date and location have been arranged, it will be posted on his website, Facebook page, and other venues to let any who wish to attend know the details. Many people have asked what they can contribute in lieu of flowers or other memorials in honor of Joe’s memory. We ask only for your prayers for strength and peace for us in the days ahead and that if you have special memories of Joe, you share them with us. If you feel a need to make a contribution, we are certain that Joe would prefer that you direct it to his greatest legacy, his children, who were more dear to his heart than any other charity. Providing for their future would have remained his focus were he still alive and painting today. Memorial gifts thus directed will be transferred to an account set up for use in future needs of Jesse and Sarah, one of whom is already in college, while the other is about to begin that adventure.

Such memorial gifts can be directed to:
Melody LaPierre
669 Holly Drive
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410

“Joseph, we celebrate your ‘joie de vivre’, and look forward to seeing you in eternity.”
Love, Melody, Jesse, and Sarah

May God grant us all strength in our individual challenges.


It is with deep sadness that I inform you that on Tuesday, August 4, 2009 at 8:00pm, artist Joseph LaPierre passed away.

Joe LaPierre was an incredible artist who was truly dedicated to giving back and making a difference in his community. He participated in ArtiGras for more than 20 years and was always helping us to improve our show and mentor others. Joe donated several original paintings to ArtiGras to auction off to raise funds for local school art programs. He also helped mentor all of the artists in the ArtiGras Emerging Artist Program, many of whom are now pursuing their dreams of making a career in the art show industry. We were very privileged that last year Joe created the original artwork for the ArtiGras 2009 Commemorative Poster, ?An Artist?s Life? ? a print symbolic of everything that was important to him. Joe always said, ?To be an artist is to always be learning.? Through his donations of time and knowledge, he taught many aspiring artists who will always remember his great example of giving back to your community.

Joe leaves behind his wife Melody and children, Jesse and Sarah. Joe?s business was a family business and his wife and children were always working art shows with him. Please keep his family in your prayers during this difficult time.

I am honored that Melody has asked that we help plan a memorial for Joe in late August. As soon as we have the date, time and location confirmed I will let you know. For more information on Joe and his work, you can visit his website at www.joelapierre.com.

Suzanne Neve
the ArtiGras Art Show
Director of Programs and Services
Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

Become a Member of the NAIA!

“The mission of the NAIA is to strengthen, improve and promote the artistic, professional and economic success of artists who exhibit in art shows. We are committed to integrity, creativity, and the pursuit of excellence as we advocate for the highest ideals and practices within all aspects of the art show environment.”

Begun in 1995, the NAIA serves as an advocate for artists. It is committed, by positive and cooperative means, to promote improvement throughout our profession. The NAIA has become the artists’ collective and most effective voice as it continues to grow and gain recognition. We work hard to serve our membership and to foster working partnerships with other arts organizations. We encourage your involvement.

What does the NAIA Do?
The NAIA provides a forum for artists to communicate with one another and with other people in the arts community.  We support existing community-based shows to make/keep them a viable market for selling art and crafts. In addition, we work with select communities to establish high quality new shows. We work toward developing educational programs for artists as well as alternative markets for members providing support for artists in whatever stage of their career.

Who is the NAIA?
The NAIA is YOU! The NAIA is primarily a volunteer-based organization of artists just like yourself. The board, along with the Executive Director, directs the efforts through input from the membership while many other volunteers assist in providing the people power to accomplish those goals.

The NAIA maintains two classes of membership: Artist members and Contributor members.

Artist Membership
Artist membership is open to artists who design and produce their own work and derive a significant portion of their income from the sale of their art. Two artists at the same address may join for the price of one! Artist members receive:

? NAIA newspaper ?The Independent Artist? (mailed)
? NAIA member E-newsletter, ?NaIA: News and Information for Artists?
? Original NAIA Member Forum
? NAIA Show Information Forum on the Web
? NAIA Advocacy Action Line
? NAIA Online Member Roster
? Over 20 discount programs to save you money!

Contributor Membership
NAIA Contributor Memberships are open to individuals, organizations, art festivals and publications that are interested in supporting the mission, goals and activities of the NAIA.

? NAIA newspaper ?The Independent Artist? (mailed)
? NAIA member E-newsletter, ?NaIA: News and Information for Artists?
? Discounts to our respected Directors Conferences
Recognition on the NAIA web site
? Original NAIA Member Forum
? New NAIA Member Forum

Why should I become a member of the NAIA?
We have listed many benefits and discounts above, but the most important reason to become a member of the NAIA is to add your personal voice to the collective efforts of the NAIA. Your voice will assist in effecting positive change and improvements within our art show industry. Your financial support is integral to the success of these efforts. The NAIA Membership Committee looks forward to welcoming you as a member!

The NAIA Logo: We do promote the use of the NAIA name in conjunction with the standardized slide and digital slide formats. However, the name or logo of the NAIA may not be used as an endorsement for either artist or contributor members without our written approval. Thank you!

2007 DIRECTOR CONFERENCE ONLINE REGISTRATION

Thank you for registering for the 2007 NAIA Director Conference!

Conference fee includes 2 deluxe continental breakfasts and two lunches.

We are happy to offer secure, encrypted on-line registration with your Visa or MasterCard (only.)

NAIA Contributing Members:
1st Person: $285.00
2nd Person from the same organization: $210.00
Subsequent person from same organization: $190.00
NAIA Contributing Membership, New or Renewal Fee: $95.00

Non-Members:
1st Person: $385.000
2nd Person from the same organization: $310.00
Subsequent person from same organization: $290.00

Like to join first? Go to the Membership page.

If you would prefer to print out a registration form and mail in, click on the link to the PDF file to your left.

2007 NAIA Director Conference Registration
(Note: Unless you specifically know that your NAIA Membership is up to date, it has probably expired and you will need to renew to receive the Member rate.)
(EARLY Registration Options available though April 30 only)

Companion names if applicable: 
Additional information
First time conference attendee?
Yes
NoAre you a member of IFEA?
Yes
No

If “yes” and you were encouraged to register by another attendee, please list the name of the show and director that encouraged you to attend

Food Preferences (check one)
(We will offer a vegetarian selection. We will also do our best to accommodate other food preferences but cannot fully guarantee complete accommodation.)
Not picky
Vegetarian
Other   
“I’ve Got a Question”
Please list any questions or issues that you may want to bring up during the Open Agenda portion of the conference for discussion and feedback by those in attendance. Alternatively, if reasonable, we may try to incorporate your issues into the scheduled presentations.
1.  
2.  
3.  
In order to let other show directors know who else is planning to attend the conference, we would like to keep a running list of registrants on the Director Conference registration page on our website. Not only can this help generate enthusiasm, but it can help you to make arrangements with other directors to perhaps share transportation, accommodations, or just simply to hook up before the conference and converse. Do you give your permission to have your show name listed on the registrant page?
(Check one)
Yes
No
   
After you submit your registration, please email a copy of your show’s logo to [email protected] so that we can include it on your conference nametag and table card. Thank you.

Westaf Presentation

From a Meeting Convened to Discuss the Feasibility of Cooperative Art Fair Applications and the Use of the Internet to Introduce Jurying Efficiencies

Prepared by WESTAF (Western States Arts Federation)
1543 Champa Street, Suite 220
Denver, Colorado 80202

These notes are neither minutes nor a transcription of the meeting. Rather, they are a reporting of the major points of discussion. Because the group was largely in consensus on the items discussed, the names of the individuals making various points are for the most part not reported.

In Attendance Larry Oliverson, Executive Director, NAIA; Shary Brown, Director Ann Arbor Street Art Fair; and Stephen King, Director of the MAIN ST. Fort Worth Arts Festival. Matthew Saunders, WESTAF Director of Technology and Anthony Radich, WESTAF Executive Director. Absent but participating in the organization of the meeting and in a review of the meeting’s discussion points was Bruce Storey, former Director of Denver’s Cherry Creek Arts Festival.

Opening Comments
Radich opened the meeting and noted that the gathering was designed to be a communication and brainstorming session, not a decision-making session. He remarked that the meeting’s outcome was far from pre-ordained and suggested that the recommendations that might emerge from the meeting would need to be considered by many other parties. In addition, he stated that any action that might evolve from the meeting would need to meet the test of providing a visible benefit to art fair management, artists, and WESTAF. He stated that WESTAF had an interest in the project because the organization was broadly committed to increasing audiences for the arts. He stated that the WESTAF staff viewed art fairs as an excellent means by which to accomplish this in the area of the visual arts.

Oliverson commented on the interest of artists in developing a more efficient application process. He noted that many artists were expending considerable time completing multiple application forms to art fairs when a universal form, especially one that could be accessed online, would be far more efficient. He called the group’s attention to the elements of a cooperative form the NAIA had prepared.

Brown noted that there were two distinct projects on the table. She identified one as the development of a universal application form and the other as the development of an online jurying process. She noted that the universal application form project was closer to realization than was the online jurying function. Regarding the universal application form, she reported that there was considerable field-wide agreement regarding its format and content. She advised the group to consider the online jurying project to be a related but separate matter.

Brown and King noted that both fair managers and artists had many questions regarding the efficacy of an online jurying system. They stated that such a system could only be introduced after many of the issues surrounding its construction and use were resolved. The group agreed that the overlap or nexus between the two projects should not be lost sight of but that the projects should be considered separately. The group concurred that online jurying was ultimately likely to become standard practice. They advised that the field should work toward such an eventuality and be prepared to knowledgeably adopt such services once they become generally accepted.

The Technological Capacity of Organizations and Artists The group voiced concern that many art fair offices operate with outdated and/or inadequate hardware and software. They stated that many art fair sponsors had a limited financial ability to acquire improved hardware and that the provision of adequate training to operate more sophisticated software would be needed. The point was made that the implementation of any online universal application and/or jurying system would need to occur with the understanding that the field has many different levels of knowledge in the area of technology and a panoply of hardware and software systems.

In order to speed adoption of a cooperative application, the group suggested that consistent terms and working definitions be set down to ensure that those advising on the development of the cooperative form and/or jurying process are speaking the same language.

Artists were also identified as a group that has highly varying degrees of technological sophistication and very diverse hardware. The issue was raised that not every artist has ready access to the Internet. A discussion ensued regarding what the base line expectation regarding access should be for artists. The group consensus was that parallel paper and Internet systems might need to be operated simultaneously for a period of time until access to the Internet becomes more universal. Many believed that rapid adoption of Internet technology would eliminate this potential barrier in a very short period of time.

King reported that last year, the Fort Worth Arts Festival provided the option of an online application and that 8-9% had applied through that means. He noted that additional online applicants were expected in the coming year. King warned, however, that the debugging and perfection of an online system in its first years of operation generally eliminate any cost savings in those years and may actually introduce additional costs. Regarding the need to merge slides with online applications, he noted that this system’s potential for error was large and the risk grew larger as the number of applications increased. He stated that sufficient staff resources must be allocated to such a project.

Demonstration of ArtistsRegister.com
Saunders presented a demonstration of WESTAF’s ArtistsRegister.com project. He noted that, because WESTAF had already invested in the software and personnel costs for the project, the related universal art fair application and jurying projects could be designed and delivered for substantially less than a project started from scratch. The group discussed ways the functionality of the ArtistsRegister.com site could be adapted to accommodate the needs of art fairs.

Presentation of Key Factors in a Uniform Application
The group discussed a PowerPoint presentation made by WESTAF that outlined the possible key elements of a universal art fair application. The presentation was developed from two principal sources: a) the draft uniform application prepared by the NAIA, and b) a review of the applications of ten major art fairs.

Prior to the presentation, the following points were made:

  • All artists would have the option of receiving a CD tutorial detailing ways to effectively use the site. Participating shows may be asked to mail these out to all applicants.
  • The application program would be designed in a manner that would allow for one section to gather the majority of the information needed and the construction of separate “popup” segments that would allow some shows to acquire single show-specific information.
  • General information about the shows the artist is applying to would be provided and links to show sites would be provided. The purpose of these informational efforts is to help the shows maintain their identities and to provide artists with the information they need to make decisions about making application to various shows.

The application elements presented for discussion are listed below.

Elements Common to All Applications

  • Name
  • Business/Studio Name
  • Address
  • City
  • State
  • Zip
  • Check this box if this is a new address
  • Phone (day) (evening)
  • E-Mail (This will be used to notify artists of the receipt of their application
  • Fax
  • Artist’s Web site and space for a second web site

Partners/Collaborators

  • Name of partner/collaborator
  • Statement of how the partner/collaborator has contributed to the work in the work

Services

  • If asked, would you be willing to demonstrate?
  • Auction Donation: yes/no

Promotion

  • Would you send promotional post cards? If so, in what quantity?
  • Would you affix promotion stickers to your own promotional material? If so, in what quantity?

Slide Information Statement

  • 20 words or less with instructions suggesting the focus of the statement be on a description (materials, technique, etc.) of what the jurors are looking at and not on the artist’s overall artistic philosophy/inspiration

Slides

  • 1-7
  • 8 (booth slide)

The participants noted that a provision needs to be made to allow artists to provide up to seven slides of their work and have the option of supplying a booth slide. This would accommodate the fact that some shows require fewer than seven slides and not all show require a booth slide. In addition, provision should be made for the possibility that some shows may eventually request more than seven slides

Category

  • Printmaking
  • Painting
  • Photography
  • Drawing
  • Digital
  • 3D Mixed Media
  • 2D Mixed Media (includes handmade paper)
  • Leather
  • Sculpture
  • Glass
  • Pastels
  • Wood
  • Jewelry (metal)
  • Jewelry (non-metal)
  • Metalsmithing
  • Clay (funtional)
  • Clay (non-functional)
  • Fiber (dolls, baskets

Signature

  • Is there a way to limit the verbiage to which the signatures are affixed? If not, then a system can be designed to accommodate multiple statements. Applicant signature alone or applicant and partner/collaborator?
  • Use a universal statement of originality and authenticity and customized statements for other features.
  • The signature should indicate that the artist has read and agrees to the rules appropriate to the show being applied for and that electronically signing the form represents a binding agreement to abide by those rules.

The group made the following comments about the draft form:

~The order in which items appear on an application can be an important factor when the applications are integrated into the various record keeping systems fairs now have in operation. Changing the order of some items could impose a major burden on many systems and their administration.

~Saunders replied that the system would be built in MySQL software. He explained that such software was quite powerful and allowed the operator to pull information out in a variety of forms and sequences. He further noted that the system was compatible with most existing software data systems. Saunders also explained that MySQL was more robust than Access software in that it could service more simultaneous users without crashing. He further noted that it was a Linux based rather than a Microsoft based system, which was an advantage because the Microsoft product had a reputation for being far more “buggy” than Linux. Saunders then reinforced the fact that the art fair offices would not need to purchase a Linux system as it had the capacity to convert data to other forms.

~Saunders explained the mailing list maintenance capability of any system that would be put into place. He reported that the WESTAF ArtistsRegister.com system provided up-to-date artist mailing lists on demand and had the capacity to identify complex subgroups from the universe represented in the system.

~The group advised that a code field and/or customer number field is needed. Saunders stated that the code could be hidden in a way that only fair administrators had access to it.

~The point was made that none of the fairs would want to lose their individual identities and that precautions needed to be taken to ensure that each fair had an opportunity to maintain and extend its identify. Several noted that the quality image of many shows was critical to their ability to attract quality artists. The group concluded that, because the topic was of central importance, there was a need for a position paper on the subject.

~The point was made that a universal application could detract from the identity of each show. The group discussed the use of popup boxes in the application as a means to differentiate the events. The suggestion was made that such boxes could help the shows maintain their individuality. In spite of this belief, the consensus was that every effort would be made to limit such boxes as they reduce the time savings and general efficiency of the uniform application. The group suggested that, while popup boxes should not be excluded as a means of differentiation, other means needed to be pursued to reinforce the individuality of the fairs. Members of the group noted the value of the prospectus as a marketing tool. Some discussion ensued regarding the many alternative means of building show identity other than through the application form.

~The issue of acquiring an official signature through online means was discussed. Saunders noted that many advances were being made in that area and that more were coming. He stated that, already, an online signature had been awarded the status of being equally valid to that of an original hand signature. He stated that the primary means for such a signature process was the verification of signature via a third party that validates a signature code matching the code assigned.

~The group stated that additional feedback on the application form from a selection of art fairs of all sizes would be necessary prior to a first draft being submitted to the field for comment.

~Slide information statements of 20 words in length or less were thought appropriate for the application. The point was made that such statements should be designed to describe the materials, technique etc. the jurors are looking at and are not intended to be an overarching statement of vision by the artist.

~The group advised that the section related to categories was the most problematic portion of the form. They noted that there was a lack of uniformity across shows regarding categories and that much would need to be worked out in order to become even moderately uniform. The suggestion was made that popup boxes that allow some differentiation may be most appropriate in this area of the application.

~The various kinds of reports that would need to be extracted from a universal application process data were discussed. Some of the report designed search abilities mentioned were: beginning and ending dates; the ability to make weekly/daily dumps of information; addresses; and timetables.

~The ability to add a second name to the form was considered important. Similarly, the group thought space for a second URL should be made available.

~The group advised that the system should have the ability to capture show-specific data such as willingness to demonstrate and willingness to participate in an auction. The consensus was that of significant importance was the disclosure of the request for such services and the disclosure of the implications of complying and not complying with that request. The group indicated that provision of electronic spaces for these functions should not be construed as an endorsement of their practice.

~Core application registration information should be on the first page of the application to ensure easy reference. The group further recommended that every effort be made to format the application on a single page to avoid turning the page either via computer or in paper form.

~The group referenced the draft universal application proposed by the NAIA and noted that artists should be heavily involved in the testing of any application. The group further noted that the organization of the application should be such that it is a step-by-step easily followed process.

~A detailed discussion was held regarding ways that customized information for certain shows could be included in the universal application. The WESTAF staff suggested the use of radio buttons. Such buttons, they stated, would allow easy navigation within the application site and give artists the opportunity to select shows that require additional information than that required on the universal application.

~The application and the application process need to enable artists to adjust the visual materials referenced in the applications to reflect the type of art preferred by each show.

~The application process needs to allow for the phenomenon of artists applying to one set of shows and deciding which shows to apply to next based on their early acceptances and/or rejections. Some discussion was held as to what additional charges an artist may incur if they were to apply multiple times rather than a single time. Another factor that they advised be built in is the ability of an artist to select another show if they are rejected from another that occurs on the same date.

~Consideration needs to be given to time sequencing. How long a submitted application remains active, when the overall application season begins, and when subsegments of the year conclude are all factors that remain to be worked out.

~Care must be taken to limit what is requested in each application. The point was made that the more that is asked for, the less likely the form is to be accurately and completely filled out.

~Detailed information about the shows needs to be in the system. Such information would be designed to help the artists decide if they should enter a particular show and what they should expect in terms of an experience if they do. Information included should range from sales reports to load-in maps to accommodation options.

~The system could be designed to allow artists to e-mail notices and images about specific shows to their customers and contacts. Such an e-mailing should have the capacity to be segregated by geographic area and other delimiters.

~The application should contain a clear explanation that the requested artist’s statement is a statement about the work presented for jurying, not a general artist’s vision statement.

~Six images and a booth image were deemed adequate for the universal application. Although some shows do not use a booth slide, inclusion of the slide in the universal application was not thought to disadvantage artists.

~The application system must have the capacity to manage artists’ show priorities.

~An attempt should be made to make the general release statement as standard as possible. Understanding that this will be difficult, provisions need to be made to include release statements, or portions of such statements, that can not be standardized. The hope is that at the least, a core release statement could be devised and that differentials could be accommodated thorough the use of popup boxes.

~The statement of originality needs to be retained even though the enforcement of the commitment remains a challenge.

~A number of fair administrators will need a system with the capacity to process a very high volume of applications within a very short period of time.

~In order for the system to be of greatest utility, it must reduce the significant costs of processing applications.

~Application deadlines or master deadlines need to be structured so as not to disadvantage those who apply to multiple shows.

~If application deadlines need to be changed to accommodate a universal application, shows need to start moving in that direction prior to the introduction of the system.

~No one in the group was aware of a deadline study, however all agreed that such a study should be conducted.

~A suggestion was made that all deadlines be allocated into three or four annual periods. In this scenario, all shows would be asked to select the deadline that best met their needs.

~There is general agreement in the field regarding the contents of a universal application. The group noted, however, that devising an online jurying process would likely prove to be much more of a challenge.

Discussion of Online Jurying
Recognizing that the field was not in consensus regarding online jurying, the group discussed some of the factors that needed to be considered when designing such a process.

~The quality of the images placed on the Internet remains a key concern of artists and managers alike. Saunders noted recent and soon-to-be available advances in image quality that will address some of these concerns. He suggested that within a few years, the quality of images on the Internet would likely be high enough to be universally accepted as a medium for jurying.

~When the topic of remote online jurying was discussed, the group voiced three major concerns: a) The possibility exists that persons not part of the jurying process but in the room when the juror reviews images at home or in a place of work could influence the juror. b) When in a group, juror conversation can enrich and often improve the outcome of the jurying process-this is not available through an online, remote process. c) Fair management can learn a great deal about the artists and their art by directly observing the work of the jury. Such a process also allows the fair director to be more effective in public relations and publicity efforts.

~Because artists do not send the same suite of images to all shows, there is a need to design a process that allows adjustments to the image mix submitted to each show. If the jurying moved to an online format, one strategy that was recommended was the submission of a universe of slides to the application site and the designation of specific slides for submission to specific shows. Saunders suggested that the program be set up so that artist users have passwords that allow them to return to the site and make changes to the pool of slides and the designation of images for specific shows.

~How artists feel about on-line jurying is an important consideration. If they are not comfortable they may avoid shows that use the system.

~A suggestion was made that, until Internet image quality is sufficient for use throughout the jurying process, the online process could be used to select finalists whose works would then be juried via slide or though enhanced electronic means that are as good as or better than a slide image.

~The issue of the ability of artists to manipulate slides to their advantage was discussed. Although the group voiced concern about this possibility, the point was made that the ability to manipulate slides through electronic and other means already exists. Further discussion about this possibility was considered advisable, however, many thought the possibility for abuse in this area would grow no matter what method was used for image presentation.

~Because some fairs use multiple jurys, any electronic system must have the capacity to service such a system.

~A way must be found to ensure that online jurors select artwork that reflects regional character and the taste of the public visiting certain shows.

~Issues of confidentiality in the jurying process need to be made explicit and accommodated in an online system and its administration. Such confidentiality needs to be maintained both between shows and among artists.

What does WESTAF Get out of the Project?
In response to a question regarding what WESTAF gets out of the project Radich listed the following:

~The project has the potential to expand the reach and use of ArtistsRegister.com.

~WESTAF is committed to developing infrastructure for the nonprofit arts organizations that introduces efficiencies and builds the net revenues of those organizations.

~WESTAF is working with public arts interests in the area of online jurying. The jurying aspect of this art fairs project is of interest as a way to gain additional experience in the area of the dynamics of jurying.

Concluding Comments
~The Visual Arts Affinity Group has helped shows feel more comfortable about sharing and cooperating. This has helped establish a positive environment for the design and acceptance of a universal application.

~Artist and show management communication has improved in recent years and this has made the design and use of a universal application more feasible.

~The ArtShowJury.com project is a commercial venture that needs to be communicated with prior to the development of an online jurying system.

~The manner in which the application process can be managed and funded remains an open question. WESTAF is willing to take some steps toward the development of the application but needs to identify approximately $25,000 in hard costs in order to complete the project.

~In the long term, WESTAF would like art fairs to consider encouraging artists to use the ArtistsRegister.com project whether for jurying or another means.

~WESTAF believes that its substantial investment in extant online sites can save art fairs substantial money in the work to design and implement a universal application.

OLD TOWN ART FAIR MEETING


Dear Artists and Craftspersons:
On Sunday morning, June 11, 1995, a group of approximately twenty-five Old Town Art Fair artists and artisans met informally in the Old Town Triangle Association building to discuss concerns and interests regarding the current state of affairs in the art/craft world. Included in the discussion were such topics as artist safety at shows, the decline of some major shows, establishing new venues in major markets, opening up channels of communication between artists and show committees, the need for artists to have a published vehicle of communication that would be national in scope, and (even) the lack of a nationally accepted standard for jury slides. The result of this was the suggestion that artists and artisans across the country be queried about the possibility of forming a nation-wide independent artists association.

Photographer and publisher of the Art Fair Sourcebook, Greg Lawler, stated that there are at least 5,000 artists and craftspersons exhibiting at shows across the country. Another artist noted that according to statistics recently released, approximately 67% of the nations adult population attends at least one outdoor art activity a year, a figure that exceeds attendance for professional sports activities. Photographer Gordon Bruno accurately noted the lack of fine art festivals in the East. “From Baltimore to Boston there is a population of forty million people and not one major art festival.” He went on to suggest that it would be wonderful for artists to have an organization that could approach promoters about opening new shows. Cherry Creek and the new show in St. Louis (Clayton) were cited as examples.

Painter and printmaker Dale Rayburn discussed the positive results that have been generated by the Atlanta Arts Festival’s recently created “Artist Advisory Board.” He stated that, “These are local artists who exhibit at the big shows. They work with the Atlanta Arts Festival and help both the artists and the sponsoring organization in whatever way they can.” As a result, the shows committee has become more artist oriented and communication between both participants and sponsors has greatly improved. At most shows, artists are given questionaires by the committees sponsoring the shows, but what happens to them? In many cases they appear to go unread. Wouldn’t it be great if every show committee had artist representives expressing our needs and concerns in the same type of win-win fashion exhibited at the Atlanta show?

Therefore, the group concluded that an Association of ArtFestival Artists might be an idea whose time has come. The three most compelling ideas that emerged were:

  1. Working to expand major art shows into major metropolitan areas that currently don’t have any. Examples would include New York City, Philadelphia, Boston, Washington D.C., etc.
  2. Encouraging a program to establish category advisory groups to represent artists concerns to show committees/sponsors.
  3. Establishing a newsletter to gather independent artists from all over the country into a community where we can exchange ideas, concerns, opinions, information, advise and help.

What’s important now is your thoughts. This is a new idea and while it’s in its infant stage, remember that all great ideas and all great organizations started in just this same way. Please approach this new concept with a positive posture; speak with your friends and neighbors in the field, give the possibilities some serious thought, and informally write down both your musings, ideas and suggestions. Finally, send them to one of the artists listed below, talk to us at a show, or give us a call. We look forward to both your input and help.

Lynne Krause
Gordon Bruno
Ginny Herzog
Bob Brudd
Rick Preston
Kathleen Eaton

Memorial to Scott Davis

One of our great friends — Scott Davis passed away October 2005 shortly after St. James Court 2005. His brother Berry (his partner) is continuing in the glass studio. Thought you’d like to know. Maybe you could keep him up for a while so that those people who don’t know of his passing might learn. It is still hard for Berry to tell the story to those who hadn’t heard yet.

Scott had a smile that would light up the sky and a real jovial demeanor. We will greatly miss him in our travels. He passed on October 21, 2005 of a sudden heart attack during an evening nap at his home. He was 47. His brother Berry will continue with Neptune Glass a studio they both had operated. Berry has Collette Fortin working with him in the studio.

Kindest regards
Ronnie & Chris Hughes


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

DIGITAL JURY IMAGE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ART SHOWS

By Larry Berman and Chris Maher

There are many excellent reasons for shows and artists to embrace the digital jury process. For shows, advantages include the potential to automate the application process, greatly simplify the handling and management of hundreds, or even thousands of submitted images, and tremendously reduce the time and effort required to collate and analyze the scoring data that the jury produces. For artists, the digital jury process can make it easier and faster to apply to shows as well increasing the accuracy with which their work is presented to the jury. Additionally, artists could receive valuable feedback from shows that are using a digitally system to score applicants.

There are several issues that need to be addressed to insure that a digital jury is a positive thing for both the shows and artists. Our recommendations begin with practical considerations and then address the technical issues.

Practical Considerations

Perhaps the single largest factor that will speed or inhibit the wide use of the digital jury process is adoption of a standard image submission format. If artists are required to produce digital jury images in different formats to apply to each show, the result may be confusion and reduced applications. Shows that do not specify the exact image requirements of their system or plan to resize images, give the artist little or no control over the quality of their images. A standard format will keep time, effort and costs down for artists, improve the quality and accuracy of the artist’s jury images and will reduce the number of incorrectly prepared images that shows will receive. A widely accepted standard may even have the potential to increase the number of applications that shows receive.

A standard submission format will also reduce the fear and uncertainty that less technically adept artists may have toward the new process. If standards vary widely, or are not clearly stated, even technically sophisticated artists may decide not to submit an application, fearing that they would be wasting their jury fee because the process would not fairly represent their artwork to the jury.

No matter what process a show ultimately decides on, artists who are considering applying to a digitally juried show should have access to detailed information that will allow them to properly prepare their digital images so the digital images accurately represent their art work.

Technical Recommendations

File type, image size, color space, and the color temperature and gamma of the display device all play a critical role in the accurate display of digital images. For those who have no experience in color management these factors may initially be confusing, but are actually fairly simple to deal with. What follows is a discussion of how those factors will affect the accuracy and quality of submitted digital images, as well as our recommendations for optimum settings.

Image type and size

Because image files can be quite large, they are usually compressed before transmission over the internet. We recommend that the baseline JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group) be the standard file format that shows ask for. JPEG’s are readable by all programs and browsers and are the most efficient way for artists to send images to shows. Even with minimum compression, files submitted as JPEGs will be relatively small and simple to transmit and store.

Image size is critical because changing the size of a JPEG has the potential to significantly degrade it. If an artist knows the actual resolution that their images will be displayed at they then can optimize their images for that size and be confident that the jury will see those images with the quality intended. Most new digital projectors use the XGA standard (1024×768 pixels) as their native resolution, and 1024 pixels wide by 768 pixels high is also the most common desktop monitor resolution. Unlike slide projectors that can project both horizontal and vertical images, most digital output devices are restricted to displaying a horizontal format. Taking all these factors into account we are recommending shows standardize on one of two image sizes. Both would allow artists to submit horizontal, vertical or square images, selecting the aspect ratio that would show their work accurately, knowing the jurors would have no problem viewing their images fairly in comparison to other submissions.

  1. Digital jury images can be submitted as JPEGs sized so the longest dimension is 700 pixels. Although the maximum number of pixels devoted to the image could in theory be as high as 768, most programs that display images have menus and tool bars on screen that reduce the actual number of pixels available for the image itself.
  2. Digital jury images can be submitted as JPEGs using the 1920 pixel square format specified by the ZAPPlication™ digital jury system. Thousands of artists have already prepared digital images for ZAPP™ that can be viewed using equipment such as the Roku media player and a digital projector. Viewing of 1920 pixel square images need not be limited to specific hardware as long as the program used fits image to screen, which is usually the default setting when showing an image larger than the viewing device’s native resolution.

Please note that when describing the dimensions of an image that will be displayed electronically the only size element that actually is meaningful is the number of actual pixels. DPI (dots per inch) and PPI (pixels per inch) are terms that are only meaningful for images that are outputprinted on paper.

Color Space: A color space describes the actual gamut, or range of colors that can be displayed. Our recommendation is that shows require that images submitted be prepared in the sRGB color space. sRGB (standardized Red Green Blue) is the default color space for viewing images on a monitor and in a browser. It is also the default color space for most digital cameras and projection devices. If an image is prepared in a larger or smaller color space than the display space, the result can be a washed out or darker than intended image.

Color Temperature: Also called white balance, color temperature refers to the color of gray at different levels from black to white. The default color temperature for sRGB is 6500 Kelvin. Many monitors are set to between 7000 toand 12000 degree color temperatures when shipped, as higher color temperatures cause the monitors to appear brighter when seen on a showroom floor. Correction to the 6500 degree standard can be easily made to most monitors and projectors using on screen adjustments. We recommend that shows adjust their monitors and digital projectors to 6500 degrees Kelvin before a jury process begins.

Gamma: Gamma Iis the relationship between the voltage input and the brightness of a monitor. Monitors compensate for gamma to show the desired gray values. A Gamma of 2.2 is the standard settings for monitors in the PC world. Macintosh computers default to a gamma of 1.8. Images prepared using a monitor with a different gamma than the one used by the juror will either look washed out or too dark. We recommend that shows use equipment set to the Windows standard gamma of 2.2, and that they instruct artists applying to their show that they need to prepare their images using a monitor gamma toof 2.2

Conclusion

It is our hope that standards will emerge that will make the digital jury process a simple, reliable way for artists to accurately show their work for judging by show juries.

Whatever image specifications you decide on, artists applying to your show will need to know the details so they can properly prepare their images. The more the artists (or those they hire to prepare their images) know of your system, the more accurately their work will be presented to your jury.

And though we may not have stressed it enough, whatever image size you ask for should be able to display both horizontal and vertical jury images equally, not requiring scrolling to see the image in it’sits entirety if viewed in a browser. Just because the most common display devices use 1024×768 resolution, asking for that 1024×768 size will display horizontal images approximately 33% larger than vertical images.

“THE NAIA 2009 STIMULUS PLAN: PROJECT ART!” ONLINE ** EARLY ** REGISTRATION

Thank you for registering for “The NAIA 2009 Stimulus Plan: Project ART!

Director’s Conference fee includes lunch on Thursday and Friday and admission to the Peoria Art Guild’s Famous Patron Preview Event.

We are happy to offer secure, encrypted on-line registration with your Visa or MasterCard (only.)

To take advantage of the incredibly low rate of $75, you must register before July 23. (Mailed registrations must be postmarked by July 20th.)

After July 22nd registration rates will be:

NAIA Contributing Members:
1st Person: $130.00 (50% Cancellation fee)
2nd Person from the same organization: $120.00 (50% Cancellation fee)
Subsequent person from same organization: $110.00 (50% Cancellation fee)
NAIA Contributing Membership, New or Renewal Fee: $95.00

Non-Members:
1st Person: $230.00 (50% Cancellation fee)
2nd Person from the same organization: $220.00 (50% Cancellation fee)
Subsequent person from same organization: $210.00 (50% Cancellation fee)
NAIA Contributing Membership, New or Renewal Fee: $95.00

Like to join first? Go to the Membership page.

If you need to pay the registration fee by check, choose the last selection in the drop-down menu below to pay $00 online. Then mail your $75 check made out to “NAIA” to:
NAIA 2009 Conference
3155 Buck Island Rd.
Charlottesville, VA 22902

2009 NAIA Director Conference Registration
(Note: Unless you specifically know that your NAIA Membership is up to date, it has probably expired and you will need to renew to receive the Member rate.)
(EARLY Registration Options available though July 22nd only)

After this form is completed and “submitted” a new “Shopping Cart” window will open. Be sure to check the charges listed, then hit the “Recalculate” button. After verifying all is correct, hit the “Go to Payments” button to finish check out.

Companion names if applicable: 
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NoIf “yes” and you were encouraged to register by another attendee, please list the name of the show and director that encouraged you to attend

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(We will offer a vegetarian selection. We will also do our best to accommodate other food preferences but cannot fully guarantee complete accommodation.)
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Please list any questions or issues that you may want to bring up during the Open Agenda portion of the conference for discussion and feedback by those in attendance. Alternatively, if reasonable, we may try to incorporate your issues into the scheduled presentations.
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Artist Information Statement

The NAIA version of an Artist Information Statement was developed after having shows ask us for some idea of what would be helpful. We hoped that this would be a version that could be applicable to most shows that want to include a statement but would like it understood that the NAIA version is a suggestion. We ask shows to not see this version as gospel! Not all artists are members of NAIA – please don’t refer to your version as “The NAIA Artists Statement”.

The intent of the Artist Information Statement is positive and educational. In the words of one show director, “This is a philosophical tenet that we all should embrace as an opportunity to educate.” In addition, it helps curb misrepresentation when information is put in writing for the public and peers to read. A review of the example statements that follow illustrate how informative and complete the statements can be. The completion of one statement should satisfy the needs of all shows.

The objectives of the Artist Information Statement are to identify, inform, and educate. It should describe succinctly and clearly information about the artist’s work that might be important to consumers, judges, show committees, or other artists. As an educational tool and conversation starter, it should insure that the viewer understands what is being seen, who made it, and how it was produced.

The following criteria should be satisfied in all statements:

  • A photograph of the artist and contact information. The photograph may be a portrait but it is preferable to show the artist at work. It is important that the artist is identifiable. In the case of collaborative work, photo should include both artists.
  • Identification of medium and processes/techniques used. This should be simple – certainly not a disclosure of trade secrets or proprietary processes, i.e “painted wood” is probably enough rather than disclosing the special kind of paint you developed over the years and what kind of wood.
  • Specific explanation of how the work is produced.
  • If paid employees, assistants or apprentices are used, a concise and complete description of their involvement should be included. If you don’t use assistants or apprentices, state that none are used.
  • Where appropriate, identify materials and methods of handling those materials. Again, this should not entail disclosure of proprietary processes.
  • It should be stated if an outside source such as a foundry or printing lab is used.
  • Resume-type information such as awards, exhibitions, collections, etc. should NOT be included in this statement. Assuming that the show allows it, this type of information can be posted separately.
  • Any other educational information could be included, but the overall statements should not exceed one page.

An 8 1/2″ X 11″ format has been suggested for uniformity in handling and ease of reproduction. Some shows have indicated a future desire to have the statement accompany their application. It has also been suggested that the content fall within an 8″ X 10″ space on the page if you would like to use a standard frame size for posting in your booth.

ORLANDO AGENDA

November, 1995
Orlando, Florida
By Banister Pope

Everybody,
I’ve got an agenda for our Friday night meeting in Orlando. I’m certainly not looking to be the chief, but I used to run a pretty tight meeting in a previous life. If it’s OK with you, I’ll lead us through this, so we can leave prepared for Saturday’s membership meeting. Let’s agree to take care of business first and save any digression for later. Please read over this so you’ll kind of know what your thinking is on each topic and what jobs you’re willing to do.

Agenda
We’ve said what it is that we intend to do and we’re asking our peers to accept our provisional leadership. The immediate next step is to agree among ourselves who’ll accept responsibility for what. So here we go:

Expanding our membership is primary.
There are several ways to tackle this at once.

  1. Contact everyone who has volunteered for anything and ask that they shepard the enrollment of a half a dozen artists. This means contacting them, explaining what we’re up to and staying after them until they’ve returned a survey.
  2. Ask Greg Lawler to include one more round of the survey in his mailing. Also Larry Harris.
  3. Ask Sunshine Artists to publish an announcement of our formation with an address for inquiries.
  4. Include the survey in our initial newsletter.

We must get a credible newsletter out soon.
New years seems to be a good target date. To do this will require:

  1. Immediate employment of volunteers to assemble and submit information.
  2. Gathering information submitted and deciding what to include.
  3. Working with Bo Sterk (who has agreed to design the format) to make it all fit.
  4. Getting it printed, assembled and mailed.

This will be time-consuming, but there are lots of volunteers and certainly no shortage of ideas on what to include. So who’ll do it?
Who’ll begin as editor?

Also the Web site. Can we ask Michael Hamilton and Bruce Teschner to do this? They may already have it in place.

Next, we have to decide who’ll assemble teams and lead the effort in each of the areas we intend to address. We’ll all have to help each other, of course, but when we meet tonight, one person has to stand up and say “I’ll be working on this.”

Teams

1. Promoting the improvement of existing shows and developing new markets.

This is directly tied to our functioning as a source for show directors. In order to develop a perception of our organization as a desirable (and, in time, an indispensible) asset, we’ve really got to have a hell of a helpful package to offer them. Here’s what I see are necessary components of that package:

  1. A “National Standards” guideline to encompass what information should be included in every prospectus, postmark rather than date of receipt, space allotments, security concerns, jurying procedures, judging guidelines, standard catagories, slide requirements, etc.
  2. A list of artists in show area willing to serve on “advisory boards.” (Artists recommended for advisory boards will need to have a grasp of all the information we have to offer.)
  3. A list of recommendeed jurors/judges.
  4. A report on hte educational impact shows have on communities.
  5. Suggestions and “how-to” information for children’s activities.
  6. List of our membership for mailings.
  7. An overwhelmingly rosy synopsis of our member artists achievements that can be used for publicity purposes.
  8. Highlights of, and a way to access, the “Charney Plan.”
  9. For new shows, an overview of pertinent demographics that underscore the potential of that community. This package should be assembled and ready to present prior to our contacting shows. Again, we can all contribute to the development of this and we can all call on volunteers, but someone has to coordinate all this.

Who will it be among us?
This part could be fun. Armed with evidence of our collective purchasing power (i.e. 200 artists use 300,000 gallons of gas, rent 10,000 hotel rooms each year, eat 30,000 meals, buy a million dollars worth of materials every year, imagine what 1,000 artists do and consider that there may be 5,000 of us out there!). We’re certainly not out of line in persuing some perks. This involves figuring out (though understanding costs and pricing dictates) what is reasonable to ask, finding out who to ask, getting to that person and asking. The people who do this might look at it as a great big scavenger hunt! Okay, this needs a coordinator.
Who’ll do it?

3. Secure “pro-bono” legal counsel by region.
This one is easy. I’m sure everyone of us could find among our patrons a lawyer or two who would be willing to provide counsel (not representation) to artists. They could advise us, as needed, and maybe write a letter to a “bad check” for individual artists and cleverly write off their own costs. Someone needs to identify and contact these lawyers.
Who’ll do it?

4. Establish an annual convention. Explore health care options/ “artist welfare” programs.
These are really long-term considerations. They take some smart research and time.
Who’ll develop our thinking in this direction?

5. Provide support for emerging artists.
This is something we should all, and by all I mean the collective membership, do. It’s easy. A brief bit in the newsletter could establish the mechanism for doing this. Works like this:
Somebody calls me, or you, and says, “Hey, I saw a new artist. A photographer. Here’s their name and address.” So I call Ray and Rick and ask them to write an encouraging note expressing their willingness to share information. It’s easy and helps the industry.
Who’ll do it?

6. Next, we have to have some (smarter) one among us develop a financial plan for the association.
Frankly, I don’t know what considerations apply here. I suppose: 1. Figuring out what we need, 2. figuring out how to get it, and 3. keeping track of it (being the treasurer).
Who’ll do it?

Initially, I thought we’d have to have a “front man/woman” to be the designated liaison between the association and everyone else. I don’t think so anymore. Now I think that if we’re all available it will be easier for everyone. As a steering committee, we should all be up on what’s happening and be able to refer any question to the one of us dealing with that specific area. Between us, we either know or are known to a great many artists and we can avoid any reluctance that an interested person may have in contacting a total stranger. The more of us that are listed as contacts, the more accessible we are. (We’ll include names and our addresses in the newsletter.)

Someone has to get the mail. Can we keep the Alpharetta POB? Will Rick and Lenny redistribute as necessary?

So that we’re all kept abreast, can we send seven copies of whatever matters out? Is there a better way? What is it? Okay, so what will the mechanism be?

2005 Artist Conference Registration

Thank you for registering for the 2005 NAIA Artist Conference!

All registration fees include special Sunday evening dinner, and catered breakfasts and lunches on Monday and Tuesday, and seminar materials.

We are happy to offer secure, encrypted on-line registration with your Visa or MasterCard (only.)

If you would prefer to print out a registration form and mail in, click on the link to the PDF file to your left.

2005 NAIA Artist Conference Registration – CHOOSE JUST ONE
 Member – $160
 Member with companion – $160 + $80 = $240
Companion: 
 Non-member – $215
 Non-member with companion – $215 + $135 = $350
Companion: 
Optional: Digital Workshops – CHOOSE JUST ONE  (click for details)
 Image Editing 101 with Larry Berman & Randy Smith – Monday evening – $50
 Practical Application of Image Editing Programs with Larry Berman and Randy Smith – Monday afternoon – $50
 Practical Application of Image Editing Programs with Larry Berman and Randy Smith – Tuesday afternoon – $50
Special workshop discounts

Sign up for 2 of the above workshops and receive a $5.00 discount on the second one. Sign up for all three of the above workshops, and receive a $10.00 discount on the third. Be sure not to duplicate your choices!

   Second workshop for $45!
Select your workshop:
 Image Editing 101 Monday evening
 Image Editing Programs Monday evening
 Image Editing Programs Tuesday afternoon
   Third workshop for $40!
Select your workshop:
 Image Editing 101 Monday evening
 Image Editing Programs Monday evening
 Image Editing Programs Tuesday afternoon
Optional: Digital Workshops  (details)
 An Artist’s Guide to the Future – Using Technology as a Creative Tool with Chris Maher – Monday afternoon – $25
Silent Auction
I would like to bring a piece of artwork for the Silent Auction. (If you check this box, we will contact you with further information and instructions.)
 Yes
 No
   

FRAME SUPPLIERS

I made the decision to not do business with Larson-Juhl about ten years ago when I was looking for good hardwood frames. I had been told of a company called Clark, I believe, that had beautiful hardwood frames, of which I was shown a few samples. Turned out they had just been bought by Larson-Juhl, who had been buying up small moulding and supply companies as fast as they could. The new samples from Larson-Juhl were not what I was looking for. In the process of opening an account with Larson Juhl, I met with so much resistance, suspicion, general bs, and hassle that I wrote them off as one of those companies that I wouldn’t do business with under any circumstances. I recall some phone conversations that made it hard to believe that they were in business to serve their customers. My suggestion is to look for other companies that would be delighted to have your business. I’ll be happy to offer you any help I can to find a frame and material supplier to take their place, and you will probably find better prices as well. The large frame and supply trade shows, like Frame-o-Rama in NY, are great resources. There are plenty of good suppliers out there.
Michael Kopald


I quit using Larson-Juhl a few years ago, as I found them not to be artist friendly. Instead I use Metropolitan Picture Framing for all of my frames and some of my supplies. MPF is located here in Minneapolis and manufacture beautiful, classic architectural hardwood frames used by museums, galleries, artists and photographers. They are involved in all aspects of custom framing from presentation design to crating and shipping. They even custom designed a profile of moulding for my panel pieces. You will find them very responsive to the individual needs of artists. Check out their wonderful website at: www.metroframe.com/. You can even order online. Or call them at 1-800- 626-3139 For some of my other hardware and supplies (screws, wire, hangers, and etc., I use United Manufacturers Supplies Inc. 1-800-645-7260.
Ginny Herzog


I too, have had the same problem trying to activate an account with Larson- Juhl. When we stopped selling our photographs in the hand painted frames, we had looked around and picked a frame style from Larson-Juhl. Of course they refused to sell to me. So I found a local, family run, frame shop and they were more then happy to order, chop and join the frames I wanted at a reasonable price. On another note. For the picture sizes I most use, I’m having my mats cut by Dixie Matting (800-245-8064) and they are reliable and inexpensive. I figured out that for a little over the cost of me purchasing the mat board, I can have the mats delivered already cut, and better spend my time elsewhere.

Living in Pittsburgh, I also use Lewinter (800-633-8886). They have competitive pricing and I can pick up and save shipping costs, especially on matboard.

Here’s another framing supply resource. I also use UMS, but I find that sometimes it’s worth paying a little more and order supplies from M&M Distributers (800-526-2302I would recommend Lexington Framing Supplies to anyone in or near Kentucky. They are a wholesale only business, and have been really responsive to my needs. Fairly huge selection of frames, too. They will ship anywhere. If interested, talk to Jim Robinson, 859-254-3353.
Larry Berman


We are very happy with Art Express out of Grand Rapids who deliver FREE to our door. They have a wide range of framing supplies. Not sure how wide their delivery range is, but we are several hours away from Grand Rapids. They can be reached at 1-800-542-7188.
Connie Darwish


Try Nurre Caxton at phone no. (800) 255-1942. I’ve been doing business with them for years. I order thumbnailed chops but you can get frames assembled also. They’re easy to deal with and have good molding. Any company as stupid as Larson-Juhl does not deserve your business.
Kathleen Eaton


On this subject, I received a catalog yesterday from a local supplier that advertises to do-it-yourselfers and ships nationwide. Check out www.documounts.com to see if the selection and pricing is competitive. I have ordered from them a few times with good results, however, generally don’t frame my paintings as most are painted around the edge.
Stephanie

PHOTOGRAPHY, ART SHOWS, AND THE DIGITAL REALM

Oct, 2001

Eddie Soloway
Don Ament

NAIA National Category Advisors, Photography

The rapid development of digital imaging technologies in the last decade has thrown an enormous and intriguing ball of excitement into the photographic community. However, along with the excitement has come many questions about the creative and technical possibilities of these new tools. This report attempts to address some of these questions and shed light on some of the confusion. Both authors are actively involved in the digital imaging community, and have over five decades of combined experience in traditional photography (are we really getting that old?)

The report is divided into two sections:

  1. Technical Basics on digital photography and digital output
  2. Specific Issues for Art Fairs

TECHNICAL BASICS

The word digital as it pertains to photography encompasses a wide spectrum of tools and tasks. Digital cameras can be used in place of film-based cameras to create images. While currently somewhat expensive on the high-end side, their ability to capture a wider spectrum of light values does and will continue to allow the artist to capture more of what the eye sees than does film. Film only captures a relatively narrow spectrum of light values. It should be noted that the cost of digital cameras continues to drop, and the quality continues to rise. It has become increasingly “economically realistic” to create very high quality photographic images without using film at all.

Once a film or digital image is captured with the camera, it can then enter another digital realm, often referred to as the digital darkroom. Taking the place of the chemical darkroom, the image is transferred into a computer. From film this would be accomplished by scanning the image and recording it onto a CD, DVD, hard drive, or various other data storage media, then opening the image file in the computer. From a digital camera you could also transfer the image to similar storage media or directly into an image editing program in the computer.

Once in a computer, the image is adjusted in similar ways that it would be in a wet darkroom. Careful printers, either traditional or digital, spend enormous amounts of time and effort meticulously creating the right color balance, determining contrast, maintaining highlight and shadow detail, etc; in other words nudging the final print in the direction they originally envisioned.

It must be stressed that master printers working in either a wet darkroom or a digital darkroom are concerned with exactly the same issues. The software programs created for digital darkroom work are geared towards artists with a solid and deep understanding of traditional darkroom printing. One advantage to digital darkroom work is that you can work at a very meticulous level without the constraints of a traditional darkroom determining when you are finished, or what you can accomplish. For example, the artist can try many different ways to open the shadow areas in an image, select one, study it against other choices, and finish it to be just as desired. Much greater creative control is possible in the digital darkroom.

Once an image is worked to the artist’s satisfaction on the computer, it can be output in many different ways. One option is to have the digital file output to traditional photographic film, then go back into the wet darkroom and print from the film containing all the careful digital manipulations that were made.

However, much more common among photographers working in the digital realm is the use of high-end “direct digital” printing processes. With one of these processes, the finished digital “negative” is transferred to a machine that burns laser light onto traditional photographic paper which in turn is developed in standard chemistry. The papers in this process are a new generation of very fade resistant photographic papers. These prints are often referred to as LightJet or Lambda prints, which simply refers to the name of the manufacturer of the printing machine.

In a second “direct” process the digital image file can be transferred to a giclee (pronounced “zhee-clay”) inkjet machine that sprays extremely fine drops of ink onto various types of high quality paper. There are several manufacturers of giclee printers, and each uses different technology to create the print, adding additional creative choices for the photographer seeking true photographic output. The term “giclee” has caused some confusion, but it is simply another term for a very high quality inkjet print. It is not a trademarked name.

Early generation giclee prints suffered badly from quick fading, but there are now many ink and paper combinations that offer extraordinary fade resistance, with some types lasting to 100 years and longer (based on accelerated aging tests performed by Wilhelm Imaging Research). Also, early generations of the printers had poor resolution, producing prints with a noticeable “dot pattern” from the drops of ink. The newest generation of printers have eliminated this problem, producing drops of ink so small that they are virtually impossible to detect even with a 20X magnifying loupe. In short, when properly printed, they are indistinguishable from traditional color photographic prints. It is also important to note that with the vast assortment of digital fine art paper and ink combinations, the digital photographer now has a greatly expanded choice in the subtle printing characteristics of various combinations of the new media.

The cost of high quality giclee printers continues to drop, and has reached a point where many photographers are purchasing their own printers, even large format printers, and doing all printing in house. Thus, from initial image capture to the finished photographic print, a photographer working with digital tools can have complete creative control over the artistic expression desired. It should also be noted that digital printing, like traditional photographic printing, requires great care and craftsmanship on the part of the person doing the printing. The digital workflow introduces its own unique set of challenges for the artist, and many technical and aesthetic decisions must be made in order to produce a photographic print that is true to the original vision of the photographer.

SPECIFIC ISSUES FOR ART FAIRS

We will attempt to address some concerns and questions that have popped up in the art fair community.

  1. If it has a digital component, it is not photography.
    The Art Fair community is the only place where this idea has surfaced. The mainstream gallery, museum, and fine art photography communities have accepted and embraced digital technology as simply another tool in the arsenal of the photographer. We asked a colleague working for a digital photographic lab what clients he had of national recognition. He mentioned The Whitney Museum, The Museum of Fine Art in Boston, The Ansel Adams Trust, Irving Penn, Pete Turner, David Muench, to name a few. At The Santa Fe Photographic Workshops the list of national and international photographers that use and teach digital printing is larger than those that do not. All of these photographers and institutions consider their work “photography”, they are simply in pursuit of the highest print quality possible.

    Ideas suggesting that once an image has been in a computer it is no longer a photograph, but is now “digital art”, overlook two key facts. First, most photographers working digitally today are not concerned with manipulating an image to the extent of moving trees or altering colors and so on. They are simply in search of a finer photographic print, with often obsessive commitment to the integrity of how the image was originally shot. Secondly, the concern about big scale “manipulations” overlooks the history of photography. Since its inception, some photographic artists have made images by compositing many images and/or components together. Photography has always had an experimental side. The computer, like the traditional darkroom, is simply another creative tool for the dedicated artist.

  2. Digital prints are reproductions.
    For the first time, we are dealing with printing devices and technology that are capable of producing both reproductions and original prints from the exact same printing device. Confusing? You bet! Painters and other two dimensional artists are able to have their work scanned and REPRODUCED by a skilled technician using a giclee printer. At the same time, photographers are able to output their images on the same machines to produce an ORIGINAL photograph. (Some photographers refer to their work as Multiple Originals, whether digital or traditional, to help distinguish photography from one-of-a-kind original work, such as a painting.)

    How can an art show deal with the confusing definitions? One key difference of course is the fact that a painting already exists, and the artist is simply handing it over to a printing house with the instructions to reproduce the original as closely as possible. Duplication is the goal, with no creative interpretation. With the digital photograph, however, the final print IS considered the (multiple) original. All creative interpretations and adjustments have been made in the computer, by the photographic artist, and the final result is the finished, printed, photograph. The creativity expressed through the computer is inherent in the final piece. This is no different from traditional, chemical based darkroom printing, only a different tool is used. In this regard then, digital photography is not unlike the Digital Art category, as both are capable of producing (multiple) original prints via giclee or LightJet printers (described above).

  3. If it has a digital component, the artist should enter in the Digital Art category.
    With widespread and respected international acceptance, digital tools have already become a part of photography. We would suggest that use of digital tools by photographers at Art Fairs should not require any special treatment by shows much in the same way that alternative and historic photographic processes do not. The suggestion here would be full disclosure of printing methods in an Artist Statement. We would also suggest that the statement “photographs must be printed from the artist’s original negative”, found on many applications, needs updating, as it will become more and more likely that a traditional original “negative” does not even exist, as some photographers will certainly migrate to the use of digital cameras.
  4. Digital photographic prints are easy to make, just push a few buttons.
    To this, we would only ask, have you ever had ANYTHING work on a computer that was as “seamless” and “productive” as the advertising claimed? Artists who are exploring the digital frontier are encountering enormous technical and creative challenges. The authors can personally attest to this! It is a never ending quest to keep up with, understand, and properly implement the technology. Of course, it is certainly possible to push a few buttons and get an “image” out of a computer. Just as it is possible to push a button on a camera, put a brush to canvas, throw a hunk of clay on a wheel, and get “something”. The reality of digital photography, much like anything else, is far more complex than what meets the eye. Much attention is currently being paid to the craftsmanship involved in the making of high end digitally printed photographs. Again, we wish to emphasize the vast difference between the artist striving for the highest standards, versus the hobbyist.
  5. Digital photographic prints are inexpensive to make, and are of “cheap” quality.
    We hope to have debunked this myth in the Technical Basics area of this report because actually the exact opposite is true for photographers making high-end digital prints. The excellent quality of these prints can only be obtained with expensive scans, followed by extremely detailed digital darkroom work requiring a high-end monitor and a computer with enormous amounts of memory to hold and work with the large files from the scans. This is followed by output onto a very sophisticated printer. Also, the raw material costs are much higher than traditional color photographic materials. Having said all that, we must state that of course it is also possible to take a digital file down to the copy shop and have them run off a stack of laser copies. The quality of digital photography, like all art, runs the gamut.

CONCLUSION

We like humorist Dave Barry’s take on computer technology. Dave advocates that computer stores should place large trash dumpsters near their checkout lines, so that you can conveniently throw away the obsolete computer you just bought. The same thinking could easily apply to the rapidly evolving area of digital photography! Still, the digital technology of today is capable of producing photographic prints of extraordinary quality, and the photographer is presented with an entirely new realm of creative choices and challenges. The digital technology of tomorrow will bring even higher quality, and more choices for the artist.

Certainly, not every photographer is going digital, nor should they. Although this paper may sound as if we are extolling the “glorious perfection” of digital photography, what we are really hoping to accomplish is to simply present the idea that digital photography is here, and is being used by an increasing number of photographers. We have tried to supply some basic technical information, but realize that this report may raise questions regarding processes, techniques, etc. We invite your questions and comments.

Sincerely,

Don Ament
859.252.8368
www.donament.com

Eddie Soloway
505.466.6030
www.anaturaleye.com

Memorial to Patrick Turner

There will be an art show for Patrick Turner The Urban Contemporary
Renaissance Man in Milwaukee Wisconsin Displaying many of his originals and collector pieces for sale.

Location: The Marshall Building
316 N. Milwaukee Street
Milwaukee WI, 53202

Date:
Opening Reception
Friday August 21, 2009
5:30 to 9:00 p.m
Live Music & Hors d’oeuvers

Sat. August 22, 2009
10:30 to 11:00 a.m Continental Breakfast
11:00 a.m Investing in Art Panel Discussion
Featuring artist and investors from the community

Closing reception 1:00 to 4:00 p.m
Libations, Music, recognitions, Shared memories and gathering of artist and
Family and Friends

Your Truly
Hostess
Manisha Dotson


My last conversation with him was at the Madison art show and he was getting ready to retire from the gas company in Milwaukee, move to Texas and start fulltime doing shows.
He was a creative, kind soul with a great sense of humor who will be dearly missed.

He was accepted in many of the top shows and won numerous awards.

I was saddened that we will no longer see his smiling face.

– Elaine Lanoue
p.s. I appreciate Powderhorn has a memorial page in his honor and I wanted to share it with you.
PowderhornArtFair.org

A slide show tribute to Patrick can be viewed at the Art Guild in Milwaukee website:

Another Star has fallen on December 17, 2008 in Milwaukee, WI. But this is a Star that shown brighter than most. An artist with so much creativity and value on life, Patrick freely helped others find their own value and creativity until you would feel abundantly rich with it and it had to flow. Thank you Patrick for showing me how to express and create what was already in me. A true therapist, Patrick Turner! He will be greatly missed. But we will Celebrate your life.
TheeArtGuild.com/


Patrick Turner and I were great friends for 35 years we met at We energies where we worked in the Leak survey Dept. as survey Tech. II, I am very sadden at the lost of my friend.
– Manisha Dotson

2005 ARTIST CONFERENCE ACCOMODATIONS

Maumee Bay Lodge & Conference Center (www.maumeebayresort.com)
Double occupancy – $155/night. Reservations are limited and must be made by calling Maumee Bay directly at 1-800-282-7275 (press 1 for rooms). Ask for a room under the NAIA block. This room block is held only until June 9, 2005. Make your reservations early!

Maumee Bay Camp Sites (www.dnr.state.oh.us/parks/parks/maumeebay.htm)
Deluxe camping is available a stroll away from the Conference Center. For those interested in the option of camping, please note that this is a popular vacation area, so reserve your space as soon as possible. To reserve a camping space, call 1-800-282-7275, ext. 7.
Other Lodging Option

Additional motel rooms, with a wide range of pricing, are also available 15 minutes away in Toledo. (All conference attendees, regardless of where they lodge, will be able to enjoy the facilities at Maumee Bay).

The following list was generated by Mapquest and is provided to assist you in making arrangements.

B & B Railroad Depot (2.84 miles)
5331 Cedar Point Rd, Oregon, OH
419-690-7137
Econo Lodge (4.06 miles
10530 Corduroy Rd, Curtice, OH
419-836-2822
Heartland of Oregon (5.46 miles)
3953 Navarre Ave, Oregon, OH
419-698-4521
Holiday Inn Express Oregon (6.40 miles)
3139 Dustin Rd, Oregon, OH
419-691-8800
Seneca Motel (6.49 miles)
2935 Navarre Ave, Oregon, OH
419-691-0792
Comfort Inn (6.51 miles)
2930 Navarre Ave, Or, OH
419-691-8911
Sleep Inn (7.33 miles)
1761 Meijer Cir, Or, OH
419-697-7800
Express Motel (7.49 miles)
301 Bihl Ave, Northwood, OH
419-693-9331
Classic Inn (7.53 miles)
1821 E Manhattan Blvd, Toledo, OH
419-729-1945
Express Motel (7.57 miles)
Ih 280 & Woodville Rd, Toledo, OH
419-693-9331
Hampton Inn (7.81 miles)
5865 Hagman Rd, Toledo, OH
419-727-8725
Reflections At Wyndham Hotel
Two Seagate (Summit St.), Toledo, OH
419-241-1411
Ramada Inn (8.98 miles)
141 N Summit St, Toledo, OH
419-242-8885
Radisson Hotel (9.02 miles)
101 N Summit St, Toledo, OH
419-241-3000
Comfort Inn (9.26 miles)
445 E Alexis Rd, Toledo, OH
419-476-0170
Lorraine Motor Hotel (9.27 miles)
1117 Jefferson Ave, Toledo, OH
419-243-6126
Super 8 Motel (9.52 miles)
4163 Super 8 Dr, Luna Pier, MI
734-848-8880
Sunset Motel (9.54 miles)
5452 Telegraph Rd, Toledo, OH
419-476-7777

“THE NAIA 2009 STIMULUS PLAN: PROJECT ART!” ONLINE ** ARTIST** REGISTRATION

Thank you for registering for “The NAIA 2009 Stimulus Plan: Project ART!

Conference fee includes lunch on Thursday.

We are happy to offer secure, encrypted on-line registration with your Visa or MasterCard (only.)

The Artist fee for Thursday, September 24 is only $25, to cover food. Please register here so we know how large a room to reserve and how much food to plan.

To join NAIA go to the Membership page.

If you need to pay the registration fee by check, choose the last selection in the drop-down menu below to pay $00 online. Then mail your $25 check made out to “NAIA” to:
NAIA 2009 Conference
3155 Buck Island Rd.
Charlottesville, VA 22902

2009 NAIA Director/Artist Summit Conference Registration

Additional information
First time conference attendee?
Yes
NoIf “yes” and you were encouraged to register by another attendee, please list the name of the artist or show director that encouraged you to attend

Food Preferences (check one)
(We will offer a vegetarian selection. We will also do our best to accommodate other food preferences but cannot fully guarantee complete accommodation.)
Not picky
Vegetarian
Other   
 

“I’ve Got a Question”
Please list any questions or issues that you may want to bring up during the Open Agenda portion of the conference for discussion and feedback by those in attendance. Alternatively, if reasonable, we may try to incorporate your issues into the scheduled presentations.
1.  
2.  
3.  

   
After you submit your registration, please email a copy of your show’s logo to  so that we can include it on your conference nametag and table card. Thank you.

Memorial to Bill Coombs

Dear Members,

I received a phone call from Bill Coombs daughter this morning. Bill passed away very early this morning with LaTrece, and their daughter and new son-in-law by his side.

Bill was to be in the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival this weekend. Please join us in spirit as a flower is placed in remembrance of Bill at his booth space on Sunday.

Peace be with you, Bill.

Ardath


Dear NAIA Members,

I just wanted to say ?Thank You? for all the kind words which you sent to us during Bill?s illness and those very caring words of sympathy that you sent to me after his death on March 18, 2006. Words cannot express how much those thoughts and sentiments about him and about his work meant during this very awful time.
The last show we did was Reston in May 2005 – He continued to work some during his illness and also finished a large commissioned painting at the beginning of this year; there was still one left to do. The desire to create was great. We cut a hole to his studio and ran his oxygen to his painting area so that he could continue to work as long as possible.
He participated fully with the help of a wheelchair, oxygen and many varieties of pain medications in his daughters? wedding on February 25, 2006. It was a glorious occasion and one that I will never forget. He stood and danced with Victoria a few steps to his chosen song for this special moment – Louis Armstrong?s ? What A Wonderful World?.
It has been a very, very tough 11 months for me – during his illness and especially now after his death. We were married for 37+ years and as you know we also worked together – Bill as the artist and me doing the ?other than creative? stuff. He spent not one day in the hospital during his illness. We worked very hard trying to find a treatment that would work; but nothing did, so we worked very hard at our ?goodbyes? – but there is still a big hole in me that I can?t fill or mend – I think it is in my heart.
I have sold his work since 1979 and I will attempt to carry this on in some modified fashion. I have had most of the remaining works shot for reproductions. I hope to remain connected to you all in some respect – at least I will go to shows as a patron/viewer. I will be selling show stuff down the line, perhaps the van and/or our trailer, the etching press, etc. but right now I just have to find some peace somewhere, somehow. I am only managing to put one foot in front of the other right now.

Again, thanks and I will never forget doing shows and building some very strong relationships with many of you.

Happy Trails –

LaTrece


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

Memorial to John Wrenn

From Sylvia Brongo:

November 14, 1949 – February 28, 2011
John Wrenn, died on Monday, Feb. 28, 2011, at St. Mary?s Hospital in Madison, following an accident. He was born on November 14, 1949, in Millville, NJ. He attended school in Atlanta, GA and in Des Plaines, IL. He attended U.W. Stevens Point and remained a resident of Wisconsin for the rest of his life. John worked for CAP Services in Stevens Point and for Wisconsin Power and Light (Alliant Energy) before he decided to use his artistic abilities to create Raku pottery. His magnificent work was sold at art fairs and in galleries all over the country. He retired from his craft in November of 2010.
John loved art, music, and movies. He enjoyed watching all sports, especially football and boxing. He enjoyed golfing and traveling. John will be most remembered for his amazing sense of humor.
John is survived by Samuel Urquhart, his dear grandson; Laurie Wrenn and Laurie Strommen also survive him. Other survivors include his stepchildren: Scot Urquhart, Kevin Urquhart, and Erin Urquhart; his grandson, Russell Urquhart; and his siblings: Eileen Moroney, Mike (Linda) Wrenn, and Donna Wrenn. John also leaves behind numerous in-laws, nieces, nephews, and many close friends. He was preceded in death his parents, Jack and Eleanor Wrenn; his brothers, Larry Wrenn and Phil Wrenn; and by his beloved daughter, Jamie Wrenn.
A Memorial Mass will be held at 3 p.m. at ST. WILLIAM?S CATHOLIC CHURCH, 456 N. Arch St., Janesville, on Sunday, March 13, 2011, with Celebrant, Fr. John Aubry. Friends and relatives may greet the family from 1 until 3 p.m. at the CHURCH until the time of Mass. Mass will be followed by a celebration of John?s life to be held at the Janesville Town Hall, 1628 N. Little Road, Janesville. The SHRINER-HAGER-GOHLKE FUNERAL HOME, MONROE, WI, is serving the family.
In lieu of other expressions of sympathy, the family requests that any donations be made to an education fund for Samuel Urquhart. Checks can be made to Samuel Urquhart fund, c/o D. Wrenn, 1137 Yuba St., Janesville, WI 53545.
Oh Heart, if one should say to you that the soul perishes like the body, answer that the flower withers, but the seed remains. -?Kahlil Gibran

Memorial to Drew Smith

From the February 2009 issue of CERF News:

Master Glassblower Drew Smith passed away of liver cancer last December 21 at his home in Pacific Beach, CA.

Drew was well-known in the American crafts field. From 1971 – 2002 he was a regular exhibitor at the American Craft Council shows, the Buyers Market of American Crafts, and the Ohio Designer Craftsmen shows, among many others. He was highly regarded for his creative work in handblown glass from studios near Columbus, OH and in Tampa, Jamaica, and Pacific Beach.

In 1999, Drew was featured in Glass Art magazine as one of the four leading glass furniture makers in the world. His glass and sculptural works have been exhibited at shows and galleries thrughout the U.S., Europe, and Japan, with permanent collections in various art museums including the Corning Museum and the Smithsonian Institution.

“Great ideas bubbled up out of Drew like fresh water from a spring”, recalled Curtis Benzle, professor emeritus at Columbus College of Art and Design, where Drew also taught.

Friends and family have asked that donations be made to CERF in Drew’s name.


I first met Drew and Kirsi at ACC Baltimore and then would always seek him out at the BMAC shows while I was wholesaling. His humor was irrepressable and unique. I will never forget the last time I saw him when they were getting ready to move to Tampa. It was right when the technology started spreading for making glow in the dark glass. Drew had gloated over the controversy that surrounded a Niche magazine cover that featured some of his metal and glass people with anatomical details. He poked great fun at the repressed Americans who objected to the picture.

In true form, during that last show together, he had a secret compartment under his display so you could observe, out of the lights, his newest semi-functional anatomically correct sculpture that glowed in the dark. The whole hall knew he was up to something with everyone sneaking peaks at his creations. I believe he had a blockbuster show that year, but mostly he just gave as much as he got because everyone who was priviledged to see his secret product came away smiling. I’ll never forget that.

– Holly Olinger


From Drew’s friend Jan Mayer:

Master Glassblower Drew Smith passed away of inoperable liver cancer on 12/21/08 in his home in Pacific Beach, near San Diego, California. His very loving and caring finance?, Linda Livingston was right by his side throughout the entire passage.

Smith graduated with his B.A. from Ashland University in Ohio. He learned glass making from Henry Halem at Kent State University where he was a graduate assistant. He taught glassblowing at Columbus College of Art and Design from 1981 to 1986.

Drew was as very well known figure in the American Crafts field from 1971 to 2002 where he was a regular exhibitor at the American Craft Council shows, The Buyers Market of American Crafts, and The Ohio Designer Craftsmen shows, among many others.

Drew Smith was one of the leading glass blowers to come out of Ohio, and was highly regarded throughout the world for his creative genius with the medium of hand blown glass. His studio was based in the Hocking Hills- Logan, area, just outside of Columbus, Ohio for many years before moving it to Tampa, Florida. Drew received a lot of recognition in the Tampa community for upgrading his neighborhood with truly a magnificent art gallery and studio. From there he went to Jamaica, and then to Pacific Beach, San Diego.

In Drew?s early career, he specialized in lamps, vases, and tablewear. Later on, he moved to larger scale work in sculpture, metal and glass furniture and ornamental iron and glass gates. In 1999 he was featured in an issue of Glass Art magazine as one of the four leading glass furniture makers in the world. Smith cast glass into metal pieces like doing large cloisonne?. Smith called his technique ?Ferro Vitro.?

Drew?s hand blown glass and sculptural works have been exhibited at numerous shows and galleries throughout the U.S. , Europe, and Japan, with permanent collections in various art museums including the Corning Museum and the Smithsonian Institution.

Daniel Schreiber, a glass artist who studied with Drew said: ?Drew taught me almost everything I know about working professionally as a glass artist, and operating a glass studio. Apprenticing to him in his studio in Logan, Ohio, was the richest and most rewarding period in my artistic development and I will always fondly remember not only the art, the glass, but the food and drink, the stories and experiences, and most of all his friendship, and generosity and always his very positive attitude about his life, despite its challenges.?

Candiss Ann Cole, noted fiber artist, said: ?Drew was one of the first craftspeople to take me under his wing and guide me into this world we live in over 33 years ago. Drew and I met at the Frederick Craft Show in Maryland. He always had a Big smile and was always willing to share, and always moved to his own drummer. I guess The Drummer finally called him to the big Glass Studio in the sky! Drew?s magnificent art work will live in the lives of his customers, but he will live in our hearts forever.

Chuck Feil, professional photographer, author of 11 books, and co- owner of Panterra Gallery along with his partner, Maralyce Ferree, was one of Drew?s best pals for over 25 years said the following motto sums Drew up best: ?Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, wine in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming WOO HOO what a ride.?

Chuck asks that if you have photos of Drew?please email low resolution jpg. Images to: [email protected]
He has created a flickr.com album and will add them to it. You can currently view the album at http://flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157611912867287/
Please add captions so that we know who, what, where, and when they were taken.

Curtis Benzle, Professor Emeritus of Columbus College of Art and Design where Drew also taught, said ? Great ideas bubbled up out of Drew like fresh water from a spring. You could never quite know his source of inspiration but exciting new work just kept coming. Inspiration, ideas and always great execution were Drew?s trademarks. Drew knew as well as anyone that ideas without execution were just daydreams. Fortunately for us, Drew was also a master craftsman and he worked hard to fill our world with a lasting legacy of his artistic genius.?

Jan Mayer, of Kriska painting on silk, another long term close friend of Drew?s, fondly remembers Drew as ?one of the most loving, EXTREMELY COLORFUL, and giving members our artistic community has ever seen. If you ever needed a bed or a good meal or a helping hand, Drew never said no to anyone. Drew had a heart as big as the state of Texas. When the crafts business was booming, I used to organize outdoor recreational events for artists and gallery owners. These included white water rafting trips, ski trips to Utah and the French Alps, and houseboating trips on Lake Powell. Drew always volunteered to be my chef, pro bono! He loved to cook the finest creative meals possible with whatever he could dig up. He would often fly across the country with some of his ?hand picked wild mushrooms? or home raised chickens or turkeys. Appetizers would start around 5 p.m. and he would continue to feed us these utterly remarkable gourmet delights up until about 11p.m. For Drew, cooking and living were art forms just as much as glassblowing. One year during one of our artist ski trips to Alta, Utah, Drew presented every participant one of his hand blown glass goblets. I would have to say that all in all, Drew was as much of ? renaissance man? as I have ever personally known.?

Drew?s Mother, brother and daughter were all able to speak with him to say goodbye just minutes before his passing.

Drew was cremated wearing a black shirt with brightly colored parrots and flowers at the top, black pants, purple socks and yellow crocs, resting on bright neon green pillows.

Please log on and sign Drew?s guest book, and live a legacy for his family and many friends: http://www.legacy.com/Ohio/GB/GuestbookView.aspx?PersonId=121898201

Donations in honor of Drew may be made to Craft Emergency Relied Fund. CERF is the one and only non profit organization that assists craftspeople with interest free loans and grants when disaster or illness strikes. Your donations to CERF are a tax deductible, charitable contribution. Drew had the utmost respect for CERF, as it is truly a heart based, no nonsense organization that really does help craftspeople in time of need.

CERF(Craft Emergency Relief Fund)
P.O. Box 838
Montpelier, Vermont 05601

802.229.2306

Memorial to Bill Ruth

“We regret to inform everyone that yesterday, November 19th Bill Ruth died. He had been battling colon cancer for months, his resistance had been weakened, and he ultimately succumbed to pneumonia. Bill Ruth and Susan Mahlsted collaborated on their Jewelry. Anyone who knows them like them both. Bill had a truly unique and engaging sense of humor and will be missed.”


Name:
Date Posted: 02/09/07
Message:
Sue,
We are truly fortunate to have met Bill. He has a wonderful spirit that will continue to thrive. May God grant you comfort in your grief and know that you are both in our hearts and prayers.
Love,
Nancy and Mark

Name:
Date Posted: 01/02/07
Message:
The thought of Billy Ruth will forever make me giggle. I am so glad he was allowed to become human for even only a little while.
Willie

Name:
Date Posted: 12/30/06
Message:
To Susan –
I purchased two pair of your earrings at the ACC show in San Francisco. I don’t remember which years. I have always treasured those earrings and MANY people have complimented me on them. I especially remember one young man carrying a motorcycle helmet, dressed in black leather and blue jeans, who said he liked them “Cool!” and when I said they were made by a couple from Kansas City MO, he said – Hey! that is where I am from too! This was outside a Safeway store in Santa Rosa, CA

I remember Susan asking me if I wanted a copy of their bio, and we somehow got on the subject that Bill and Susan were married to each other, and that that was something people wanted to know about them. I remember thinking that what really mattered was what a good partnership it was for their art, or at least in the context of their jewelry.

I hope Susan has the heart to continue to work in metal. I think that would please Bill immensely. I am very sorry to hear that he had such a rough time. And I know that it was hard on Susan, too. I wish you peace in your heart and mind and hands.


Name:
Date Posted: 11/25/06
Message:
Together you took metal and made magic. A magic anyone who knew the both of you could easily see. Your laughter and kid-like grin will be missed. You’ll be in our thoughts and prayers.
Godspeed Bill.

Memorial to Carol Westlake

Dear Sally,
I wanted to return a message to you on Carol’s behalf, because of her passing away on Feb 20, 2008. Its not been easy for me with all of the things we both worked so hard at and shared in our life together; our art, buiseness, house, and so many other things that as a couple we had. Carol was out of commision for almost a year with liver cancer befor passing away in our home with a full moon and an eclipse for a send off. I hope this finds you well…..

Walter Vos


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

Memorial to Jan Dorer

At 4:30 today, April 6, 2010 my loving wife, Jan, peacefully passed on. She finally is at peace from the dastardly Alzheimer Disease. Bob, Cyndy, and I were by her side. Shelly (our wonderful caregiver), Hailey (her 8 year old angel of a daughter), and Beth (our warm hearted nurse from Hospice) were so kind and gentle as they guided us through this journey. Her passing was amazingly ethereal. Jan chose the time to pass as our dear friends Arlene Riba and Dave Busfield stopped by to check on her. Almost no one has such a supported parting.

We have had such a wonderful journey. What a rich life with Jan doing what she loved most in life. She was so creative and honest in her art. We get at least two or three emails a week from people saying how much Jan’s art has enriched their lives. What a reward to be so acknowledged.

I am so proud to have been able to care for her at home and keep her out of a nursing home. It was a struggle, but not difficult, for her twinkle remained throughout. Shelly got a kick out of Jan’s humor. She would tell me when Jan said, “get rid of that guy in the other room.”
We loved Jan and did our best and giggled with her.

A few years ago Jan and I decided to donate our bodies to the U. of Michigan Medical School. Hopefully her gift may help medical science in the future.

There will be a visitation at the Staffen Mitchell Funeral Home, 901 N,. Main St Chelsea, Mi. 48118 734 475 1444 on Sunday, April 11, 1:00 to 3:00. Jan did not like being singled out even for an award. The visitation will be a celebration of her life in keeping with her wishes.

Sincerely, Gil, Cyndy and Bob.

We are thankful that Dad let go of the reigns a little and “has allowed” us to share a few thoughts.
Dad does not want flowers or donations. If you need to do something, please, please, help keep our dad out of trouble (take him out for a beer, road trip to gizzard city, phone calls late at night, golf (only if you think 7 is par) ). Our Mom was such a special person. We are so proud of the impact that she has had on the art world.

Cyndy and Bob


Jan’s website is: DorerStudio.com


We were across the aisle in Ann Arbor for many years. We have missed Jan and Gil not being there. Occasionally we crossed paths at other shows.

We are so sorry to hear that Jan has moved to the higher plane.

Walt & Ruth Pinkus


Janice Elaine Bovay Dorer, 76, of Chelsea, Michigan peacefully passed away April 6, 2010. Janice was born December 13, 1933 in Saginaw, Michigan, and is preceded in death by her parents, Floyd and Mildred Bovay. She is survived by her husband of 54 years, Gil Dorer; her daughter Cynthia Dorer of Woodstock, Ga; her son Robert(Sally) Dorer of Minneapolis Mn; and two grandchildren, Ethan and Jenna; her brother in law, Gary,of Sedona, Arizona; many nieces and nephews; and a lifetime of wonderful friends.

It was during the loving embrace of her husband, Gil, and her two children, Cyndy and Bob that she passed from this earth. The moment will always be etched in their memory. Shelly, our wonderful caregiver, Hailey (her 8 year old angel of a daughter), and Beth (our warm hearted nurse from Hospice) were present as she passed from this world. The Hospice people were so kind and gentle as they guided us through this journey. Her passing was amazingly ethereal. Jan chose the time to pass as our dear friends Arlene Riba and Dave Busfield stopped by to check on her. Finally she is at peace and rid of that dastardly Alzheimer disease.

Jan was a special gifted person. She had a love for people, especially children. They would flock to her knowing her gentle kindness was there to warm them. Another gift was to her children, Cyndy and Bob. She was always there to the best of her ability and loved them unconditionally.

Jan was an artist. Not just an artist but one who was given the ability to touch people with her paintings. Hundreds of her paintings hang in homes throughout this country and others. It was her gift to the world. She was amazingly creative and able to speak to those with the ability to see the message. The message was always kind and gentle. Few are so rewarded to hear how much they have enriched the lives to those able the see her message through art. It is a personal gift to be able to create and also a gift to receive it. Many letters arrive expressing the joy received from her art. One letter says, “I have a depression problem. Every morning the first thing I do is view each of your seven paintings. They make me smile and help with the new day.” Another, “Every New Years Eve we, husband and wife, have a glass of wine together and think of all the wonderful things that have happened to us in the previous year. We want you to know the joy your paintings have given us and how much we love the time we have spent with the two of you. Please know you are special in our hearts.” There are many more such heartfelt letters in her collection. Many have commented on how humble she was saying, “She has no idea of how good or successful an artist she is”. What a reward to be so acknowledged during one’s lifetime.

Gil is so proud to have been able to care for her and keep her here in the comfort of their home. It was a struggle but not difficult, for her twinkle remained throughout. Jan’s decline was a period of sorrow and joy for her humor did not leave. .

A few years ago Jan and Gil decided to donate their bodies to the U. of M Medical School. Hopefully her gift may help medical science in the future. It is her last gift to humanity.

There will be a visitation at the Staffen Mitchell funeral Home, 9021 N. Main St. Chelsea, Mi. 48118. 734 475 1444 on Sunday, April 11, 1:00 to 3:00. Jan did not like being singled out even for an award. The visitation will be a celebration of her life in keeping with her wishes.

 


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

1995 WINTER PARK SIDEWALK ART FESTIVAL MEETING

Winter Park, FL
November, 1995


On March 15th a dinner meeting for the artists’ organization was held in Winter Park, Florida. Gordon Bruno opened the meeting and the following topics were discussed, voted on and approved:

  1. The name of our organization to be the ASSOCIATION OF ARTFESTIVAL ARTISTS (name and logo conceived by Bo Sterk.)
  2. Filing an application to become a national non-profit organization incorporated in Illinois.
  3. Mission Statement: Our mission is to be a responsible advocate for artists who exhibit their work at art festivals and craft shows.

Bannister Pope carried on the discussion concerning information gathering for National Show Standards such as:

  • Category clarification.
  • Refund policies.
  • Improving jury procedures.
  • Standardized slide labeling.
  • Monitoring displays to see if slides accurately represent work.
  • Optional payment of show fees by credit card.

Ray Hartl presented information on the first newsletter to be ready by June.
Gordon Bruno reported on his meeting with David Cook of Sunshine Artists magazine regarding providing free space in their publication for information on updates about our group.


The next artists’ meeting was scheduled for Old Town weekend, date, time and place to be arranged.

In attendance and voting were:

  • Greg Allen
  • Paul Andrews
  • Beth Appleton
  • Barbara Bate
  • Gordon Bruno
  • Ellie Diez-Massaro
  • Sharon M. Donovan
  • Kathleen Eaton
  • Ben W. Essenburg
  • Dan Gable
  • Ray Hartl
  • Lynn Krause
  • John Krieger
  • Robin Logan
  • Lenny Lyons- Bruno
  • Jody dePew McLeane
  • Banister Pope
  • Rick Preston
  • Larry Rhoads
  • Paula Rothman
  • Vincent Serbin
  • Elinor Splitter
  • Butler Steltemeier
  • Jim Wallace
  • Michael J. Weber

Submitted by Kathleen Eaton – membership

Memorial to Sharon Pikrone

Sharon Ann Pikrone, 1943-2008: botanical watercolorist
Her watercolors had stunning blend of depth and detail
By Joan Giangrasse Kates
January 11, 2009
An accomplished artist, Sharon Ann Pikrone often went to great lengths to capture the detail, delicacy and intensity of color found in the live floral plants she re-created through watercolors.

?My concept is to serve as an artful translator of botanicals for others so that they may awaken to the beauty and brilliance of flora and fauna as it exists in nature and in my mind?s eye,? she wrote in a brief memoir.

A few years ago, she was commissioned to do a watercolor by a Wisconsin couple who owned a large cranberry bog farm.

?They wanted her to re-create the flowering pitcher plants growing at the center of the bog,? recalled her husband of 44 years, Bob. ?So she stepped out into the middle of this thick, wet bog. She sketched for hours and captured as much detail as she could before going back to paint.?

Mrs. Pikrone, 65, of Elburn, a nationally known watercolorist whose unique blend of depth and detail made veins of flowers and greenery seemingly pop from her canvases, died of lung cancer Tuesday, Dec. 9, in her home.

?Her work was extraordinary,? said longtime friend Roger Antes of Lake Forest. ?We have a watercolor of hers with six different flowers that?s so rich in detail. It?s just incredibly beautiful.?

For more than 20 years, Mrs. Pikrone was a frequent exhibitor at art fairs throughout the country, where she often took Best of Show, those close to her say.

?She was invited to every show she ever applied to and her work always stood out,? Antes said.

Born in Minneapolis, Mrs. Pikrone moved with her family to Chicago?s Galewood neighborhood on the West Side when she was 8. After graduating from Steinmetz High School, she attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she studied sculpting.

In 1964, Mrs. Pikrone married her husband, with whom she had three daughters. The couple lived with their children in Oak Park before moving to Elburn 20 years ago.

Mrs. Pikrone put her art on hold while raising her family. One day her husband found in their basement a watercolor she had painted in her teens.

?It was amazingly beautiful, an underwater scene with mermaids and [fish],? he recalled. ?I told her right then and there she had to start painting again.?

By the mid-1980s, Mrs. Pikrone was selling her botanical watercolors at a brisk pace at art fairs and through commissioned projects. She described her paintings as ?a contrast of strong, simple stems and leaves against delicate, fragile, often seductive petals that typically attract me to my favorites: amaryllis, trillium, lotus and orchid.?

?What I respected most was her craftsmanship,? said George Bucher of Sunbury, Pa., a fellow artist and art fair exhibitor. ?She had complete control of her medium. She re-created something real into a decorative image that could still breathe life.?

Other survivors include three daughters, Gayle Richardson, Christy Talbert and Deanne Slapa; a brother, Bruce Sanfillippo; and seven grandchildren.

A memorial celebration is planned for the spring.

The Illinois General Assembly passed a resolution to memorialize her:

SENATE RESOLUTION

WHEREAS, The members of the Illinois Senate are saddened to learn of the death of Sharon Ann Pikrone of Elburn, who passed away on December 9, 2008;

WHEREAS, Sharon Ann Pikrone was born in Minneapolis; she moved with her family to Chicago’s Galewood neighborhood on the West Side when she was eight years old; after graduating from Steinmetz High School, she attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she studied sculpting;

WHEREAS, In 1964, Sharon Ann Pikrone married her husband, Bob; together, they had three daughters; the couple lived with their children in Oak Park before moving to Elburn 20 years ago;

WHEREAS, For more than 20 years, Sharon Ann Pikrone was a frequent exhibitor at art fairs throughout the country, where she was often awarded Best of Show; her watercolor paintings were lauded for their detail, delicacy, and intensity of color;

WHEREAS, Sharon Ann Pikrone is survived by her loving husband, Bob; her daughters, Gayle Richardson, Christy Talbert, and Deanne Slapa; her brother, Bruce Sanfillippo; and her seven grandchildren; therefore, be it RESOLVED, BY THE SENATE OF THE NINETY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, that we mourn, along with her family and friends, the passing of Sharon Ann Pikrone; and be it further RESOLVED, That a suitable copy of this resolution be presented to the family of Sharon Ann Pikrone as an expression of our sympathy.

LETTER TO MEMBERS

November 18, 1996

Dear NAIA members,
Long time, no news. Right? Don’t be discouraged, the association is alive, healthy and productive. The steering committee has been on task all year and though communication with the membership has been limited to the first newsletter, that’s about to change. This letter is the first of what we hope will be bimonthly updates.

The association was formed so that together we might have greater input into shaping the future of our industry. Some of the changes we’re able to effect will be be more quickly realized, while others will be gradual. Ultimately, our effectiveness will rely on our capacity to remain focused on the “the big picture.” We all want more recognition and consideration for our status as professionals. That will be reflected in the degree to which our venues become more artist oriented, and we will work toward that end. Simultaneously, we must promote the health of our industry and thus the growth of our opportunities by maintaining a “what can we do for our industry?,” approach. (Sound familiar? )

You’ll all remember that we began with a series of surveys in which artists were asked to tell us what their concerns were regarding the art fair industry. The most frequently mentioned issues were a lack of standardization in the application process, the need for more good shows, the need for a collective voice in communicating with event producers, insurance and other benefits.

As an association, we’ve already made some very positive inroads. Show directors have been enthusiastically receptive. They welcome the prospect of having a collective artists’ perspective on the strengths and weaknesses of their events. In an effort to promote understanding between shows and the exhibiting artists, we devised a pair of exhaustive surveys that will comprise the bulk of the next newsletter. The first is the collective responses we have already received from a lengthy series of questions put to directors of the top shows in the nation. They were glad to participate and were very forthright in their answers. The second will solicit the viewpoints of you, the artists. The majority opinions gleaned from this survey will become the consensus upon which the shows may base many of their future decisions. Through interactions such as this, the NAIA is establishing its position as the “go to” representative for artists This is one way in which we’ve successfully addressed the artists’ desire to form a collective voice.

Standardization in the application process is another front on which we’ve met with some early success. Dan Gable represented the association at the annual convention of the International Festival and Events Association. For the past two years, the directors of arts festivals have met as a subgroup of the IFEA in arts affinity sessions Dan was able to address this group of about forty and he found them very receptive. At that session they agreed to adopt a standard slide-labeling format. The proposed standard will appear in the next newsletter. Let us know what you think of it.

New shows and better shows was another concern. Again, we’re making progress. Initial contacts have been made with the mayor of Nashville and with the director of the New Orleans Museum of Art. Proposals will be for October shows in these cities . We’ve also been contacted by some of the established smaller shows who are ready to make the leap.

We have spoken with representatives from the insurance industry, which could scarcely be more complicated. To be eligible for a group plan, we must have existed for at least two years. Individual plans are equally tricky, as underwriting considerations very from state to state. So at this point, until a volunteer steps forward to chair a research committee, the insurance is on the back burner.

On the other back burners is the pot in which swim the other artists’ perks. Increased membership will have to provide the flame.

We are able to say, however, that we’re cooking up some nice benefits of our own! Michael Hamilton, who created and continues to maintain our web site, has devised a great plan for members to have their own pages linked to the NAIA address, even those of us who are not yet on-line.

There’s a “Who’s Who Among Exhibiting Artists” directory in the works, inclusive only of NAIA members, which will go to directors, curators, and galleries. There will be more info on both projects in the newsletteror the bimonthly letter which follows that..

The steering committee has spent the majority of its time this year wrestling with the nuts and bolts of incorporation. After months of letters, faxes and phone calls, committee members, each at their own expense, met in Winter Park, Florida, for two days in early November. We spent fourteen hours at a conference table and came away with this; a formal mission statement, a much discussed set of by-laws, a workable channel of communication, a membership policy, interim officers and nine committees.

Just to head off any misunderstanding among the NAIA membership, here’s a sequential explanation of this “instant officers” phenomenon.

The reach of the organization is limited at this juncture by financial restrictions that cannot be wholly overcome by membership dues. In order for us to reach out for broader support we find it necessary to incorporate as a nonprofit entity. Legal requirements require that we formalize a set of bylaws, establish a board of directors, and have an executive board (officers).

In the interest of continuity and expediency, the steering committee appointed officers to hold title on an interim basis until a board of directors is convened and can assume directorial leadership of the association. In the future, the officers of the NAIA will be elected from among the full membership of the association and be confirmed by the board of directors. Your understanding and support of this interim appointment procedure is important, as the credibility of the association requires the trust of all those it represents. It is incumbent on each of us to convey confidence in this decision.

The interim executive board is Banister Pope, president; Larry Oliverson, vice president; Kathy Eaton, secretary; and Dan Gable, treasurer.

It has been suggested that we would be better served by securing leaders for whom the demands of artistic productivity are not a distraction. That may be the case, as the time required to pilot an organization is substantial. Unfortunately, this is a good idea whose time has not yet come. There are two primary reasons; one, the money isn’t there, and two, citing the infancy of the association as a point of vulnerability, many artists are reluctant to grant leadership to someone outside our immediate ranks. So for now, the members of the executive board will have to give as best they can, shepherding control of our agenda and calling on the strengths of our membership. As we gain footing, secure financial support and establish operating policies, the association might do well to enlist professional leadership.

Regarding our board of directors, we will pursue as fine a board as we can enlist, seeking members who can function as advisors in a variety of professional disciplines and who command broad respect within their fields. Please be thinking of persons you know or know of whom you might suggest for inclusion.

If anyone has wondered where the money is, here’s a financial report:

Income from dues: $6985.70

Expenses:

  • $1555.34 newsletter
  • 159.00 K. Eaton – postage
  • 320.00 D. Gable – convention
  • 137.80 meeting room

Total expenses: $2172.14

Upon reflecting on the progress made over the past year, we are encouraged by both the acceptance of the NAIA and by the incredible potential of this organization. If we are at all discouraged, it comes from the realization that we could have been much more effective and accomplished so much more if our efforts had not been limited by the time that we could steal from our families and art. It is becoming apparent that to move forward in a big way, we will need to hire a person who can handle much of the correspondence and paperwork that is so time consuming. To do so will require a large commitment from the artist community, both in the size of the membership and the dues assessed. Membership renewals will be coming up. Details and a membership form will be provided in the next newsletter that will be published in the next few weeks.

We hope each of you will be encouraged by the progress that’s been made. The effort has been constant, even if the communications have not. Although membership grew considerably following the first newsletter, but we’re still way short of where we want to be, so please encourage your colleagues to respond to the forthcoming survey and to get their membership materials in the mail.

Sincerely,
Banister Pope – President
Ray Hartl – Communications Committee

Memorial to Larry Greer

My family lived in Frederick from 1979-1985 and knew Larry and Dana very well. I joined with Larry in many productions of the fledging Community Theatre in Frederick. We have several pieces of Larry’s art and enjoy every one.
– Stan Rzad


What a talent. I have always loved his “Sisters of the Rose”. It doesn’t appear to be in print anymore. If anyone knows otherwise please contact me [email protected]
– Linda Webb


I just learned of Larry’s passing and I am broken hearted. We own five of his unique pieces and treasure them. His wife was always such a delight to visit with when we traveled to War-Eagle. What a loss for the art world and all of us!
– Dawn Wharton


Every year at Weems Artfest my husband, Bill, would make a beeline to Larry’s booth and would come home with at least one piece of his art. He and Dana were so sweet to me when they learned of his passing. I treasure his work though I did share some with my husband’s children. I have missed him though unware why he was no longer at Weems’ show. He left us all some great gifts. Blessings to Dana, she was such a rock for him.
– Gwyneth Paine


Larry died in his sleep Friday night, Sept. 23, 2005. Larry will be missed. He was a wonderful, warm, crusty guy. My heart goes out to Dana and their daughter, Mary.
– Sharon Matusiak

I had the honor to be in one of his clases at the Moore County Art Center in Dumas, Texas back in the early 80’s…..And I saw him again at the Ruidoso Art Festival in ’03 or ‘ 04, I’m not sure……I was always fascinated with the high level of his art….What a talent…..Rest in peace, maestro…!
Manuel S. Franco


Good Afternoon,

I was browsing through some of my old paperwork and I found the pamphlet I got from Larry Greer when I bought some of his work years ago. I met him twice at art shows in Gainesville, FL. The memory is VERY clear because I learned a valuable lesson the first time I met him.

I was admiring one of his original framed silver sketches. It looked like something DaVinci would have done. A large square frame with a very small inset sketch. I must have stared at it for 10-15 minutes. I didn’t buy it right then; I told myself that I would walk the rest of the art show and come back to it. By the time I returned, it was gone and I was devastated. I left with only one purchase, one of his framed reproductions of an angel for my mother.

The next year I saw him again and was completely taken by another original, Study of Michael. I was NOT going to let it happen to me again. I bought the piece immediately. It is the crown jewel of my growing art collection. I have often said that if I could only grab one piece to save during a fire, Greer’s Study of Michael would be the one.

As the years passed, I always looked for Larry at other art shows. And now, finding this pamphlet, I decided to Google his name to see what I could find out. I was shocked to learn of his passing. I cannot express how saddened I am to have lost this artist. I was looking forward to getting more and more of his work for my collection. While it is late, I wanted to express my deepest sympathies to his family and friends. He will be missed. His work is precious to me. I thought that maybe his family or friends would like to know that.

Warmest regards,

Audra Strahl


I, like Audrey, came to know Larry briefly through art festivals. Every year I attend the Boston Mills Art Festival in NE Ohio with my mother. In 2000 she purchased his “Eyes of the World” painting, which also happens to be one of my favorite Grateful Dead song titles. I admired the painting for several years, and in June 2005 bought my own, “The Sage”. Since we bought it, we have looked at the painting with wonder, watching as the silver changes with age, as he said it would. We have looked for him at the Art Fest since then, hoping at the very least to see some of his artwork. I am very saddened to hear of his passing four years ago. I am glad I met him in 2000 and again in 2005. I am grateful I was able to purchase one of his works, it was and is my favorite piece of art.

I was really saddened to read of Larry’s passing. I truly enjoyed meeting him, and we have been wondering why he wasn’t back at Boston Mills Art Fest since that time. I will look at my painting with renewed wonder and enjoyment, and toast it and Larry every chance I get 😉 He really seemed like a nice guy.

With best regards,
Dave Modarelli

GENERAL INFORMATION

Do you exhibit in galleries in addition to participating in festivals?

Yes:77%
No:23%

Why?

  • Supplemental income to shows. (42)
  • Additional exposure to possible sales. (17)
  • I can stay home and produce. (4)
  • A balance of markets is needed; the street shows cant sell the very expensive work.
  • For additional exposure, income & prestige (13)
  • Exposure in a more persistent setting, hopefully reaching additional clientele. (15)
  • Diversification (5)
  • I enjoy the change in venue – Im out of the 10 x 10 space and am not next to other artists.
  • I have difficulty selling on the street.
  • Another venue, but festivals are priority, simply more volume sales with less hassle at shows.
  • The public seems to want the artists whose work they purchase to have those credentials. (7)
  • To capitalize on markets that may not have art fairs or to maintain presence year round in markets w/art fairs that we participate in.
  • Selling furniture at street shows is a real challenge.
  • They ask me to and I cant say no.
  • Wear & tear on us is less w/gallery.
  • Exposure to academics who are generally jurors at festivals.
  • Even though sales are slower, galleries provide promotion, follow up sales and service.
  • and continued sales that are not dependent on jury scores and weather.
  • I like to keep my options open. I want people to see my glass along with that of famous artists.
  • Ive always seen exclusive representation in galleries as a goal. The art shows for me have functioned as a means to that end. For me, the time and energy required to maintain a full show schedule has meant an unhealthy studio life.
  • Provides a local venue. (5)
  • To compete for awards or take advantage of one person shows.

Why not?

  • I can not keep up with retail sales demand for my work. (12)
  • I dont like losing a sales percentage to a gallery. (10)
  • Loss of income and control
  • Poor sales, worse profits (4)
  • Consignment is akin to sin. No payment – no commitment
  • I choose not to because most galleries want me to consign work, and I would rather sell it outright.
  • I like meeting my customers. I dont like galleries taking 50%. I like taking the time out of my studio. (2)
  • In my experience I can sell more in one day at a halfway decent fair than in 6 months in a gallery. I dont have enough stock to leave it just sitting around. (2)
  • I havent connected with a gallery I like yet.
  • I enjoy doing shows and never have enough work for galleries. Difficulty with shipping pieces – very little return for time & effort.
  • Not an efficient way to make a living as an artist Many rip offs.
  • I like being in control of my inventory and the way it is displayed. Plus I enjoy interacting with thepeople who enjoy and purchase my work.
  • Many galleries are not prompt with payment. (3)
  • It is difficult to find galleries that pay on time- if ever. My work is not speedy, I cannot surrender it to someone who does not pay or allow me to exhibit in their state as they want sole representation.
  • I like doing both, but galleries are frustrating. They often dont display work well, dont know enough about work, dont pay on time and will lie to you. I like interacting directly with the people who buy my work and have it in their houses. I display my work better and customers end up having a better understanding & appreciation of the work when we can communicate directly.
  • Ours is one of a kind, expensive, and needs showing. Galleries can be more trouble than they are worth.

If yes, how many galleries?

1-2….22%
3-5….44%
6-10….22%
11-20….6%
over 20….6%

How often?

Regularly: 73%
Occasionally: 27%

Do you wholesale your work?

Yes: 41%
No: 59%

What wholesale shows do you recommend?

  • Baltimore ACE (20)
  • Rosen Shows (8)
  • Art Buyers Caravan (3)
  • Art Expo (3)I would recommend Art Expo in New York only if you can afford 2 or more booths (do not go into the emerging artists area), have all the visual aids, i.e. brochures of your work, etc. and a network of salespeople to follow up leads and continue to market your work after the show. A nice fat advertising budget is nice too. Galleria in New York is not as polished but here again you need more than one booth because you will get lost among the big boys (national publishers) and you will need that sales network to really make 2D work wholesale feasible. Even then you can lose your shirt real fast because of the expense involved for a great marketing program. Of course you must also be some sort of a multiples artist or a mass producer with a staff of doers and of course, as the artist, lots of creative ideas to keep the flow of new work out there and good managerial skills to manage works.
Have you exhibited or do you exhibit in museum/university shows?

Yes: 63% No: 37%

Other venues?

  • Studio Show (16)
  • National juried shows (13)
  • State juried shows (5)
  • International juried shows (2)
  • Web Page (4)
  • Internet Gallery
  • Restaurants (3)
  • Civic buildings (3)
  • Art centers (4)
  • Designer show houses (3)
  • Workshops at Art Centers, Universities
  • Some historical site demo/sales
  • Home furnishing stores
  • Magazine and book illustration (2)
  • Banks
  • Country clubs
  • Private collectors shows
  • Local Music Festival
  • Gift shops (2)
  • Trunk Shows
  • Guild shows (2)
  • Outdoor environment corporate space
  • Mail order catalog
  • Private Clubs or Companies
  • Benefit shows – to benefit a charity or group, which generally keep a percentage.
  • Reps / Agents who place corporate work (2)
  • Alternative Spaces: Arts Council Galleries, High Schools, Jr. College Galleries, Law Firms
  • Work shops at colleges that have galleries

GREATEST IMPROVEMENTS:

What do you see as the greatest improvements in the industry over the past five years?

  • Shows starting to pay attention to needs and advice of artists because of NAIA. (48)
  • Show organizers are increasingly treating artists as professionals. (26)
  • Competition to get into good shows has resulted in higher quality exhibitors. (27)
  • Standardization of Application procedures.
  • Prospectuses are more careful to detail the rules and provide the information that artists need to know. (15)
  • The standardization of the slide formats, thanks to NAIA effort. (13)
  • Greater marketing of the top shows. Marketing the shows as a special place to BUY great art, not to get bargains (17)
  • Development of some exceptional shows (18) i.e. Cherry Creek and St. Louis.
  • More educated and savvy customers. More of the art buying public seem to consider shows a viable & even desirable alternative to galleries. (13)
  • The quality and availability of display materials (tents, walls) & services (booth shipping & storage). (10)
  • Efforts among shows to attract a higher number of applicants and a larger public attendance by improving quality, advertising, amenities, etc (13)
  • More places are understanding that high quality art shows are good for the economy and the community.
  • Good promoters and artists communicating with the public.
  • The jurors seem better informed and better qualified. Better jurying for some shows (4)
  • Some effort to minimize buy/sell & proxy exhibitors (3)
  • Tightening of rules against mechanically produced reproductions.
  • Better overall economy which has nothing to do with the industry at all. (3)
  • More security (3)
  • Some shows have sought out artists feedback – really listen to complaints and compliments, and are willing to act on them. (3)
  • A dialogue has started between promoters and exhibitors and just between each other. (2)
  • Information! More information is available about shows through magazines, sourcebooks, internet. (7)
  • No improvements (4)
  • Some of the best things that have happened are Kenneth Trapp, Bill Charney (2), Dale Chihuly, Greg Lawler and the Art Fair Source Book, and periodicals and books addressing the craft world. These individuals, organizations and reference tools are invaluable resources for artists, crafts people participating in our industry. I personally do as much reading as I can on the world of art and craft. There are many movers and shakers (artists, promoters and organizations) whose contributions are in the process of fundamentally reshaping the perception of art versus craft in contemporary culture. Outdoor festivals and art shows are also reshaping the way the public accesses art. Credibility for this venue seems to be increasing as professionalism pervades our industry. My feeling is that the achievements of the past few years are paving the way for increased public respect for this type of venue and the art exhibited there. Based on the players involved and the increasing inroads fine craft is making into the fine art world, I expect this trend to continue and gain momentum in the decade to come.
  • Attempts to look at production issues.
  • Spaces that are 10 by 12 and 10 by 14, not 10 by 10. (2)
  • Early set-up, booth sitters Lights at outdoor shows or under festival tents.
  • Occasional availability of reliable electricity Shows dropping limited editions on photos.
  • Better program directories.
  • Clarity of mission by good shows Internet access and presence. (2)
  • NAIA Newsletter and the NAIA web site.
  • Exhibitors and shows are waking up to the professionalism necessary to make it to the top.
  • More education by artists to the public about what it is to be an independent artist and the processes involved in their work. Necessity is the Mother…
  • Better organized committees, more paid Executive Directors.
  • Festivals getting newspaper, TV, radio sponsorship which comes with full media coverage of event. That is the best possible advertisement. Increased public education about event.
  • The development of art fair professionals consulting with small shows to develop better venues.
  • Sponsors with deep pockets (but of course they want it BIGGER!)
  • Hospitality areas.
  • Some higher rated shows accepting mix of larger & smaller priced items.
  • More port-a-potties (this is not a joke).

ISSUES TO ADDRESS:

As an NAIA member which issues within the industry would you most like to see our association address?

  • The ongoing problem of having to pay booth fees for shows before knowing what shows we are even accepted into. It is expensive and makes planning very difficult. Better refund policies in any case are sorely needed.(43)
  • The public deserves to know how a product is made: by an individual artist or a production studio – is it an original or a reproduction? There are enough shows to exhibit all of them. (30)
  • The elimination of Reproductions! Stay with it until they are no longer permitted with originals. (10)
  • Encouraging shows to enforce their rules. (12)
  • Find a way to eliminate buy/sell artists – educate public to know the difference. (4)
  • No reps in shows for original artists only. (6)
  • Standardization of application forms. (20)
  • Standardization of slide labeling. (16)
  • Continue in the direction you are going. Continue to work with outdoor festival promoters to improve their professionalism in working effectively with artists, the communities in which their show takes place and the public who attend these events. Overall improvement in these areas will enhance the prestige of these events. This will have a beneficial effect on everyone involved. (13)
  • Helping start top-quality shows in or near cities that have no venue at this time – or several poor venues. (11)
  • I would like to see the development of new venues – particularly indoor fine art shows. (2)
  • Jury, booth fees and other fees have started to rise, efforts should be made to slow these increases. (8)
  • Professional jurying & disclosure of process. (11)
  • Exhibiting artists on juries. (3)
  • More on-street jurying (slide exempt). (4)
  • Feedback from jurors. (3)
  • Getting us group deals on hotels, art materials, travel, insurance policies, visa systems, etc. (9)
  • Better recognition of needs of the artist to make it convenient to do a show – exhibitor logistics. (10)
  • I would like to see more shows devote large portions of their expenses to marketing, promotion and advertising. And to see this as an investment, a long term campaign from the shows point of view. (6)
  • Education of the public. (7)
  • Media categories – where works of art are basically one media but may include other media. What category do you put work in? Mixed media is a bad catch all category. (4)
  • Get more high-quality shows to accept digital art and have a category for it. (2)
  • Discussion on not penalizing artists if they show work out of category. We have to grow and some of the enforcement things you are advocating will destroy that possibility for expansion. (4)
  • Expanding the use of the internet by the NAIA and shows. (2)
  • More education of artists as to successfully competing to get into shows (2)
  • Artists participation on some level in local show production. (2)
  • For the NAIA to increase membership so that it represents a fuller spectrum of all artists who participate in art shows and to increase our influence in the business. (2)
  • Art shows should be about art, not music, food, and kiddie stuff – sometimes the art is at the bottom of the list. (2)
  • Education/dialog among artists on issues & events. (2)
  • Uniformity in application deadline and notification times. (2)
  • Honesty about number of spots that are actually being juried. (2)
  • Booth sizes and layout – every show should provide a 12 by 12 space for a 10 by 10 tent. It is ridiculous to set up tent pole to tent pole and back to back. (2)
  • Rating/listing of shows independent of AFSB or Harris or others. (2)
  • Concerning workshops; There are so many organizations that already offer workshops & retreats. I hope NAIA keeps its focus on the things it can do, that are not being addressed elsewhere.(2)
  • New markets for selling our art. (2)
  • Smaller high quality shows (under 250 exhibitors). (2)
  • Continuing to present independent artists as a well-organized coalition Perception of Festival Artists as accomplished professionals. (2)
  • Whether NAIA itself is to remain an objective consulting organization or become a subjective policing organization.
  • Excellence – What is it? Whos got it?
  • Maintaining unique flavor of individual shows Product info.
  • Exempting metal category entrants from separate jewelry entry.
  • Setting standard for acceptance (or not) of computer art.
  • Shows that dont allow painters to have prints but allow photographers to have posters, post cards, etc.
  • Reproductions of photographs – I think the so-called discussion by NAIA totally sidestepped the issue. (The issues were discussed by a group of photographers – some were NAIA members and some not. Ed.)
  • Respect and recognition of realistic artists as creative and unique – objectivity from the academic world.
  • Any way you might promote democracy in ACC? Does ACC even know/care that we exist?
  • More contact with publications- e.g. Crafts Report, Sunshine Artists, various art & Photo mags. Become a source for artist viewpoint.
  • Subjective directors cut after the jury.
  • Notification within one month of slide deadline.
  • What do show producers want to see in a booth display slide? (For the answer check the minutes of our January meeting with show directors. These are on the NAIA web page.)
  • Promoters who dont give early enough notification of admittance. To plan efficiently I need 3-4 months. Some shows dont give more than 2 or even less.
  • Booth assignments before arrival.
  • Prior day set up with over night storage space.
  • Artist information statements.
  • I hate Porta Potties, especially when there is no place to wash your hands!
  • Standing in long lines to pay for % fees at end of this kind of show. Some like Pacific NW Arts Fair have waits up to 4 hours!
  • Disclosure on where show fees go. Dollar amounts – we pay for it and ought to have the right to see where our money goes. Bellevues Rest of the Best is the ONLY show that offers this info. Charitable Causes says nothing.
  • I would like to see NAIA do more to help artists who get a raw deal from shows.
  • Opportunities for work/study grants, such as is available in Europe – this would mean a break from the art fair rat race to renew and be creative.
  • Copy right protection.
  • How an artist can build a good reputation, really get ahead in this business of art.
  • More quality shows in the Northeast.
  • Ways to attract collectors i.e. market research.
  • Retreats, tours.
  • A better way for all good artists to somehow participate on a rotation basis in the best shows.
  • As you already have been doing: to demonstrate that most artists are responsible professionals.

ARTISTS RETREATS/WORKSHOPS:

Some members have expressed an interest in artists retreats/workshops. Would you participate if the NAIA developed this type of thing?

Yes: 53%
No: 28%
Maybe: 19%

The time of year most frequently mentioned as convenient was the winter with the following months preferred (in descending order) January, February, November, December, March, April, & May.

RULE ENFORCEMENT:

What are the best mechanisms youve seen to deal with the problem of rule enforcement?

  • A clear statement of all rules and expectations in initial application. (see prospectus of the Old Town Art Fair, Chicago99) Make rules unambiguous & enforceable. (14)
  • Booth slide part of contract with show.
  • Artists on slide juries Photo ID at check in. (19)
  • Artists Information Statement in booth. (5)
  • A trained committee (it is suggested they sit on the slide jury) that actually checks booths against slides daily. (65) i.e. Winter Park, Cherry Creek, State College
  • On site jurying (13) i.e. Ann Arbor Street Art Fair, 57th Street, TACA Nashville.
  • Peer jurors who monitor the exhibits and report to the show staff who then takes prompt action to ensure compliance (16)
  • The first and foremost response here is very simple – if the show does not have a way to enforce the rules that they have set down then they should not have the rule in the first place. I think too many of them feel that just putting the rule in their prospectus is enough. Perhaps some just put it in their prospectus to make themselves sound like big shows or to entice quality exhibitors. Virginia Beach sidewalk art show enforces their no reproduction rule by stating exactly what you can do (have a brochure posted on images available as reproductions – can sell mail order but not at show or out of motel room) and they will come around the show the entire 4 days checking, sometimes even undercover, to make sure no exhibitor is breaking this rule. It also has show officials check your booth everyday, several times a day to make sure you have brought out nothing new that breaks a rule. Shows that confront exhibitors which are suspected of showing other peoples work or work in a production studio and they are not the artist – Chesterton, Indiana and Tarpon Springs -they also take the word of other exhibitors that this is suspected and then go check it out themselves. Both shows asked the exhibitors in question to leave, even though the exhibitors were already set up.
  • Enforce the rule on the spot. Throw the offending exhibitor out even if the show is open. (11) i.e. DMAF
  • Confront the offending artists & have the work removed. Not at their booth – they (the artists) should be summoned by the director & told off grounds (6)
  • Show director should warn exhibitor of not complying with rules. If not adhered to, should then make exhibitor pack down and leave. (6)
  • Have a graceful and clear person to do the confronting (not a fellow exhibitor !!! and not a bully manager). If the infraction is minor or gray area a letter after the show is over is sometimes best, a warning letter, then the staff is obliged to watch that exhibitor the following year. (2)
  • Force flagrant violators to leave show at end of day thereby minimizing disruption.
  • Warning (verbal or written) followed with statement barring applicant from the following years show (4)
  • 1 year off (3)
  • 2 yr. ban from show and loss of booth space (2)
  • Minimum 3 yr. exclusion from show Refuse future admission forever. (9)
  • Artists signature on real contract required for show participation
  • Photo Badges
  • Photo ID of artist at time of application (2)
  • Opportunity for the rule breakers to appeal
  • A strong festival director/staff that does not change from year to year
  • A centralized list of offending parties so that these people cannot simply move from show to show
  • Panel of artists to mediate between artist violator & show committee
  • Place burden of proof of production methods on the artist. Example: This wont fly, but Id gladly show a tax return to prove scale of my operation.
  • Have trial by peers where 3 exhibitors in media affected are called (by random selection?) to voice an opinion of the alleged violation. Eliminates politics & the show artists share responsibility for enforcement of rules.
  • Jurors going to visit studios (2)
  • Mich. Guild has published established procedures for determining, documenting and resolving rules problems. (2)
  • Letter to artist explaining problem
  • Death penalty
  • Reproductions – supply loupes i.e. magnifying glass to the committee to look for laser lines and offset rosette patterns (3)
  • Carry over of violation information from one years committee to the next. If you repeat you are barred.
  • An enforcer designated by name and listed in show info. so artists could go to this person with their complaint. Complaining after the show has questionable results.
  • Follow the rules themselves (i.e. St. Louis allows no reproductions yet sells a reproduction of an artists work in the show as a money-maker, calling it a lithograph).
  • Lines of communication open so that artists know whom to make complaints to – art show personnel who follow up and enforce the rules.

Other comments:

  • One thing that shows need to realize and perhaps it should be pointed out to them is that when things get out of hand, they turn into flea markets. So making realistic rules that they can enforce is crucial to their well-being. Those of us that are professional just want to know what the rules are and then we can make a decision as to whether or not we wish to participate in the event, abiding by the rules.
  • It depends on the violation – how I feel about it, but I have no trouble talking to the staff if an artist has just sent a rep to do the show. Otherwise I think it is important to talk to the person yourself before spreading a story. (4)
  • If the show is aggressive (in dealing w/offender) I will be too.
  • Grouse about it to my neighbor
  • Write letter of follow-up to show & staff to indicate importance of situation & way to prevent in future (3)
  • The artists are peers, and should treat each other as such
  • In writing, anonymously. Perhaps this could be turned into a volunteer at the end of the show.
  • Report to a violation box that is monitored regularly by staff. Booth #/name required OK but request anonymity from show artists & reporter of violation would be exempt from the peer trial jury of the artists he/she complained against. If total anonymity even from staff/volunteers is desired, odds of complainant being selected for jury are small enough to not worry about. (2)
  • A standard procedure needs to be developed – a format standard for show officials to follow. (3)
  • I usually only write my complaints on a shows questionnaire and report offense on the art fair survey at the end of the show. (3)
  • If a show has a stated procedure for reporting a violation to a qualified enforcement staff, I would do so – if not, I would do nothing. (3)
  • It is only worth reporting if the show committee is willing to confront the exhibitor and enforce their own rules – usually they dont!!! (2)
  • Artists should not have to be police but have the option to choose shows that are well enforced.

If you become aware of a violation, what action are you willing to take?

Report to Staff or Committee: 81%
Confront the Offender: 10%
Do nothing, not my problem: 9%

Is anonymity important?

Yes: 69%
No: 31%

Memorial to Mo Dana

From Stephen King:

NOVEMBER 9, 2006, DES MOINES, IOWA ? Mo Dana passed away in her sleep this morning, November 9, 2006, at Mercy Hospice in Johnston, Iowa.

Throughout her tenure as the executive director of the Des Moines Arts Festival and subsequently the director of the Downtown Events Group, Mo Dana received countless accolades from the local press, prominent business and community leaders, close friends, and casual acquaintances.

In her ten years in Des Moines, Mo was named a local woman of influence, as well as America?s best arts festival director. Des Moines presented her with a key to the city; a local publication even suggested a postage stamp be designed in Mo?s likeness. But, perhaps the most fitting tribute was the title Mo received from an annual best-of-Des Moines list when she was dubbed Best Human Dynamo. Dynamo was the Mo we knew and loved. Dynamo is the way Mo lived her life. It?s how she got things done. In Mo?s own words, ?I?m not good at moderation, and what I do I tend to do to a ridiculous extent.?

Mo loved her job, the arts festival, Des Moines, and the state of Iowa. She promoted her adopted city and state tirelessly to whomever would listen or could help her get things done to improve the quality of life here. She was an avid Cyclone fan, especially football and women?s basketball. She was honored to attend practices for both sports, was named an honorary coach for the football team?s intra-squad games, and became a moving fixture on the sidelines for regular-season ISU football games.

Mo laughed easily, and loudly, always spoke her mind without hesitation, and pushed for the things in which she believed ? especially her family and friends. She was once described as possessing an ?unlimited reservoir of energy and a don?t-take-no-for-an-answer spirit.? It served you well in this life, Mo. Take it with you and give ?em hell. We?ll miss you.

Monique (Mo) Dana was born in South Bend, Indiana, on March 8, 1954. The Dana family lived in several East coast cities throughout Mo?s youth, as did Mo in her adult life as a professional horse trainer before moving to Iowa in the mid-1990s. She is survived by her mother, Christiane Laroque Dana, 81; her brother, Gregory Dana; sister-in-law, Joyce Dana; five nieces; and many close friends whom she considered her family. She is preceded in death by her father, Richard Dana.

Plans for a celebration of Mo?s life are pending and will be announced at a later date. Memorial contributions can be sent to Mercy Cancer Center, c/o The Mercy Foundation, 1111 6th Avenue, Des Moines, IA 50314.


Very sad news about Mo Dana. She was definitely one of a kind. I only got to do her show once but was very impressed with her abilities and the way she conveyed her appreciation for her exhibitors. You felt that the moment you stepped into their temporary headquarters. Its always a top down thing. If the Director has problems with artists then the volunteers have problems. Mo didn’t have problems with exhibitors or the police or apparently her board. She nipped that stuff in the bud and got the job done.

She was a big supporter of the NAIA, attended the Directors Conference and the town hall meeting’s that were held during her show. She was definitely tuned in to what was going on in our profession.

She was also one of those larger then life people. She would light up a room or a discussion. And then she’d be off and as she left you sort of wanted to go with her because you just knew its was going to be doing something interesting.

Some of you guys knew her a lot better then I did. There’s a story about how she dealt with the police when attempting to place a sponsor’s cars on a pier. I don’t want to mess it up so hopefully someone will remember that story and maybe a few more.

Rick Bruno


Rick, Mo was as you say one of a kind. The world sorely needs, more than ever, the real unpretentious character that was Mo. I really miss her, and now we all need her personality and force of will more than ever.

I was at a gas station in Wyoming and my cell phone was ringing, it was Mo and she called to tell me she had great news- her cancer could not be found- a miracle for sure! I asked her if I could tell everyone and she yelled “HELL YES I AM TELLING EVERYONE”! The news of her reentering hospice and now her death are blows to my heart and to all who were priviledged to know her. I think of all my rewarding times with NAIA over the years, getting to know Mo was the top prize.

Thanks for reminding me of the car parking story. Mo told me she had sold the right to park Mercedes Benzs on the banks of the river at the art show as a sponsor promotion. After the first year some coronel in the Army Corp of Engineers (who manage those very river banks) calls Mo up and says “who gave you permission to park cars on my levees”? Mo replied “what the fuck is a levee”! The coronel said the river banks are a levee and she could not park them there and she responded “I got $50,000 for the right to park those cars there and they were doing it again next year”! The next year the cars were back and the coronel was now on her Board of Directors! Thats the Mo Dana we loved and lost.

Bob Briscoe


She really was an inspiration, could never do enough for the show, for the artists; you had a good suggestion, and her response was “Done”.

One of my favorites occurred during setup when she stopped by, and I mentioned that she had done quite a job landscaping all the port-a-johns (mounds of mulch, and bushes, trees and flowers), which sat on the street at the end of the bridge. She shook her head and said, “I ordered green port-a-johns and they brought blue ones, looks terrible………but they’ll be changing them”. A little while later, all green.

Mo also had a huge fountain, practically a garden set up on one of the bridges, with stone and soil, etc. It’s all set up and the, I guess it was a city engineer ( a rather “large” fellow), came by and informed her that there was too much weight on the bridge. Mo’s response, “Well, then you better get off “.

As you say Bob, that was the Mo we loved and lost….Michael Kopald


That was the year Mo put me in a spot that was under a large tree with huge low branches, making it impossible to set up the tent. I casually mentioned to her that I thought the booth spot was fine for people her size, but perhaps normal height people might have a problem. Her response was to move me down by those porta potties, and we had a helluva good laugh over it. It actually was a great spot, and yes, it looked like the Butchart Gardens with all the landscaping to hide them. There was never a time since then that, whenever I would see her, she told me I better “watch my ass” or she’d see I ended up by the porta potties. She said it again this year, as she walked through the show, I will never forget it.

I told Blythe that I feel Mo is (can’t bring myself to say “was”) one of the most important people in my life, many of our lives, even those who never met her. Not “close”, perhaps, as we often think of close, but then again, maybe. I feel a profound sense of loss, but also richly rewarded for having the opportunity to know her.

When I was editor of the NAIA newsletter, we ran an interview with Mo:

https://naia-artists.org/work/newsletter_pdf/2002_fall.pdf

Don Ament


This was the story I was going to share that Mo had told. I can hear her gravely laugh as she finished telling the story.

I had to cancel the Des Moines Show the year of my breast cancer and I recieved a full booth refund. There was never any question that you knew you would be treated fairly and with the utmost consideration by Mo and her show. Forgive me Stephen King, but I will always think of the Des Moines Show as Mo’s.

Linda Steinworth


I only met her a few times but I think that Human Dynamo aptly describes her. She told us the car story. She’d gotten a hefty sponsorship deal from a local car dealer, maybe Mercedes Benz. She parked those cars on display on the Levee. Well she got calls from the Army Corps of Engineers to remove them, she responded “what’s a levee?” When told that they had to go because it might compromise the levee she said that “Hell No, they don’t go before Sunday Night, I’ve got $100,000 of their money in sponsorship to park those cars there and that’s where they are staying until then.” They stayed. Mo had moxie, and somewhere in heaven she’s organizing something right now.

Martha Giberson


This is such sad new–i had hoped she was beating her illness. all festival directors could only hope to be as good as Mo—i rem her saying at one of our directors’ conf–whatever she could do to keep costs down for the artist–how ever she could put another dollar in their pocket she would.she was such an arts advocate in every way.

rick’s right, she was a major supporter of NAIA–and because of her we gained much credibility with other festival directors.

she had so many friends in the business–we used to tease Mo,shary brown, and beth hoffman–called them “larry’s angels”(ref.larry oliverson–our former executive director) as they hopped into Mo’s sports car.

she was the best!

wherever she is—its a better place now–and will be a bit more arts friendly!!

love ya Mo,

Toni Mann


Here are some links to the stories in today’s Des Moines newspaper and televison’s website about MO!

> http://www.kcci.com/index.html?refresh=1200
> www.whotv.com
> www.dmregister.com

I am saddened by her death and honored that I had the opportunity to work with MO. NAIA was responsible for many of us(Show Directors) to have experienced each others work and personalities.
Thank you for introducing me to a fantastic colleague!

Cindy Fitzpatrick


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

THE SHOW INFORMATION PAGE (PRINTABLE)

4 Bridges Arts Festival/Assoc. for Visual Artists
Address: 30 Frazier Ave, Ste A
City/State/ZIP: Chattanooga, TN 37405-3931
Phone: 423-265-4282
Fax: 423-265-5233
Email: [email protected]
Website: 4bridgesartsfestival.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

4th Street Festival
Address: P.O. Box 1257
City/State/ZIP: Bloomington, IN 47402-1257
Phone: 812-334-3058
Fax:
Email:
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Allentown Art Festival
Address: P.O. Box 1566 Ellicott Station
City/State/ZIP: Buffalo, NY 14205-1566
Phone: 716-881-4269
Fax:
Email:
Website: www.allentownartfestival.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Amdur Productions
Address: 90 Oakwood Lane
City/State/ZIP: Lincolnshire, IL 60069
Phone: 847-444-9600
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.amdurproductions.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

American Craft Council
Address: 72 Spring Street
City/State/ZIP: New York, NY 10012
Phone: 212-274-0630
Fax: 212-274-0650
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.craftcouncil.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

American Craft Exposition
Address: 32 Indian Hill Road
City/State/ZIP: Winnetka, IL 60093-3940
Phone: 847-571-6631
Fax: 847-446-3375
Email: [email protected]
Website: americancraftexpo.org
2006 Date: Aug 25 – 27 (Aug 24 preview)
2007 Date:

American Craft Marketing
Address: PO Box 480
City/State/ZIP: Slate Hill, NY 10973
Phone: 845-355-2400
Fax: 845-355-2444
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.americancraftmarketing.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Ann Arbor South University Art Fair
Address: P O Box 4525
City/State/ZIP: Ann Arbor, MI 48106
Phone: 734-663-5300
Fax: 734-663-5303
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date: July 19-22
2007 Date:

Ann Arbor Street Art Fair
Address: P.O. Box 1352
City/State/ZIP: Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1352
Phone: 734-994-5260
Fax: 734-994-0504
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.artfair.org
2006 Date: July 19-22
2007 Date:

Ann Arbor Summer Art Fair/The Guild of Artists and Artisans
Address: 118 N. 4th Ave.
City/State/ZIP: Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Phone: 734-662-3382
Fax: 734-662-0339
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.michiganguild.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Apollo Beach Manatee Arts Festival
Address: 6432 U.S. Highway 41 N.
City/State/ZIP: Apollo Beach, FL 33572
Phone: 813-645-1366
Fax: 813-641-2612
Email:
Website: blue2bts.city2city.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Armonk Outdoor Art Show/Friends of the North Castle Public Library
Address: One Boulder Trail
City/State/ZIP: Armonk, NY 10504-0008
Phone: 914-273-9706
Fax: 914-273-4476
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.armonkoutdoorartshow.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date: September 29-30

Art And Soul Of South End
Address: 128 South Tryon St., Suite 1960
City/State/ZIP: Charlotte, NC 28202
Phone: 704-332-2227
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.artandsoulofsouthend.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Art & Apples Festival – Paint Creek Center for the Arts
Address: 407 Pine Street
City/State/ZIP: Rochester, MI 48307
Phone: 248-651-4110
Fax:
Email:
Website: www.pccart.org/art_&_apples.htm
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Art for Fine Living
Address: 8 Lily Pond Court
City/State/ZIP: Rockville, MD 20852
Phone: 301-816-6960
Fax: 202-478-1880
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Art in the Park – Appleton Art Center
Address: 111 W. College Ave.
City/State/ZIP: Appleton, WI 54911
Phone: 920-733-4089
Fax: 920-733-4149
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.appletonartcenter.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Art In The Park – Plymouth
Address: P.O. Box 702490
City/State/ZIP: Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: 734-454-1314
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.artinthepark.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Art in your Eye Fine Art Show
Address:
City/State/ZIP: Batavia, IL
Phone:
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Art in your Eye Fine Art Show in Batavia, IL
Address: 43W854 Red Oak Dr.
City/State/ZIP: Elburn, IL 60119-9751
Phone: 630-557-2222
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

ArtFest Fort Myers
Address: 1400 Jackson St, Ste 104
City/State/ZIP: Fort Myers, FL 33901-2863
Phone: 239-768-3602
Fax: 239-337-0803
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.artfestfortmyers.com
2006 Date: Feb. 3-4
2007 Date: Feb. 2-3

ArtiGras Fine Arts Festival
Address: 3970 RCA Blvd., Suite 7010
City/State/ZIP: Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410
Phone: 561-694-2300
Fax: 561-694-0126
Email: [email protected]
Website: ArtiGras.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date: Feb 16-18

Artisphere
Address: 16 August St
City/State/ZIP: Greenville, SC 29601
Phone: 864-271-9398 or 864-271-9355
Fax: 864-467-3133
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.artisphere.us/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Artrider Productions Inc
Address: P O Box 28
City/State/ZIP: Woodstock, NY 12498-0028
Phone: 845-331-7900
Fax: 845-331-7484
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.artrider.com/
2006 Date: Please refer to website.
2007 Date: Please refer to website.

Arts in the Alley
Address: P.O. Box 2130
City/State/ZIP: Purcellville, VA 20134-2130
Phone: 540-668-7118
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.loudonsbest.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Arts in the Park
Address: 4745 Poplar Avenue, Ste. 311
City/State/ZIP: Memphis, TN 38117
Phone: 901-761-1278
Fax: 901-761-4147
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.memphisartsfestival.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Atalaya Arts & Crafts Festival/Huntington Beach State Park
Address: 1205 Pendleton St., Room 505
City/State/ZIP: Columbia, SC 29201
Phone: 803-734-0450
Fax:
Email:
Website: www.discoversouthcarolina.com/agency/atalayafestival.asp
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Austin Fine Arts Festival
Address: P.O. Box 5705
City/State/ZIP: Austin, TX 78763
Phone: 512-495-9224 ext. 300
Fax: 512-495-9029
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.austinfineartsfestival.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Bay Harbor Art Fair – Audree Levy Art Fairs
Address:
City/State/ZIP: Bay Harbor, MI
Phone:
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.levyartfairs.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Bayou City Art Festival – Art Colony Assoc.
Address: PO Box 66650
City/State/ZIP: Houston, TX 77266-6650
Phone: 713-521-0133
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.bayoucityartfestival.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Bellevue Art Museum Fair
Address: 510 Bellevue Way
City/State/ZIP: Bellevue, WA 90084
Phone: 425-519-0742
Fax: 426-637-1799
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.bellevuearst.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Bethesda Row Arts Festival/Arts on the Pike
Address: 8 Lily Pond Court
City/State/ZIP: Rockville, MD 20852-4230
Phone: 301-816-6960
Fax: 202-478-1880
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.bethesdarowarts.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Birmingham Fine Art Festival/Birmingham Bloomfield Art Center
Address: 1516 S Cranbrook Rd
City/State/ZIP: Birmingham, MI 48009-1855
Phone: 248-644-0866
Fax: 248-644-7904
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.bbartcenter.org/
2006 Date: May 13-14
2007 Date:

Boardwalk Art Show
Address: 2200 Parks Ave.
City/State/ZIP: Virginia Beach, VA 23451-4062
Phone: 757-425-0000
Fax: 757-425-8186
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Boca Raton Museum Of Art Outdoor Juried Art Festival
Address: 501 Plaza Real, Mizner Park
City/State/ZIP: Boca Raton, FL 33432
Phone: 561-392-2500
Fax: 561-391-6410
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.bocamuseum.org/
2006 Date: Feb 11-12
2007 Date:

Breckenridge Art Fairs
Address: P.O. Box 2938
City/State/ZIP: Breckenridge, CO 80424-2938
Phone: 970-547-9326
Fax: 970-547-9326
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Broad Ripple Art Fair
Address: 820 E 67Th St
City/State/ZIP: Indianapolis, IN 46220-1139
Phone: 317-295-2464
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.indplsartcenter.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Brookside Art Annual
Address: 3920 W 69th Terr
City/State/ZIP: Prairie Village, KS 66208-2601
Phone: 913-362-9668
Fax: 913-362-1658
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.brookside.kc.org
2006 Date: May 5-7
2007 Date:

Bruce Museum Art Festival
Address:
City/State/ZIP: Greenwich, CT
Phone:
Fax:
Email:
Website: www.brucemuseum.com/festivals.html
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Bumbershoot: The Seattle Arts Festival
Address:
City/State/ZIP: Seattle, WA
Phone:
Fax:
Email:
Website: www.bumbershoot.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Central Pennsylvania Festival Of The Arts
Address: P.O. Box 1023
City/State/ZIP: State College, PA 16804-1023
Phone: 814-237-3682
Fax: 814-237-0708
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.arts-festival.com/
2006 Date: July 13-16
2007 Date:

Charlevoix Waterfront Art Fair
Address: Box 57
City/State/ZIP: Charlevoix, MI 49720-0057
Phone: 231-547-2675
Fax: 616-547-4753
Email:
Website: CharlevoixWaterfrontArtFair.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Charlotte Arts Festival
Address: 128 S. Tryon Street, Ste. 1960
City/State/ZIP: Charlotte , NC 28209
Phone: 704-332-2227
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.charlotteartsfestival.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Cherry Creek Arts Festival
Address: 2 Steele St. Suite B-100
City/State/ZIP: Denver, CO 80206-6265
Phone: 305-355-2787
Fax: 303-355-2788
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.cherryarts.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Chicago Botanic Garden Art Festival
Address:
City/State/ZIP: Glencoe, IL
Phone:
Fax:
Email:
Website: www.amdurproductions.com/botanic/index.html
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Christmas Jubilee
Address: 3350 SW Idaho St.
City/State/ZIP: Portland, OR 97239-1048
Phone: 503-293-1884
Fax: 503-296-5534
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.christmasjubilee.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Chrysler Arts, Beats & Eats
Address: 30 N. Saginaw, Suite 400
City/State/ZIP: Pontiac, MI 48342
Phone: 248-334-4600
Fax: 248-334-2474
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.artsbeatseats.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Coconut Grove Arts Festival
Address: 3427 Main Highway
City/State/ZIP: Miami, FL 33133
Phone: 305-447-0401 Ext. 22
Fax: 305-447-1499
Email:
Website: www.coconutgroveartsfest.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Columbus Arts Festival
Address: 100 East Broad Street, Suite 2250
City/State/ZIP: Columbus, OH 43215-4200
Phone: 614-224-2606
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.gcac.org/artsfest/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Common Ground Sanctuary Art in the Park
Address: 1410 S Telegraph Rd
City/State/ZIP: Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-0046
Phone:
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.ArtinthePark.info
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Craft Boston – The Society of Arts & Crafts
Address: 175 Newbury Street
City/State/ZIP: Boston, MA 02116
Phone: 617-266-1810
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.societyofcrafts.org
2006 Date: March 31 – April 2
2007 Date:

CraftProducers
Address: PO Box 300
City/State/ZIP: Charlotte, VT 05445
Phone: 802-425-3399
Fax: 802-425-3711
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.craftproducers.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Crosby Festival Of The Arts
Address: 5403 Elmer Dr.
City/State/ZIP: Toledo, OH 43615-7430
Phone: 419-936-2986
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Decatur Arts Festival
Address: P.O. Box 401
City/State/ZIP: Decatur, GA 30031
Phone:
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.decaturartsalliance.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Des Moines Arts Festival
Address: 700 Locust Street, Suite 100
City/State/ZIP: Des Moines, IA 50309
Phone: 515-286-4927
Fax: 515-286-4942
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.desmoinesartsfestival.org/
2006 Date: June 23-25
2007 Date:

East Lansing Art Festival
Address: 410 Abbott Road
City/State/ZIP: East Lansing, MI 48823
Phone: 517-319-6804
Fax: 517-337-1607
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.elartfest.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Edina Art Fair
Address: P.O Box 24122
City/State/ZIP: Edina, MN 55424-0122
Phone: 952-922-1524
Fax: 952-922-4413
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.50thandfrance.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Edmonds Art Festival
Address: PMB 125, 10927 Mukilteo Speedway
City/State/ZIP: Edmonds, WA 98275
Phone: 425-745-0799
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.edfest.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

emevents
Address: 417 E. 14th Ave.
City/State/ZIP: Naperville, IL 60563
Phone: 630-536-8416
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: emevents.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Experience Art in Memphis
Address: 3100 Walnut Grove, Suite 402
City/State/ZIP: Memphis, TN 38111
Phone: 901-761-1278
Fax: 901-761-4147
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.eaim.org/
2006 Date: June 16-18
2007 Date:

Fountain Square Art Festival
Address:
City/State/ZIP: Evanston, IL
Phone:
Fax:
Email:
Website: www.amdurproductions.com/evanston/index.html
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Frederick Festival Of The Arts
Address: 320 East Church Street
City/State/ZIP: Frederick, MD 21701
Phone: 301-694-9632
Fax: 301-682-7378
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.frederickarts.org/
2006 Date: June 3-4
2007 Date: June 2-3

Fun d’Art Sponsorship Development
Address: 3715 Lake Haughey Road
City/State/ZIP: Minneapolis, MN 55359-9725
Phone: 763-972-8908
Fax:
Email:
Website: art-alley-festivals.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Garage Sale Art Fair, The
Address: 11189 East CD Avenue
City/State/ZIP: Richland, MI 49083
Phone:
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: garagesaleartfair.com/
2006 Date: February 25
2007 Date:

Gasparilla Festival of the Arts
Address: P.O. Box 10591
City/State/ZIP: Tampa, FL 33679
Phone: 813-884-5511
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: gasparilla-arts.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Geneva Chamber of Commerce
Address: P.O. Box 481
City/State/ZIP: Geneva, IL 60134-0481
Phone: (630) 232-6060
Fax: (630) 232-6083
Email: [email protected]
Website: emevents.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

George Little Management
Address: 10 Bank St.
City/State/ZIP: White Plains, NY 10606
Phone: 914-421-3311
Fax:
Email:
Website: www.glmshows.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Germantown Friends School Craft Show
Address: 31 W. Coulter St.
City/State/ZIP: Philadelphia, PA 19144-2898
Phone: 215-951-2340
Fax: 215-951-2390
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Guilford Handcraft Center – EXPO 2005
Address: 411 Church Street
City/State/ZIP: Guilford, CT 06437
Phone: 203-453-5947, x11
Fax:
Email:
Website: www.handcraftcenter.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Gwinnett Council for the Arts
Address: 6400 Sugarloaf Parkway, #300
City/State/ZIP: Duluth, GA 30097
Phone: 770-623-6002
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.hudgenscenter.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Harvest Festivals
Address: 601 N. Mc Dowell Blvd.
City/State/ZIP: Petaluma, CA 94954-2312
Phone: 707-778-6300
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.harvestfestival.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Highland Park Festival of Fine Craft
Address: 1957 Sheridan Rd.
City/State/ZIP: Highland Park, IL 60035-2540
Phone: 847-432-1888
Fax: 847-432-9106
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.theartcenterhp.org
2006 Date: June 24-25
2007 Date: June 23-24

Integrity Shows-Ferndale Fine Art Show, Royal Oak Clay & Glass Show, FashionArt
Address: 2102 Roosevelt
City/State/ZIP: Ypsilanti, MI 48197
Phone: 734-216-3958
Fax: 734-482-2070
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date: Ferndale: Sept 16-17; Fashion Art: Nov 17-19
2007 Date:

Jubilee Cultural Alliance
Address: 2 Galleria Parkway
City/State/ZIP: Atlanta, GA 30339
Phone: 770 955-8000
Fax: 770 955-7719
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.cobbgalleria.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Kings Mountain Art Fair
Address:
City/State/ZIP: Woodside, CA
Phone:
Fax:
Email:
Website: www.kmaf.phc.net/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

KPFA Holiday Crafts Fair
Address: 1929 Martin Luther King Jr Way
City/State/ZIP: Berkeley, CA 94704
Phone: 510-848-6767 x 243
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.kpfa.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Krasl Art Fair on the Bluff
Address: 707 Lake Blvd.
City/State/ZIP: St. Joseph, MI 49085-1398
Phone: 269-983-0271
Fax: 269-983-0275
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.krasl.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

La Jolla Festival of the Arts
Address: 4130 La Jolla Village Dr Ste 10717
City/State/ZIP: La Jolla, CA 92037-1480
Phone: 858-456-1268
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.lajollaartfestival.org
2006 Date: June 24-25
2007 Date:

La Quinta Arts Foundation
Address: P.O. Box 777
City/State/ZIP: La Quinta, CA 92253
Phone: 760-564-1244
Fax: 760-564-6884
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.lqaf.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Labor Day Festival/Mammoth Lakes
Address: P.O. Box 56
City/State/ZIP: Mammoth Lakes, CA 93546
Phone: 760-873-7242
Fax: 760-873-7242
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.mammothartguild.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Lake Oswego Festival Of The Arts/Lakewood Center For The Arts
Address: 368 S. State Street
City/State/ZIP: Lake Oswego, OR 97034
Phone: 503-636-1060
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.lakewood-center.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Lakefront Festival Of Arts
Address: 700 N. Art Museum Drive
City/State/ZIP: Milwaukee, WI 53202
Phone: 414-224-3850
Fax: 414-271-7588
Email: [email protected]
Website: 207.67.48.111/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Lakeville Art Festival
Address: P.O. Box 835
City/State/ZIP: Lakeville, MN 55044
Phone: 952-435-8717
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.lakevilleartfestival.org
2006 Date: Sept 16-17
2007 Date: Sept 15-16

Las Vegas Fine Arts Festival
Address: 749 Veterans Memorial Dr.
City/State/ZIP: Las Vegas, NV 89147-1945
Phone:
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.ci.las-vegas.nv.us
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Leesburg Fine Art Festival
Address: 429 W. Magnolia Street
City/State/ZIP: Leesburg, FL 34748
Phone: 352-365-0232
Fax: 352-314-1152
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.leesburgartfestival.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date: March 3-4

Long’s Park Art & Crafts Festival
Address: P O Box 1553
City/State/ZIP: Lancaster, PA 17603-1553
Phone: 717-295-7054
Fax: 717-290-7123
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.longspark.org/
2006 Date: Sept 1-4
2007 Date: Aug 31-Sept 3

Lowell Arts Festival/Arts League Of Lowell
Address: P.O. Box 7134
City/State/ZIP: Lowell, MA 01852
Phone:
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.lowellartsfestival.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Madison Chautauqua Festival Of Art
Address: 601 W. First St.
City/State/ZIP: Madison, IN 47250
Phone: 812-265-6100
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.madisonchautauqua.com
2006 Date: Sept 29-30
2007 Date:

Madison On the Square
Address: 211 State St.
City/State/ZIP: Madison, WI 53703
Phone: 608-257-0158
Fax: 608-257-5722
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Magic City Art Connection – ONB
Address: 1128 Glen View Rd
City/State/ZIP: Birmingham, AL 35222-4315
Phone: 205-595-6306
Fax: 205-595-3563
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.magiccityart.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

MAIN ST. Fort Worth Arts Festival
Address: 777 Taylor Street, Suite 100
City/State/ZIP: Fort Worth, TX 76102
Phone: 817-336-2787
Fax: 817-335-3113
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.mainstreetartsfest.org/
2006 Date: April 20-23
2007 Date: April 19-22

Marion Arts Festival
Address: c/o The Marion Chamber of Commerce, 790-11th Street
City/State/ZIP: Marion, IA 52302
Phone: 319-377-6316
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.marionartsfestival.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Mayfest
Address: 3228 Camp Bowie Rd.
City/State/ZIP: Fort Worth, TX 76107
Phone: 817-332-1055
Fax: 817-332-1599
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.mayfest.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Metris Uptown Art Fair
Address: 1406 West Lake Street, Ste. 202
City/State/ZIP: Minneapolis, MN 55408
Phone: 612-823-4581
Fax: 612-823-3158
Email: [email protected]
Website: uptownminneapolis.com/artfair.html
2006 Date: August 4-6
2007 Date:

MLA Productions
Address: 1384 Weston Rd.
City/State/ZIP: Scotts Valley, CA 95066
Phone: 831-438-4751
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.mlaproductions.com/
2006 Date: Danville Fine Arts Faire, Danville, CA: June 24-25
Connoisseurs’ Marketplace, Menlo Park, CA: July 15-16
Palo Alto Festival of the Arts, Palo Alto, CA: Aug. 26-27
Pleasanton Heritage Festival, Pleasanton, CA: Sept. 23-24
Half Moon Bay Art-Pumpkin Festival, HMB, CA: Oct. 14-15
Danville Fall Crafts Festival, Danville, CA: Oct. 21-22
2007 Date:

Mount Gretna Outdoor Art Show
Address: PO Box 637
City/State/ZIP: Mount Gretna, PA 17064-0637
Phone: 717-964-3270
Fax: 717-964-3054
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.mtgretnaarts.com
2006 Date: Aug. 19-20
2007 Date:

Mountain Artists Rendezvous
Address: P.O. Box 1248
City/State/ZIP: Jackson Hole, WY 83001-1248
Phone: 307-733-8792
Fax: 307-739-8907
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.artassociation.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Museum Art on the Boulevard
Address: 2840 NE 35th Court
City/State/ZIP: Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33308
Phone: 954-561-2827
Fax: 954-561-2827
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Mystic Outdoor Art Festival
Address: P.O. Box 300
City/State/ZIP: Mystic, CT 06355-0300
Phone: 860-572-9578
Fax: 860-572-9273
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Naples National Art Festival
Address: PO Box 839
City/State/ZIP: Naples, FL 34106
Phone: 239-513-2492
Fax: 239-262-5404
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.naplesartcenter.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

New Orleans Fresh Art Festival – Arts Council of New Orleans
Address: 225 Baronne Street Ste. 1712
City/State/ZIP: New Orleans, LA 70112
Phone: 504-523-1465
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.artscouncilofneworleans.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival
Address: 1205 N. Rampart Street
City/State/ZIP: New Orleans, LA 70116
Phone: 504-522-4786
Fax: 504-558-6121
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.nojazzfest.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival – Greater Reston Arts Center
Address: 12001 Market St., Suite 103
City/State/ZIP: Reston, VA 20190-5668
Phone: 703-471-9242
Fax: 703-471-0952
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.restonarts.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Oconomowoc Festival of the Arts
Address: P.O. Box 651
City/State/ZIP: Oconomowoc, WI 53066-0651
Phone: 414-567-1243
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.oconomowocarts.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Oh! Originals Show and Sale
Address: 212 S. Bemiston
City/State/ZIP: Clayton, MO 63105-1904
Phone: 314-721-6222
Fax: 314-721-6212
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.ohoriginals.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Oklahoma City Festival of the Arts
Address: 400 W Califonia St.
City/State/ZIP: Oklahoma City, OK 73102-5021
Phone: 405-270-4848
Fax: 405-270-4888
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.artscouncilokc.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date: April 24-29

Omaha Summer Arts Festival
Address: P.O. Box 31134
City/State/ZIP: Omaha, NE 68131-0134
Phone: 402-345-5401
Fax: 402-342-4114
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.summerarts.org
2006 Date: June 23-25
2007 Date:

Orchard Lake Fine Art Show/Hotworks, LLC
Address: zP.O. Box 79
City/State/ZIP: Milford, MI 48381-0079
Phone: 248-684-2613
Fax: 248-684-0195
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.hotworks.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Outdoor Arts Festival Of The Bruce Museum
Address: 1 Museum Dr.
City/State/ZIP: Greenwich, CT 06830-7100
Phone: 203-869-0376 Ext. 336
Fax: 203-869-0963
Email:
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Paradise City Arts Festival
Address: 30 Industrial Dr E
City/State/ZIP: Northampton, MA Northampton
Phone: 800-511-9725
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.paradisecityarts.com/
2006 Date: NA
2007 Date: 3/16-3/18 in Marlborough, MA
3/30-4/1 in Philadelphia, PA
5/26-5/29 in Northampton, MA
Applications for the following shows will be mailed and available online 2/1/07:
10/6-10/8 in Northampton, MA
11/16-11/18 in Marlborough, MA

Park City Art Festival
Address:
City/State/ZIP: Park City, UT
Phone:
Fax:
Email:
Website: www.kimball-art.org/artfest.htm
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Peoples’ Art Fair
Address: 1490 Lafayette, #104
City/State/ZIP: Denver, CO 80218
Phone: 303-830-1651
Fax: 303-830-1782
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.chundenver.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Peoria Art Guild Fine Art Fair
Address: 203 Harrison St.
City/State/ZIP: Peoria, IL 61602-1536
Phone: 309-637-2787
Fax: 309-637-7334
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.peoriaartguild.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Philadelphia Crafts Show
Address: P.O. Box 7646
City/State/ZIP: Philadelphia, PA 19101-7646
Phone:
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.libertynet.org/~pmacraft
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Philadelphia Furniture & Furnishings Show
Address: 162 North Third Street
City/State/ZIP: Philadelphia, PA 19106
Phone: 215-440-0718
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Pimsleur & Co, Inc
Address: 414 Mason St, Ste 704
City/State/ZIP: San Francisco, CA 94102
Phone: 415-249-4640
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Plaza Art Fair
Address: 310 Ward Parkway
City/State/ZIP: Kansas City, MO 64112-2110
Phone: 816-960-6234
Fax: 816-960-6215
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.countryclubplaza.com/artfair.html
2006 Date: Sept. 22 – 24
2007 Date:

Port Warwick Art & Sculpture Festival
Address: P.O. Box 120648
City/State/ZIP: Newport News, VA 23612-0648
Phone: 757-369-3014
Fax: 757-369-3010
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.pwartfest.org
2006 Date: Oct 14-15
2007 Date:

Powers’ Crossroads Country Fair And Art Festival
Address: 4766 W. Highway 34
City/State/ZIP: Newnan, GA 30264-0899
Phone: 770-253-2011
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Providence Craft Show
Address: Po Box 6071
City/State/ZIP: Providence, RI 02940
Phone: 401-274-7722
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.ProvidenceCraftShow.com/
2006 Date: October 20-22
2007 Date:

Red River Revel Art Festival
Address: 101 Crockett Street
City/State/ZIP: Shreveport, LA 71101
Phone: 318-424-4000
Fax: 318-226-9559
Email: [email protected]
Website: redriverrevel.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Rest Of The Best Fest
Address: 1916 Pike Place, Suite 146
City/State/ZIP: Seattle, WA 98101
Phone: 206-363-2048
Fax:
Email:
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

River East Art Center
Address: 435 East Illinois St.
City/State/ZIP: Chicago, IL 60611
Phone: 312-321-1001
Fax: 312-836-5983
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.rivereastartcenter.com
2006 Date: NA
2007 Date: NA

Riverside Arts Festival
Address: 1402 Edgewood Avenue South
City/State/ZIP: Jacksonville, Fl 32205
Phone: 904-813-1263
Fax: 904-388-5566
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Riverwalk Fine Art Fair
Address: 508 North Center Street
City/State/ZIP: Naperville, IL 60563
Phone: 630-355-2530
Fax: 630-355-3071
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date: Sept. 16-17
2007 Date:

Rosen Group-Buyers Markets of American Craft/AmericanStyle Magazine
Address: 3000 Chestnut Ave. Suite 300
City/State/ZIP: Baltimore, MD 21211
Phone: 410-889-2933
Fax: 410-243-7089
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.AmericanCraft.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Santa Fe Community College Spring Arts Festival
Address: 3000 NW 83rd Street
City/State/ZIP: Gainesville, FL 32606-1451
Phone: 352-395-5355
Fax: 352-336-2715
Email: [email protected]
Website: inst.sfcc.edu/~springarts/
2006 Date: April 1-2
2007 Date:

Saratoga Rotary Art Show
Address: 12560 Easton Drive
City/State/ZIP: Saratoga, CA 95070
Phone: 408-252-3922
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.saratogarotary.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Scottsdale Arts Festival
Address: 7380 E. Second St.
City/State/ZIP: Scottsdale, AZ 85251-5604
Phone: 480-874-4652
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.scottsdalearts.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Sedona Arts Festival
Address: P.O. Box 2729
City/State/ZIP: Sedona, AZ 86339-2729
Phone: 928-204-9456
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.sedonaartsfestival.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Shadyside Summer Arts Festival
Address: P O Box 10139
City/State/ZIP: Pittsburgh, PA 15232-0139
Phone: 412-681-2809
Fax: 412-681-1226
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.shadysidearts.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Shelburne Museum/ Southern Vermont/ Lake Placid/ Saratoga/ Hildene Foliage/ Stowe Foliage Art & Craft Festivals
Address: PO Box 300
City/State/ZIP: Charlotte, VT 05445
Phone: 802-425-3399
Fax: 802-425-3711
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.craftproducers.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Smithsonian Craft Show
Address: PO Box 37012
Smithsonian Institution, Room 436, MRC 037
City/State/ZIP: Washington, DC 20013-7012
Phone: 202-357-4000
Fax: 202-786-2516
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.smithsoniancraftshow.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date: April 19-22

Smoky Hill River Festival – Fine Art/Fine Craft Show
Address: P.O. Box 2181
City/State/ZIP: Salina, KS 67402-2181
Phone: 785-309-5770
Fax: 785-826-7444
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.riverfestival.com/
2006 Date: June 10-11
2007 Date:

South Shore Frolics Festival Of Arts
Address: P.O. Box 070137
City/State/ZIP: Milwaukee, WI 53207-0137
Phone: 414-482-1543
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.bayviewarts.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Springdale Fine Art Fair
Address: 469 Maple Circle Drive
City/State/ZIP: Cincinnati, OH 45246
Phone: 513-671-1774
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Springfield Old Capitol Art Fair.
Address: 1551 W. Cook St.
City/State/ZIP: Springfield, IL 62704
Phone: 217-529-2600
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

St. James Court Art Show
Address: P.O. Box 3804
City/State/ZIP: Louisville, KY 40201
Phone: 502-635-1842
Fax: 502-635-1296
Email: [email protected]
Website: stjamescourtartshow.com/
2006 Date: Oct 7-9
2007 Date:

St. Stephens Art and Craft Show
Address: 2750 McFarlane Road
City/State/ZIP: Coconut Grove, FL 33133
Phone: 305-558-1758
Fax: 305-448-2153
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.floridastuff.com/ststephensart/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Stone Arch Festival Of The Arts
Address: St. Anthony’s Main, 219 Main St. SE Suite 304
City/State/ZIP: Minneapolis , MN 55414
Phone: 612-378-1226
Fax: 612-378-3102
Email:
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Suburban Fine Arts Center Festival Of Fine Craft
Address: 1957 Sheridan Rd
City/State/ZIP: Highland Park, IL 60035-2540
Phone: 847-432-1888
Fax: 847-432-9106
Email:
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Summerfair Cincinnati
Address: P.O. Box 8277
City/State/ZIP: Cincinnati, OH 45208-0277
Phone: 513-531-0050
Fax: 513-731-0280
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.summerfair.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Sun Valley Arts & Crafts Festival
Address: P O Box 656
City/State/ZIP: Sun Valley, ID 83353-0656
Phone: 208-726-9491 Ext. 17
Fax: 208-726-2344
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.sunvalleycenter.org/
2006 Date: Aug. 11-13
2007 Date: Aug. 10-12

SunFest of Palm Beach County
Address: 525 Clematis Street
City/State/ZIP: West Palm Beach, FL 33401
Phone: 561-659-5980
Fax: 561-659-3567
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.sunfest.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Syracuse Arts & Crafts Festival-c/o Downtown Committee of Syracuse
Address: 109 South Warren St. #1900
City/State/ZIP: Syracuse, NY 13202
Phone: 315-422-8284
Fax: 315-471-4503
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.syracuseartsandcraftsfestival.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

TACA Craft Fair – Tennesee Assoc. of Craft Artists
Address: P.O. Box 120066
City/State/ZIP: Nashville, TN 37212-0066
Phone: 615-385-1094
Fax: 615-385-1909
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.tennesseecrafts.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Tempe Festival of the Arts
Address: 660 S. Mill Ave, Suite 150
City/State/ZIP: Tempe, AZ 85281-3696
Phone: 480-921-2300
Fax: 480-968-7882
Email: [email protected]
Website: tempefestivalofthearts.com/
2006 Date: Dec. 1-3
2007 Date:

Three Rivers Arts Festival
Address: 707 Penn Ave.
City/State/ZIP: Pittsburgh, PA 15222-3401
Phone: (412) 281-8723 ext 26
Fax: (412) 281-8722
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.artsfestival.net
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Three Rivers Festival
Address: 102 Three Rivers N.
City/State/ZIP: Ft. Wayne, IN 46802-1312
Phone: 219-745-5556
Fax: 219-744-1453
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.trfonline.org/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Tupelo Gumtree Festival – Gumtree Museum of Art
Address: P O Box 786
City/State/ZIP: Tupelo, MS 38802-0786
Phone: 662-844-2787
Fax: 662-844-2787
Email: [email protected]
Website: gumtreemuseumofart.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Two Rivers Art Expo
Address: 500 E Locust, Suite 201
City/State/ZIP: Des Moines, IA 50309-1908
Phone:
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.metroarts.org
2006 Date: November 11-12
2007 Date:

Upper Arlington Labor Day Arts Festival
Address: 3600 Tremont Rd.
City/State/ZIP: Upper Arlington, OH 43221
Phone: 614-583-5310
Fax: 614-442-3208
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.ua-ohio.net/artsfestival/
2006 Date: Sept. 4
2007 Date: Sept. 3

Utah Arts Festival
Address: 331 W. Pierpoint Ave
City/State/ZIP: Salt Lake City, UT 84101
Phone: 801-322-2428
Fax: 801-363-8681
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.uaf.org/
2006 Date: June 22-25
2007 Date:

Village Place Fine Art Village/Best of Art and Craft
Address: 14811 Landmark Drive
City/State/ZIP: Louisville, KY 40245
Phone: 502-244-1030
Fax:
Email:
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Virginia Festival of the Arts/Celebrate Fairfax
Address: 12000 Government Center Pkwy, Suite 247
City/State/ZIP: Fairfax, VA 22035-0089
Phone: 703-324-5315
Fax: 703-222-9784
Email: [email protected]
Website: celebratefairfax.com
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Weems Artfest
Address: 2801 M Eubank NE
City/State/ZIP: Albuquerque, NM 87112-1316
Phone: 505-293-6133
Fax: 505-294-6494
Email:
Website:
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Westchester & Washington Crafts Shows – Crafts America
Address: P.O. Box 603
City/State/ZIP: Greens Farms, CT 06436
Phone: 203-254-0486
Fax: 203-254-9672
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.craftsamericashows.com/
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival
Address: P.O. Box 597
City/State/ZIP: Winter Park, FL 32790-0597
Phone: 407-672-6390
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.wpsaf.org
2006 Date:
2007 Date:

Wyandotte Street Art Fair
Address: 3131 Biddle Ave.
City/State/ZIP: Wyandotte, MI 48192-4937
Phone: 734-324-4506
Fax: 734-324-4552
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.wyandotte.net/
2006 Date: July 12-15
2007 Date:

Memorial to Thomas R. Dawkins

A few weeks ago painter, Tom Dawson, died from cancer in Fort Lauderdale. Tom was one of the original art fair artists and could be found at the top art fairs around the country year round for years. He had sold his home in Michigan a couple of years ago and lived in Fort Lauderdale where he had a lovely home and gardened. He had a great orchid collection that was the envy of all of us. Tom was a great neighbor at an art fair and was well known throughout our community. His friendly smile and unassuming manner will be missed.

– Barbara Krupp, March 2007


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

Memorial to Michael Mick

Dear Michael died of cancer in 2002. We miss his wonderful smile and great ceramics.

Sally J. Bright


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

Memorial to Carol Sedstrom Ross

Carol Sedestrom Ross, died unexpectedly of a heart attack on Monday, June 14 in Houston, Texas.

Carol was THE mover and shaker in the craft field. Anytime she took something on, that “something” happened. Whether it was an economic survey of the impact of craft on our economy or starting an art school in Mexico, those of us who had her involved in a project were truly fortunate to have her energy, commitment, intelligence, and fearlessness. Carol was a towering figure in the contemporary American Craft movement. Over the last 30 years, beginning with her tenure at the American Crafts Council, she advocated for artists and developed markets for craft work that put bread on the tables of thousands of artisans.

In 1985, Carol decided that there was a clear need to institutionalize the passing of the hat she witnessed at almost every show to help exhibiting craft artists who were dealing with emergencies in their lives. She recognized that too often this gesture was the only safety-net that self-employed artists had. By creating the Craft Emergency Relief Fund, she ensured that craft artists would always have funds and other help to count on when their careers were threatened with events such as fire, theft, natural disaster, accident, and illness. Twenty-five years later, CERF+ has helped hundreds of artists with over $1 million in grants, loans, and other services.

Carol and her husband Adrian Ross, were trying to make a tight connecting flight in Houston returning to Mexico when Carol suffered a massive coronary attack and died.

— Martha Giberson


There is a memorial to Carol on the CODA website at:

http://www.codacraft.org/dnn/

(The above photo is from the same web page.)


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

Memorial to Michael Craven

Hello! May I offer my sympathy to friend and family of Michael Craven. I met Michael in 2005 on Ebay. We were both looking for a Blue Pearl Ludwig drum set. He got his and I’m still looking. This is where I got interested in his photography and art form. We exchanged a number of emails over a few months then we lost touch. Today, I got an email from a friend and thought I’d send Michael a copy. And then, looking for him on the net, I found the unthinkable – he had passed away. Please pass this on to his family. Who know maybe some of these were his creations.

Regards, Jean from Canada

(note from Sally, Jean included images referred to in her last sentence.)


At an art show I recently participated in I was informed that Michael Craven, a talented photographer, had died in June from cancer. I was asked to pass this information on to other photographers. I knew Michael only through our contact at many art shows throughout the country. I enjoyed seeing his large and very intriguing photographs and also enjoyed his sense of humor.

Michael always wore black clothing, no matter the temperature. I have a clear recollection of talking to him at Pensacola, one very hot and sunny day. He was sweating profusely and unhappy about working in the heat. I asked him why he wore black clothing in such hot weather. He told me that one time, years ago, he did a photo shoot for a client. After the day’s shoot he had the film developed. In every good image he had taken his light clothing was visible reflected in the glass or metal which was part of what he was assigned to photograph. He had taken no polaroids, so had no previews of the results. This story took place in the olden days, before digital. Ever since this unfortunate shoot he wore black.
– Robert Barab


Michael Craven, a 30 years+ photography veteran, died in June after a long illness. Michael was a great guy and his fine work was an asset to the art fair business. He really knew his way around a camera and a darkroom. He was a photojournalist and commercial photographer before he started exhibiting at art fairs. The integrity of his images made his work stand above many of his contemporaries.

The work was original in concept and always great to see. No cookie cutter images here, just great conceptual pieces photographed and printed in the traditional manner.

Here is his website: http://brainfoodphoto.com/ and here is another site I found that has more of his imagery: http://www.absolutearts.com/portfolios/a/artychoke/

– Connie Mettler of ArtFairCalendar.com


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

Good Mechanics List

CALIFORNIA
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
  • R.C. Imports (Daniel Santos, Prop.)
    El Cerrito
    6501 Fairmount Ave
    510-526-8084
  • Lextech Automotive
    Holiday
    4055 Louis Avenue
    727-942-2733
  • Pep Boys
    Jacksonville
  • Sorenson Chevrolet
    Lake Wales
    Hwy 27
    863-676-7671
  • Kramer’s Auto Electric and AC (Frank or Frank Jr.)
    Plantation
    954-583-4998
    954-792-6686
  • Quality Auto Service, Inc
    Tampa
    4103 W. Alva
    813-876-1551
  • Sanibel ServiceCenters (Mobil)
    Sanibel Island
    Periwinkle Way
    941-472-1878
    941-472-2125
  • Roswell Auto (Carl or Robert)
    Atlanta
    770-992-1962
    770-992-1963
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
  • Michael’s Automotive
    Boise
    22 N. 8th St. (North of downtown)
    208-344-4114
  • Brown & Hart Automotive Enterprises
    Champaign
    320 Water
    217-356-7440
  • Gene Pace
    Gilberts
    Just north of Elgin
    847-428-6300
  • O’Briens Automotive Service Center
    Rockford
    629 Elm St
    968-0302
  • Master Tech Auto Service Bloomington
    1927 S. Curry Pike
    812-330-0364
  • O’Brien’s Battery and Expert Auto Service
    Michigan City
    219-872-7878
KANSAS
MAINE
MICHIGAN
  • Slimmer’s Automotive
    Lawrence
    2030 E. 23rd (Hwy 10 East edge of town)
    785-843-5606
  • Bob’s Import Car Care
    Lawrence
    640 N 2nd (South of the East Lawrence exit of I-70)
    785-841-5099
  • Dale & Ron’s
    Lawrence
    630 Connecticut (East edge of downtown)
    785-843-5200
  • Jim’s Service Center
    Kennebunk
    Summer Street
    207-985-4862
  • Professional Automotive Technicians (Mike Bittenbinder)
    Ann Arbor
    1225 Jewett
    734-665-9707
  • Illi’s Auto Service (Ray)
    Ann Arbor
    401 W. Huron
    734-665-5011
  • Imperial Auto Service
    Ann Arbor
    2344 Dexter Road (just east of Maple Rd.)
    734-761-3888
  • Alan Ford
    Bloomfield Hills
    on Telegraph
  • Cole-Story Ford (Barry)
    Coldwater
    Just off I-69
    517-278-5661
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEW YORK
  • Del’s Auto Service
    Kansas City
    8016 Paseo
    816-333-2854
  • Waldo Imports
    Kansas City
    7222 Wornall
    816-361-6609
  • Big Bear Roadside Service
    Dillon
  • East Neck Auto Service Inc.
    Babylon
    295 Little E. Neck Road
    631-321-7434
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
  • Curtis Hi Tech
    Asheville
    1225 Tunnel Rd
    631-321-7434
  • Mostly Toyotas
    Asheville
    253 Biltmore Ave.
    828-253-4981
  • AAA Tire and Auto Center (Frank)
    Boone
    744 Hwy.105 Extension
    828-264-8473
  • JB Brown’s Auto Repair
    Candler (outside Asheville)
    1105 Smokey Park Highway
    828-670-1100

  • J.M. Peters
    Near Fayetteville
    2046 Owen Drive
    1-800-352-7415
    910-678-2020
    910-484-2101
  • OK Tire (Chris)
    Fargo
    2224 Main Avenue
    701- 237-6525
  • The Lusty Wrench
    Cleveland Heights
    2120 Lee Road
    216-371-8150
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
VIRGINIAÊ
  • Jackson’s Complete Auto Care
    Eugene
    660 W. 6th Ave.
    541-344-7366
    800-258-7344
  • Obie’s Import Repair
    Pendleton
    1114 S.W. Frazer
    541-276-2061
  • Palm Auto (Joe Sullivan)
    Philadelphia
    Blair and E. Norris Sts.
  • Earlysville Auto
    Charlottesville
    Route 743, also called Earlysville Road
  • Jon’s Import Auto Service
    Lexington
    707 S. Main St.
    540-463-3711

Memorial to Roy Schallenberg

Roy’s website is: http://SchallenbergStudio.com


Roy Schallenberg’s laughter, stories, vibrant art work, guidance and powerful presence since 1976 will be greatly missed at Art Shows across the country. Roy’s artistic ability was evident as a child, but became a passion and career as a young man in South Africa. Roy was an engineer by education and training but instead he played bass guitar for a band that became well known in South Africa. The band worked for Saully Kirsner, also known for the Atlantis in the Bahamas, by playing in his four luxury beach hotels in Durban. Roy met an artist during that time and began selling his paintings at the Kirsner Hotels and soon discovered that the paintings he created were in a higher demand. Soon his paintings were being purchased by a gallery in Israel. Roy’s art career led him to Australia where he lived and painted for 3 years. A television documentary was done on him and his paintings. Soon after Roy was asked to teach painting to the passengers on the “Love Boat”, which was shooting scenes for the new sitcom at sea and taking passengers from Australia to the United States. Roy made the United States his home. He lived most of his life in Florida and in his beloved Charlevoix, Michigan.

Roy traveled the United States and Canada creating and selling his paintings with many promoters, galleries and organizations. Roy created relationships as well as paintings with his many collectors over the years. He had many famous and well known collectors, but to Roy they all were important . Roy donated often to non-profits and causes to help raise money and awareness. He loved helping others become successful and shared his knowledge and experience freely. He was a mentor and friend to any artist or promoter, especially new, who needed a moral boost, idea, assistance or guidance. He was also open to learning and growing as an artist and person and often sought out the wisdom and advice of others. Roy was involved with helping many promoters over the years, served on several juries and judged various shows, but he was especially proud of his association with Hotworks and Patty Narozny. There will be an award in Roy Schallenberg’s name given at the Hotwork’s Orchard Lake Show.

Roy led a life as vibrant, bold and intuitive as his paintings. He loved his life, his friends, his family, golf and scotch. He was happiest in his studio, on the golf course and spending time with his wife and friends. Roy felt fortunate, loved and overwhelmed with all the visits, calls, cards and generous shows of support. April 3rd a Celebration of Roy’s life was held at his home in Merritt Island. His memory and legacy will live on in his artwork, his friends and family who will love and cherish him forever. Roy’s wife, Andrea, son, Mathew and daughter, Danielle want to thank each and every person who shared Roy’s journey with him and invites you to share your stories with us at [email protected]

Love and gratitude, Andrea, Mathew and Danielle


Artist Roy Shallenberg passed away March 24th at 8:30 am. Artist Elaine Lanoue posted this to Facebook this morning. He had been diagnosed with terminal cancer but people were amazed by his positive attitude and his desire to continue to paint and live his life as normally as possible until the end. His friendly spirit will be missed.
Patricia Hecker


Yes, Roy was a really positive and friendly addition to the art fair world. He was one of those artists who always asked for a prominent corner in the show (he hadn’t been with ABE for a long time, but I used to see him at the Orchard Lake Show with Patty Narozny, and I know he helped her tremendously with her show. I always found him to be kind, polite and interesting. It’s hard to see our peers go.
Lisa Konikow, of the “Arts, Beats and Eats” show in Michigan


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

Memorial to Janet Long

Just wanted everyone to know that Janet Long passed away Saturday. A wonderful woman who fought a long, hard battle, she will be missed by everyone who knew her. Please keep John in your thoughts and prayers.

Bonnie Blandford


I did not know Janet. I know John, only slightly, though our encounters seem to weave a friendship that keeps building with each visit.

I knew Janet via John and saw her at several shows throughout the years, never knowing anything about her or her illness. I was informed of this during the Ann Arbor National show which was a few weeks ago.
Her presence was missed and John was obviously in deep thought about her welfare.

Sometimes I forget all of the gifts that I have been blessed with and it is at these times when I realize how fortunate I/we all are. I missed out on getting to know Janet for any number of reasons, but the point being, all we really have is each moment and the opportunity to seize upon them and bring some sort of spirit and challenge to those moments. I am saddened by the death of someone that is part of this big family and I missed knowing a sister….
May her spirit shine.
May John have strength to find answers that chart a bright path.

Mark Wallis


The last time I saw Janet, I think it was in Denver this summer, we hugged and I said I was always so glad to see her, to which she responded “Yep! I’m still around!”

She was always so positive and thoughtful. Marvin and Janet had several long talks about being truly alive and grateful every day. Her strength and her humor will always be an inspiration.

Wendy Hill


Janet was a beautiful person and I still hear her laughing!
I admired her strength in dealing with her daily battles with courage and humor.
I will miss her.
Jon will be in our prayers as this season of Thanksgiving approaches.

Patricia Hecker


We are all so sad. Janet brought us grace and beauty in her work — courage and humor in her life. There could not have been a soul who didn’t love and admire her.
There will be a gathering of friends and family on Tuesday, the 19th from 5 until 8pm at Richeson-Wickham-Atkins Funeral Home, 216 South Springfield Street in St.Paris, Ohio 937-663-4193
There will be a burial on Wednesday the 20th, originating at the funeral home at 11am.

St.Paris is east of Piqua, Ohio, a few miles east of I-75, north of Dayton, OH.

Eugenie Torgersen


Janet was such a kind, kind person! Gracious, friendly and always smiling. For years I never knew she had cancer, until I commented on her ‘new’ hairdo one day. She laughed and said it was a wig, & that she had battled cancer for years. She put her whole soul into that beautiful jewelry.

Sally J. Bright


As a breast cancer survivor I was very upset to hear of her death. Perhaps the legacy that she could leave to us, in addition to her work, is a reminder to be pro-active in the early detection and prevention of the disease. My cancer was found only through a mammogram. Please get yearly mammograms or remind your partner to do so. Whenever I spoke to Janet, she seemed so peaceful in her acceptance of this tragic disease. It demonstrates the wonderful person that she was.

Linda Steinworth


I am deeply saddened by this news. Janet was a wonderful gracious, courageous person who showed such great heart in her battle with cancer. My heart felt sympathy goes out to John and the rest of her family and friends. This is a such a great loss to all of us who knew her or her work. She was a very talented and inspired artist. She will be missed and remembered fondly. Farewell.

Edward J. Avila


Janet affected my life very much, from her positive attitude and sense of humor to her courage. I will cherish aways the wonderful work that I have from her. Bill and I will think of John often during this difficult time; There is no doubt as to how much they loved each other.

LaTrece Coombs


In an amazing coincidence…..

Barbara Browning, my former wife passed away last friday also after a long battle with lung cancer.
She and I worked together on a body of work and did shows for many years. She and Janet were friends.
One can hope that their timely passing might be of comfort to each other.
Both these women touched many lives with their souls and their work.
Richard Kooyman


Friends in life and death.
Blessings to all who knew both these creative, loving souls.
Our lives are made richer for having known them.
Peace to their families.

Pat Hecker


Memorials posted here on the NAIA site and Member Forum.

BOOTH FEE REFUND POLICY STUDY

By Cynthia Davis
March 2000

Purpose:

The purpose of this study was to analyze art shows policy regarding booth fees. Shows were divided into one of three categories: shows where booth fees are due upon acceptance, shows that have some kind of refund policy, and shows with a policy that an application is a commitment to show. I was looking for any trends that seemed pertinent. It is not a definitive study and is only a sampling.

Criteria:

I took the top ranked 50 shows listed in the 1999 edition of ArtFair SourceBook, by Greg Lawler. I then added 25 other shows chosen at random from applications and the ArtFair SourceBook to equal a total of 75 shows in the study.

Statistical Summary:

Of the top 50 ranked shows:

  • 20 had booth fees due upon acceptance (40%)
  • 15 had some type of refund policy (30%)
  • 6 had both policies i.e. booth fee was not due until acceptance and there was also a time after than in which the artist may cancel and receive a refund (12%)
  • 14 had a commitment to show policy (8%)

Of the total 75 shows analyzed:

  • 35 had booth fees due upon acceptance (46.6%)
  • 19 had refund policies (25.5%)
  • 9 had both policies, i.e. booth fee was not due until acceptance and there was also a time after that in which the artist may cancel and receive a refund. (12%)
  • 14 had a commitment to show policy (18.6%)

Summery/Analysis:

Of the shows analyzed there appears to be a trend toward shows asking for the booth fee after acceptance (40% of the top 50 shows and 46.6% of the total sample). 30% of the top 50 shows have a booth refund policy and 12% of the top 50 were very generous and did both. The shows that had a commitment to show were all in the top 50 shows, but was still less than 33% and when the total group is considered, it drops to 20%. That means of the total sample, 80% of the shows are committed to working with the artists on the booth fee issue. And 12% were generous enough to allow both policies!

Of the shows that allow artists to send in booth fees after being accepted, 32% allowed 4 weeks for this to happen and 23% allowed 3 weeks. Then they had 11 weeks until the show itself. It is obvious that many respectable shows do not find it a hardship in terms of funds nor time to accomplish the task of offering artists an equitable booth fee policy.

Of the top 50 shows in the country, 70% offer artists an equitable policy and 72% in the total sampling! Yet the 14 shows that have a commitment to show policy are all in the top 50.

THE 8TH ANNUAL NAIA DIRECTORS CONFERENCE 2007

Wednesday & Thursday, August 29 & 30, 2007
(with pre-conference social gathering on Tuesday evening)

Eden Resort Inn & Suites
Lancaster, PA (preceding the Long?s Park Art and Craft Festival)

The 8th Art Festival Directors Conference, organized by the National Association of Independent Artists (NAIA) will be held Wednesday & Thursday, August 29 -30, 2007 in Lancaster, PA, immediately prior to the Long?s Park Art & Craft Festival. This unique event, produced by artists for show directors, is the only one of its kind that is geared directly to the needs and issues of arts festivals, and provides an unparalleled opportunity to meet, network, problem solve and energize with show directors from around the country. It is open to all show directors, staff and board members. If you?ve never been to an NAIA Directors Conference, you owe it to yourself to be there. And if you?ve attended one or all of our past conferences, you?ll find this one is targeted to provide as much valuable information to the ?veteran? director, as it is to those who may join us for the first time.

Featured Presenters 

Bruce Erley, Creative Strategies Group

Bruce Erley is a well-respected professional in the field of event sponsorship and marketing, and an engaging presenter. Bruce will be doing both a presentation and a workshop on sponsorship for arts festivals.

A Focus on the Art Show Sponsor: Strategies and Tactics for Success

In this plenary session, Bruce Erley, President and CEO of Creative Strategies Group, will reveal the strategies and tactics behind his sponsorship agency?s success in increasing the sponsorship revenue for the award-winning Cherry Creek Arts Festival by 300% in just five years. He?ll present a fresh perspective of looking at corporate partners, some of the common myths and mistakes many festival producers make in finding sponsors, pitfalls to avoid, as well as who is sponsoring arts festivals and why.

Selling Sponsorship

What do you need know what to do before you make the pitch to a potential sponsor that will significantly improve your chances for success? This workshop will provide you with the nuts & bolts of conducting an ?inventory? of your event?s sponsorable assets, designing and pricing compelling sponsor packages and preparing professional proposals. Detailed seminar outlines will be provided and many examples will be used in this informative, but upbeat presentation.

Anthony Radich and Beth Bank, Western States Arts Federation (WESTAF)

The Future of Technology as it Impacts the Art Show

Beyond digital images and online application systems for art shows, where will technology lead art shows in the next 5 ? 10 years? How might new technologies change the look of your art show, how you do business, and how you might present art to the public? How might developing technologies change the ways people think about or use art, and what might that mean to you? In this presentation, Anthony & Beth will give you some insights into the future of art and technology so that you can begin to prepare for and shape the effects it may offer to your show.

Also?.

The Cost of Shows: Understanding Perspectives / Finding Answers

You know your show is expensive to put on, but how do your costs compare with other shows? costs? And what effect are artists? costs to participate in your show having on your show? In this presentation, we look at the costs for shows to put on their events, the costs for artists to participate in shows, and explore answers to control costs and find success for both.

The Mystique of the Jury: What is Really Happening Behind the Scenes

All shows conduct juries to pick artists for their events, but are you really making the best use of the jury process to choose your exhibitors? Learn how shows may be sabotaging themselves through jury practices, and the effects that it may have on your show, the artists and your public.

Trends Among Artists: The Changing Artistic Landscape

The NAIA will present findings from its extensive survey taken over the spring and summer of 2007 to identify trends among the artists that are applying to art shows, and what this will mean to the future of your show.

Stopping the Importers, the Buy & Sell, and the Dishonesty

You know they are out there and getting into shows. What techniques can you use to spot them, catch them and remove them swiftly from your show? Better yet, can you catch them during the application process before they slip into show in the first place?

Returning Creativity to Art Shows: Letting The Art Rule

Are art shows becoming too much alike? Are the rules and procedures that have developed over time stifling artistic creativity? Are there ways to ?freshen up? your shows using the talents of those you seek in the first place ? the artists ? that might bend the procedures just enough to make you, your artists and your patrons breathe a collective ?Ahhhh?..? ? Join in this discussion and think about some bold new steps.

Art Marketing Initiatives ? Pennsylvania Style

The Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and Pennsylvania?s Cultural and Heritage Tourism Office are working together to make Pennsylvania a more festival and artist friendly state. They are collaborating with arts presenters and artists on marketing Pennsylvania?s festivals and in creating artists? and artisans? trails on some of the Commonwealth?s historic secondary highways. Learn more about these initiatives, and stimulate ideas for your own communities.

And more?.

More targeted presentations, lots of discussion and invaluable networking with your fellow show directors. If you can go to only one conference this year, this needs to be the one!

Click Here for the complete agenda.

Silent Auction of Original Art

This year, we will bring back our popular silent auction of original art to the conference. Bring your checkbook (or we gladly accept credit cards), and add to your personal art collection while you help to support NAIA

PLEASE BOOK YOUR HOTEL ROOMS NOW

Reservations must by made by July 29 to receive the special room rate. Reservations made after that date are subject to the Eden’s regular room prices.

Even if you aren?t yet certain that you will attend the conference, please book your hotel room anyway. We have a limited number of hotel rooms set aside at a special rate of $102.95/night ($139.95 for Friday night), and when they are gone, remaining rooms will only be available at a higher rate. Your room may be cancelled if you are unable to attend. See the hotel?s web site for cancellation policies.

To book your hotel room online, go to edenresort.com. Click on ?Reserve Now?, and then click on ?Group Reservations? and enter the NAIA Group #323879. Alternatively, you may call 717-569-6444; specify the NAIA Group #323879.

Deluxe rooms and suites are available at additional cost. This provides an added option to share a room with your fellow directors and split costs. Deluxe rooms or suites must be reserved by telephone and it is necessary to include the NAIA Group # with your reservation.

We hope you will make your reservations directly through the Eden Resort. Doing so will help to keep the price of rooms lower for all and alternatively allow NAIA to lessen the conference registration fee.

Transportation to Lancaster

For information on transporation to Lancaster, click/download the PDF file.

Who should attend the 2007 Directors Conference?

  • Art show directors, your board members, and your marketing & PR staff (and if you hold ALL of those positions, this conference is definitely for you!)
  • Organizers of non-profit or promoter shows with paid or volunteer staff.
  • Directors of developing, new or established shows; small, medium and large shows, and everything in between.

Long?s Park Art & Craft Festival

Stay after the conference to visit the Long?s Park Art & Craft Festival, August 31 ? September 3.

Long?s Park is considered to be one of the country?s finest art shows. It receives consistently high marks from artists as one of the most ?artist-friendly? shows, and attracts show patrons from a 5-state area through its successful marketing. Treat yourself to a visit at Long?s Park and learn more about their methods through a behind-the-scenes tour of the show conducted by festival staff.

Vacationing in Lancaster County

Lancaster, PA is well known as a tourist and family destination with many attractions that appeal to people of all ages. Plan to arrive a few days early, or stay late, to enjoy the best of Lancaster. For more information, contact:
PA Dutch Convention & Visitors Bureau
501 Greenfield Road
Lancaster, PA 17601
717-299-8901 ~ 1-800-723-8824

Conference Registration

Register online now by clicking here. Incentives and opportunities for reduced registration fees are offered for those who invite a director of a show that has not previously attended an NAIA Directors Conference. Return to this website for regular updates on conference information.

If you wish to mail in your application (with April 30th postmark for early registration) please download and print the PDF version.

Download the free Adobe PDF Reader

For more information please send an email to Ardath Prendergast Ardath Prendergast or to Toni Mann Toni Mann or call 352-382-7158.

We look forward to seeing you in August!

 

Kathleen Field

ARTIST INFORMATION

Wall quilts – contemporary. Kathleen Field applies contemporary techniques and designs to the traditional craft of quiltmaking. A sabbatical in 1998-1999 led to a thematic change in her work. Inspired by images and text, she transforms these by enlarging, reducing and manipulating. Then, combines them into a quilted union of color and composition.

Lake Forest, IL
Home: 847-295-5125
Work:
Fax: 847-295-6188
Email:
Web: www.kathleenfield.com

VOLUNTEER “LAWYERS FOR THE ARTS” ORGANIZATIONS

CALIFORNIA

Beverly Hills Bar Association Barristers Committee for the Arts
300 S. Beverly Drive, Suite 201
PO Box 7277
Beverly Hills, CA 90212
Phone: 310-553-6644
Fax: 310-284-8290
Email questions: [email protected]
Website: www.bhba.org (go to entertainment law section)
Co-Chair: Stephanie Yost Cameron
Co-Chair: David A. Helfant

California Lawyers for the Arts (Oakland)
1212 Broadway, Suite 834
Oakland, CA 94612
Phone: 510-444-6351
Fax: 510-444-6352
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.calawyersforthearts.org
Executive Director: Alma Robinson

California Lawyers for the Arts (Sacramento)
926 J Street, Suite 811
Sacramento, CA 95814
Phone: 916-442-6210
Fax: 916-442-6281
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.calawyersforthearts.org
Executive Director: Alma Robinson

California Lawyers for the Arts (San Francisco)
Fort Mason Center
Building C, Room 255
San Francisco, CA 94123
Phone: 415-775-7200
Fax: 415-775-1143
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.calawyersforthearts.org
Executive Director: Alma Robinson

California Lawyers for the Arts (Santa Monica and all of Southern CA)
1641 18th Street
Santa Monica, CA 90404
Phone: 310-998-5590
Fax: 310-998-5594
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.calawyersforthearts.org
Executive Director: Alma Robinson

COLORADO

Colorado Lawyers for the Arts
P.O. Box 48148
Denver, CO 80204
Phone: 303-722-7994
Fax: 303-778-0203
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.coloradoarts.org
Executive Director: Anastasia Volkonsky

CONNECTICUT

Connecticut Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts
Connecticut Commission for the Arts

1 Financial Plaza
755 Main Street
Hartford, CT 06103
Phone: 860-566-4770
Fax: 860-566-6462
Email: [email protected] (specify VLA in the subject line)
Website: www.ctarts.org/vla.htm
Executive Director: Allen Hoffman

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

District of Columbia Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts
916 Sixteenth St NW
Washington, DC 20006
202-429-0229

Washington Area Lawyers for the Arts
1120 Connecticut Ave
Suite 260
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-429-0960
Fax: 202-429-0965
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.thewala.org
Executive Director: Eric Easter

FLORIDA

ArtServe, Inc
1350 East Sunrise Boulevard
Suite 100
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33304
Attn: Maureen Kohler
Phone: 954-462-9191
Fax: 954-462-9182
Website: www.artserve.org
Executive Director: Cindy Stoddart
NOTE: Do NOT refer artists needing pro bono assistance here. That’s what the VLA below does.

Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts
Pinellas County Arts Council
14700 Terminal Boulevard
Clearwater, FL 33762
Phone: 727-453-7860
Fax: 727-453-7855
Attn: Bruce Kotchey
Email: [email protected]
ebsite: www.co.pinellas.fl.us/bcc/artscoun.htm
Executive Director: Judith Powers-Jones
NOTE: Really the only VLA in Florida

GEORGIA

Georgia Lawyers for the Arts
Bureau of Cultural Affairs
675 Ponce De Leon Ave.
5th Floor
Atlanta, GA 30308
Phone: 404-873-3911
Fax: 404-873-3911
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.glarts.org
Executive Director: Lisa Kincheloe

ILLINOIS

Lawyers for the Creative Arts
213 West Institute Place
Suite 401
Chicago, IL 60610
Phone: 312-649-4111
Fax: 312-944-2195
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.law-arts.org
Executive Director: William E. Rattner

KANSAS

Mid-America Arts Resources
c/o Susan J Whittfied-Lungren, Esq
PO Box 363
Lindsberg, KS 67456
Phone: 913-227-2321

LOUISIANA

Louisiana Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts
225 Baronne Street
Suite 1712
New Orleans, LA 70112
Phone: 504-523-1465
Fax: 504-529-2430
Website: www.louisiana-arts.com
Executive Director: Dr. Randall L. Bernhard

MAINE

Maine Lawyers and Accountants for the Arts
43 Pleasant St
South Portland, ME 04106
Phone: 207-799-9646

MARYLAND

Maryland Lawyers for the Arts
113 West North Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21201
Phone: 410-752-1633, FAX: 410.752.1090
Email: [email protected]
Website: MDArtsLaw.org

MASSACHUSETTS

Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts of Massachusetts
249A Street
Studio 14
Boston, MA 02210
Phone: 617-350-7600
Fax: 617-350-7610
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.vlama.org
Executive Director: James F. Grace, Esq.

MINNESOTA

Springboard for the Arts
308 Prince St
Suite 270
St. Paul, MN 55101
Phone: 651-292-4381
Fax: 651-292-4315
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.springboardforthearts.org
Executive Director: Joan Wells

MISSOURI

St. Louis Volunteer Lawyers and Accountants for the Arts
6128 Delmar Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63112
Phone: 314.863.6930
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.vlaa.org
Executive Director: Brent L. Harrison

MONTANA

Montana Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts
PO Box 8687
Missoula, MT 59807
406-721-1835
Executive Director: Joan Jonteel, Esq.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

New Hampshire Business Committee for the Arts (NHBCA)
One Granite Place
Concord, NH 03301
Phone: 603-224-8300
Fax: 603-226-2963
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.nhbca.com

NEW YORK

Albany/Schenectady League of Arts Inc.
19 Clifton Ave
Albany, NY 12207
Phone: 518-449-5380
Fax.518-449-5404
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.artsleague.org/

Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts
1 E. 53rd St., 6th Floor
New York, NY 10022
Phone: 212-319-2787 ext 17
Fax: 212-752-6575
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.vlany.org
Executive Director: Elena M. Paul

NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts
P.O. Box 26513
Raleigh, NC 27611-6513
Phone: 919-788-0506
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.ncvla.org
Director: Julie Raines (an attorney)
President: Daniel Ellison ([email protected])
President-Elect: Paul Ferguson ([email protected])

OHIO

Volunteer Lawyers and Accountants for the Arts-Cleveland
113 St. Clair Ave.
Cleveland, OH 44114
216-696-3525

Toledo volunteer Lawyers and Accountants for the Arts
608 Madison, St. 1523
Toledo, OH 43604
Phone: 419-225-3344

OREGON

Northwest Lawyers and Artists / Oregon Lawyers for the Arts
621 SW Morrison Street Suite 1417
Portland, OR 97205
Phone: 503-295-2787
Fax: 503-295-2737
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.aracnet.com/~nwla
President: Kohel Haver

PENNSLYVANNIA

Philadelphia Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts
251 South 18th St.
Philadelphia, PA 19103
Phone: 215-545-3385 ext 25
Fax: 215-545-4839
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.libertynet.org/pvla
Executive Director: Dorothy Manou

Western Pennsylvania Professionals
PO Box 19388
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
Phone: 412-268-8437

RHODE ISLAND

Ocean State lawyers for the Arts
P.O. Box 19
Saunderstown, RI 02874-0019
Phone: 401-789-5686
Fax:
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.artslaw.org
Executive Director: David Spatt

SOUTH DAKOTA

South Dakota Arts Council (SDAC)
800 Governors Drive
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: 605-773-3131
Fax: 605-773-6962
Email:
Website: www.sdarts.org

TEXAS

Artists’ Legal and Accounting Assistance
P.O. Box 2577
Austin, TX 78751
Phone: 512-476-4458
Email: [email protected]
Website:

Texas Accountants & Lawyers for the Arts
1540 Sul Ross
Houston, TX 77006
Phone: 713-526-4876; Toll Free: 800.526.8252
Fax: 713.526.1299
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.talarts.org
Executive Director: Jane S. Lowery, Esq

San Antonio & El Paso Offices: contact TALA at Houston office

UTAH

Utah Lawyers for the Arts
P.O. Box 652
Salt Lake City, UT 84110
Phone: 801-482-5373
Email:
Website:

VIRGINIA

Virginia Lawyers for the Arts
Phone/fax: 888-223-4674
Email: [email protected]
Executive Director: Paige Conner Totaro, Esq.

WASHINGTON

Washington Lawyers for the Arts
1525 4th Ave, 8th Floor
Seattle, WA 98101
Phone: 206-328-7053
Email: [email protected]
Website: theWLA.org

INTERNATIONAL

Canadian Artists Representation Ontario (CARO)/ Canadian Artist’s Representation/le Front des Artistes Canadiens Ontario (CARFAC Ontario)
183 Bathurst St, 1st floor
Toronto, Ontario M5T 2R7
Phone: 416-340-8850
Fax: 416-340-8458
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.caro.ca
Executive Director: Barbara Anderson-Huget

NAIA SURVEY RESULTS

2008 Coconut Grove Survey Results– PDF file

Response from Coconut Grove

2007 “Trends Among Artists: The Changing Artistic Landscape

2007 Suggested Zapplication Upgrades Survey Results – PDF file

2004 Show Directors Booth Slide Survey Results – PDF file

2004 Spring Newsletter Survey Results – PDF file

2000 Artist Survey – PDF file

2000 Show Rankings – PDF file

1999 Artist Survey – PDF file

1999 Show Rankings – PDF file

1998 Artist Survey

1998 Show Rankings

1997 Show Directors Survey – PDF file

Survey results are also available in our newsletter archives


Download Free Adobe PDF Reader (Link opens new window)

Art Festivals and Artists: Developing Policies to Enhance the Industry

January 22, 1999
Museum of Contemporary Art
Chicago, Illinois

The first NAIA Board/ Art Festivals Conference convened at 9:30 am on January 22, 1999 at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. The theme for the conference was Art Festivals and Artists: Developing Policies to Enhance the Industry. To present a more useful record of the conference, this summary has been organized by topic rather than by the actual sequence of the discussion. Consequently, comments do not always appear in the same order that they were presented. They are cited to identify whether the point was presented by a Director, Artist or both.


WELCOME

NAIA President Larry Oliverson and NAIA Board Chair Bob Briscoe served as co-moderators for the conference. Larry opened the conference with a welcome to everyone: For those of you that are less familiar with the NAIA, one of our primary objectives is to foster excellence in the visual arts. We try to accomplish this by using only positive and constructive means. The fact that you are here today indicates that you share this common goal. It also indicates to us that you are taking a pro-active leadership role and for that we thank you. Id like to clarify from the beginning that we have no intent or desire to homogenize the industry. Actually, we appreciate the diversity that exists from show to show. What we have noticed, however, is that there are characteristics common to successful shows, and there are problems common to many shows. We will address some of these issues today, and, by sharing our ideas and experiences, hope to provide the information necessary to result in improved policies. The format for the conference will be a somewhat informal discussion. We want as much interaction as possible. For us, it is equally important that show directors interact with each other as well as interacting with us. Larrys opening remarks were followed by the introduction of everyone attending te conference.

PROMOTING ARTISTIC INTEGRITY

Larry opened this discussion: NAIA Survey results have indicated that both artists and show directors feel that misrepresentation is a big problem. We have identified three forms of misrepresentation: 1) proxy exhibitors, 2) misrepresentation of the art process, or the originality of the work, and 3) deceptive slides. A lengthy discussion on misrepresentation followed and is summarized below.

Proxy Exhibitors

  • Require a drivers license or photo I-D at artists check-in. (Director)
  • Match the artists signature on the signed prospectus to the artists signature at check-in. (Director)

Create an Atmosphere of Enforcement

  • Create an atmosphere where artists understand that the show officials will enforce their rules. (Director)
  • Be fair to all artists and consistent in interpreting the rules. (Artist)
  • Create a specific committee or staff person to be available to the artists, who aids the show director in handling misrepresentation issues. (Both)

Enforcement

  • If violators are identified, it is more effective for show directors to manage issues of misrepresentation during the show dates when the artists and their artwork are present and available.(Director)
  • When an artist is asked to leave a show due to a rule infraction, it should be done at the conclusion of the show day in order to minimize disruption during show hours. (Director)
  • The penalty for rule violation at one show is ejection and a three-year exclusion from the show. (Director)

Complaints Against Rule-Violators

  • Artists were encouraged to be as specific as possible when reporting violators to show officials. (Director)
  • It is extremely difficult for show directors to investigate vague complaints where specific artists are not named. (Director)
  • Concerns were expressed about anonymous accusations. (Both)
  • Artists are sometimes reluctant to submit signed complaints about their colleagues for fear of being labeled as an informer by show directors or colleagues. One suggestion was to have a complaint box, which would enable artists to report rule violators while maintaining their anonymity. (Artist) Preliminary results of the NAIA artists survey indicate that the majority of artists would be willing to report a violation of show rules to a staff or committee member. (Artist)
  • There should be no retribution for artists who report rule violators. (Both)

Improving Ways to Identify Rule Violators

  • One procedure was suggested to enable officials to deal with artists suspected of operating factories with numerous employees. Officials can follow-up a specific complaint with a telephone call to the American Business Data Service (or similar agency in every state). These services have access to business records, which include the number of employees. (Director)
  • One show utilizes a Viewing Committee of seasoned, experienced people who sit in on the slide jurying, then visit every artists booth on each show day to see if the exhibited work is consistent with the slides. This committee reports any inconsistencies to the show director. (Director)
  • Ensuring that the slide jury is also part of the street jury helps to provide continuity and to identify cases where the exhibited work varies significantly from the jury slides. (Director)
  • The critical importance of having show directors (and their staffs) informed and educated concerning all forms of reproductions (both 2-D and 3-D) was discussed. Reference was made to Dale Rayburns article, Reproductions and Original Prints, Whats the Difference? in the fall, 1998 issue of the NAIA newsletter. (Directors)
  • One show director retained the slides of accepted artists permanently as a visual on-site record of the show each year, and for future reference. (Director)
  • In instances where a show rule must be interpreted, the director should try to evaluate the artists intent. Determine whether the process in question is a means of creative expression or primarily a way to circumvent a show rule. An example: An artist who uses the term hand-embellished reproduction to indicate original art. (Artist)
  • A question was raised: should shows maintain records from year to year regarding previous flagrant rule violators from among their shows past participants? (Artist)
  • It was noted that legal problems exist for show directors to exchange information regarding known, flagrant rule violators. (Both)

The Value of Trained Personnel (Artists) in Identifying Instances of Misrepresentation

  • One important aspect of a peer jury system is that peer jurors can walk the show and utilize their expertise to determine if artists are violating show rules. (Both)
  • An advantage of having artists on the jury panel is to have a knowing eye to spot misrepresentation. (Artist)
  • Local artists can be consulted when questions arise. (Director)

THE PROSPECTUS

Larry opened this discussion. The prospectus is one fundamental way to establish policies that are simple, reasonable and enforceable while still being fair and respectful. Criteria for the prospectus include:

  • A clear explanation of the jury system and disclosure of all criteria and policies used for acceptance.
  • Carefully worded requirements: display slide; artist information statement; NAIA slide format
  • Specify: Artist present for duration of event; guidelines required for display slide; work must be produced by the exhibiting artist; consequences/ramifications of non-compliance with rules, etc.
  • Refer to the NAIA ideal show prospectus on webpage.

Summary of the Comments from the Discussion regarding the Prospectus

  • Viewing the prospectuses from other shows may help to develop clearer wording of the specific rules. (Both)
  • There is a critical need for show directors to stay current on the terminology to provide greater clarity concerning reproductions, giclees and other digital prints. (Both)
  • A definition was cited for clarification of the term reproduction: If an original exists in another form then that copy is a reproduction. If the work is originated in the computer, and no other original exists, then it belongs in the computer category.(Artist)
  • Shows need to clearly state the ramifications of violating show rules: whether the artist will be asked to leave the show, if the artist can apply to this show in the future, etc. (Both)
  • If a booth slide is required, please state the specifics. (Examples: if indoor booth display is acceptable; if entire booth must be shown), and explain how the booth slide will be evaluated. (Artist)
  • On the prospectus, address the issue of burden of proof. State whether the burden of proof is on the artist in instances of suspected misrepresentation of exhibited work. Also, state whether the show director has the final authority in interpreting a show rule. (Both)

BOOTH SLIDES

The NAIA Board asked for feedback from show directors concerning the booth slide requirement by asking the following questions:

  • Why does your show reqire a booth slide?
  • Is a booth slide a helpful rule enforcement tool?
  • How do you evaluate the booth slide during the jurying?
  • If you do not require a booth slide for your show, why not?

Summary of director responses to Why does your show require a booth slide?

  • To verify the type and quality of the work shown in the submitted slides.
  • To determine the aesthetic quality of the overall presentation.
  • To show the proportional relationship of works being exhibited (i.e. number of folios for small work; proportion of large and small works to be exhibited)
  • To be used for reference as a visual contract.
  • To help show directors have a better idea of the visual look of their show
  • To help show directors with the show layout.

Summary of director responses to For shows who do not require a booth slide, why not?

  • Booth space was not a standard 10 x 10 configuration.
  • Work submitted in slides must be in direct proportion to the work to be exhibited (example: if a furniture artist also plans to display breadboards, they must be included in the same proportion in the slides). Consequently, these shows may require more than the customary three or four slides so that an accurate representation can be given.

Summary of other comments regarding booth slides:

  • Explain the criteria for evaluating the booth slide to the slide jurors. (Both)
  • Recognize that the quality of the booth structure itself may put beginning artists at a disadvantage. (Artist) Recognize that booth slides can be an additional expense to the artists. Shows arranging for a photographer to be available to take booth slides (optional and at the artists expense) could be helpful. (Both) Stress that artists need to update their booth slides and show current work (Director)
  • Two questions were raised: can indoor booth slides be submitted to outdoor shows? If yes, does this give an unfair advantage to artists who exhibit at indoor shows? (Artist)

ARTIST INFORMATION STATEMENT

Larry opened this discussion. The objectives of the Artist Information Statement are to identify, inform and educate. It should describe succinctly and clearly information about the artists work that might be important to consumers, judges, students, show committees, or other artists. As an educational tool and conversation starter, it should ensure that the viewer understands what is being seen, who made it, and how it was produced. He encouraged shows that want to be known as the leaders in this industry to step to the forefront concerning the Artist Information Statement.

Summary of the discussion regarding the advantages of the Artist Information Statement:

  • The intent of the Artist Information Statement is positive and educational rather than negative or defensive. In the words of one show director, This is a philosophical tenet that we all should embrace as an opportunity to educate. (Director)
  • This statement provides a brief, concise description of each artists work that can be distributed to the media and used for publication. From one show director, We are challenged to interest the media before the show. This statement gives us information to use to develop publicity. (Director)
  • This statement reaffirms to buyers exactly what they are purchasing. (Director)
  • This statement provides a starting point for conversation with the viewing public. (Both)
  • Patrons are assured that they are buying original art. (Director)
  • The statement helps to curb misrepresentation when this information is stated in writing for the public and peers to read. (Both)

Summary of Additional Comments Regarding the Artist Information Statement

  • One benefit expressed to the use of a standardized format for the Artist Information Statement was the consistency and ease in finding specific information from booth to booth. (Director)
  • Standardized format may present certain limitations on an artists personal style. (Artist)
  • Format needs to be clearly defined and consistent among shows. (Artist)
  • For clarity and uniformity, do not include additional biographical information (education, exhibition record, awards etc.) as a part of this statement, but allow such information to be displayed elsewhere in the booth. (Artist)

NAIA NATIONAL CATEGORY ADVISORY PANEL

Dale Rayburn (NAIA board, National Category Advisory Panel) introduced this session. The NAIA is in the process of establishing a National Category Advisory Panel. This panel will be comprised of artists that are experts in their category, are respected by their peers, and have the ability to give fair and impartial advice to shows. These artists will be listed in the NAIA newsletter along with their category and phone number so that art show directors can contact them for advice on any problem that they encounter in connection with that particular category. These national advisors will have back-up delegates, which will also be listed, in case they cannot be reached. Dale noted that shows might also want to develop their own panel of regional category advisors to address their specific concerns.

A DIRECTORS FORUM

Several show directors expressed the desire to have an Internet forum so that they could communicate with one another. Michael Hamilton (NAIA board, webmaster) addressed this suggestion and discussed the establishment of a Directors Forum through the NAIA webserver.

TOWN MEETINGS

Gordon Bruno (NAIA board, professional relations) briefly discussed the possibility of holding town meetings, to be hosted by the NAIA and held on-site at various show locations. This would provide the opportunity for artists to discuss ideas and communicate with an NAIA representative. Several show directors expressed interest in this possibility.

JURY SELECTION

Banister Pope (NAIA board, newsletter editor and former NAIA president) summarized the importance of including artists on the jury panel. The results of the 1998 Artists Survey indicated that 87% of artists want to be evaluated by their peers. He noted that including an artist on the slide jury could be a real asset to help show directors address the issue of fairness and impartiality of their jury selection process. A detailed handout on selecting jurors was available.

The Jurying Process

Several show directors shared their unique slide jurying process. Each show had its own jurying model. A handout compiled by Shary Brown (Executive Director, Ann Arbor Street Art Fair) and David Pinson (Executive Director, Cherry Creek Arts Festival) was distributed. The handout listed the jurying models of seven art festivals from around the country.

 

Summary of Comments regarding the Jurying Process

  • Each jury panel develops its own dynamic, and the selection process becomes totally objective. (Director)
  • Providing jury scores to unaccepted artists can be valuable. It was noted, however, that many shows do not use a traditional, numerical scoring system. Therefore, a number score might not be meaningful when taken out of context. (Director)
  • Rejections are rejections. nowing a jury score would personally not be helpful. (Artist)
  • When developing a wait-list, establish a clear criteria for the order in which the alternates will be invited. (Artist)
  • If the show director has the final authority on accepted artists, state this in the prospectus. (Artist)

BOOTH FEES

Larry opened this discussion. Our NAIA survey results have shown that 97% of artists want booth fees to be due after notification of acceptance. NAIA artists also support a reasonable refund policy for artists who must cancel a show. He asked for feedback.

Summary of the responses regarding Booth Fees

  • Shows that receive booth fees at a later date may experience cash-flow problems that make it difficult to meet early publication deadlines. (Director)
  • If shows are having a cash-flow problem and cannot wait for booth fees to be mailed after acceptance, they should take out a loan. (Director)
  • Checks could be post-dated to the jurying date. (Director)
  • Even if booth fees are due with the application, shows could wait ten days after notification of acceptance before the checks of the artists are cashed. (Director)

Larry asked the directors to address their refund policy for those artists who must apply to more than one show for the same weekend. Several directors expressed the managerial problems and additional costs involved to contact replacement artists. The time lost in duplicating their procedures was hard to recover. One show director asked how to deal with the actual problem of many artists canceling after the jurying has concluded.

The NAIA board responded with the following suggestions:

  1. Develop a strong wait list
  2. Develop a policy to reinvite a certain percentage of artists from the previous years show
  3. Establish specific dates by which artists must cancel to receive refunds.

Larry added that the NAIA has requested a reasonable refund policy.

Discussion followed concerning a definition of a reasonable deadline for refunds:

  • Six weeks before the show date. (Director)
  • One director restated that cancellations, particularly late cancellations have a real, managerial cost.
  • Another director stated that the shows policy regarding late cancellations was a policy intended to be punitive to the artist. The director expressed a strong obligation to the public to present the artists listed in the program, and felt the artists should adhere to their commitment (exceptions may be granted for emergency situations).

Other comments regarding cancellations

  • For shows with a wait-list, the telephone answering machine system (as used by Coconut Grove) is effective and economical. (Artist)
  • One show discussed a sabbatical system whereby a re-invited artist could defer their re-invitation for one year. (Director) Despite careful planning, there still may be instances when artists cancel a show at the last minute because they truly do not have enough work to offer. Due to the nature of this business, they may have to do this with little advance notice. (Artists)

PUBLICITY, MARKETING AND SPONSORSHIP

Banister Pope introduced the session with a challenge to show directors to find creative ways to effectively utilize corporate networking to generate enthusiasm and increase sales.

One way to address the challenge of getting more young professionals interested in, and out to visit and support arts festivals is to fall back on a solid and proven fund-raising principle. The successful response depends on WHO does the asking.

My suggestion for getting those young professionals out of the offices and down to the show is to go directly to their employers. Get out to see the CEO and get their help. It should be remembered though that will you help? is too scary a thing to ask. Most folks in those positions ARE willing to help, especially with a civic event or benefit, but are so careful with their time that an open-ended plea for help puts them off. So the way to go about it is to tell that person what a positive economic and educational impact your event has on the community and how important it is that the professional ranks show their support through their participation and attendance. Ask that he (or she) designate a popular someone in management to help you get the proper crowd out and make a phone call to that person. (Bob, Id like you to assist Ms. Artfair with a project) Youre asking something worthwhile, specific and easy to do, and youll get results.

Whoever it is that is asked or directed by the CEO to help you is likely to be intent on doing a good job. You should meet with that person, discuss objectives and not be afraid to ask how they intend to motivate their workforce. Of course having a few suggestions of your own to offer is pretty important. After youve made comparable contacts among the major employers in town, pick a date and invite all the designated Bobs and Sues to lunch where you treat and they brainstorm and you all agree on what date theyll each let you know what their projected attendance is. Its all pleasant and it works nicely too. Afterwards you of course remember to include those folks in your volunteer appreciation event.

The discussion centered on finding effective methods to attract young professionals to the shows and engage them as art buyers. Several shows offered suggestions and shared examples of their unique marketing strategies:

  • To attract a new level of young professionals, one show is exploring the idea of having an individual professional host an artists booth. By committing a given dollar amount toward the purchase of an art piece, this person would have special access to the artist. (Director)
  • One show uses Art Bucks where the patron pays 90% of the price and a sponsor underwrites the remaining 10%. (Artist)
  • Asking the artists to discount their prices to benefit young professionals may send the undesired message that artists prices are always negotiable and that discounts are always available. If a discount is desired, one option is to select a charity and have 10% of the artists price given to the charity as an artists donation. (Artists)
  • A direct mailing for a champagne evening or a patrons breakfast helps attract patrons. (Both)
  • One shows example: Patrons donate money, and then the juror selects purchase award pieces. The festival retains the rights to the artwork. These works are then displayed in community spaces and public buildings, with proper acknowledgement of the patrons. (Director) Another shows example: An educational program can be designed to develop informed art buyers. A workshop titled Art Collecting 101 is directed by the chief museum curator. A slide of every exhibiting artist is shown, introducing the artwork as well as the materials and processes used in making the actual artwork. (Director)
  • Another example: Specific pieces are selected by the jurors for award consideration. These works are taken into the museum and displayed. Awards are presented, and jurors explain their choices to a group of special patrons. These patrons then have the first opportunity to purchase the award-winning works.

Other comments concerning promotion/publicity

  • Michael Hamilton encouraged show directors to consider using their web site for publicity which could include posing the work of all exhibiting artists. (This may require that exhibiting artists sign a release.)
  • Show directors encouraged artists to submit publicity information and indicate their availability to do interviews with the media.
  • Publicity materials should emphasize the art and the opportunity for the public to buy art.(Artist)

COLLABORATIONS

There was a brief discussion concerning the unique problems that can exist with collaborations. Collaborations are intended to be true artistic collaborations rather than business collaborations. The specific nature of the collaboration (the creative contribution of each artist in the collaborative team) should be carefully detailed. Discussion also centered on whether both artists in collaboration must be present during the show. The question was also raised if collaborations can involve more than two artists. It was suggested that a newsletter article about artistic collaborations might be very helpful and pertinent.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS

Larry briefly mentioned a new mentoring program that pairs college art students with artists for a day during the Winter Park Show. Community education programs, demonstrations for children and adults, were briefly discussed.

Larry Oliverson concluded the conference at 5:00 p.m. and again expressed his appreciation to everyone for attending.

Michael Mode

ARTIST INFORMATION

Michael Mode makes turned wood vessels with lids, composed from burl woods, exotic and colorful tropical woods, highly figured domestic woods, and sometimes laminated into intricate geometric designs.

My motivation as an artist derives from an intense life-long inspiration to create and bring into existence the objects of my imagination, including poetry, painting, drawing, music, and, currently, turned wood vessels. The character and style of my work reflect my fascination with the art and architecture of India and the middle east. Color, geometric surface designs, unusual and exotic woods, gracefully confident forms, fine finishing, attention to detail, and integrity of craftsmanship are equally important and significant to me. A lidded vessel, like a person, offers a choice of openness or privacy; possesses secret inside spaces that can’t be touched; harbors hidden surprises; presents a stature and a posture to the world; these aspects I find endlessly fascinating.

Michael’s work has been purchased for several museum collections, including the Renwick Gallery of American Craft of the Smithsonian, as well as many of the private collections in the United States. He has taught aspects of his woodturning skills at symposiums of the American Association of Woodturners and for local chapters of the same organization as well as at the Arrowmont School for Arts and Crafts in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, and other craft schools around the country. He has written articles for Fine Woodworking, American Woodworker, and Wood magazines, and his work is featured in various books about woodturning and woodworking.

Museums:

  • Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian Museum
  • Museum of American Craft
  • Los Angeles County Museum of Art
  • Yale University Art Gallery

Private Collections:

Nathan Ancell

  • Evanston Hospital Corporation, Evanston, IL.
  • Whoopi Goldberg
  • Irving Lipton
  • Ruth and David Waterbury
  • Ron and Anita Wornick
  • George and Dorothy Saxe

Awards:

  • Ann Arbor Street Art Fair, MI 1998
  • Westchester Craft Show, NY 1997
  • Winter Park Arts Festival, Winter Park, FL 1997
  • American Craft Exposition, Evanston, IL 1996
  • ACC Craft Fair at Baltimore, 1996
  • St. Louis Art Fair, 1995
  • Ann Arbor Street Art Fair, MI 1995
  • Cherry Creek Arts Festival, Denver, CO 1995
  • Mt. Dora Arts Festival, Mt. Dora, FL 1995
  • Washington Crafts Expo, 1994
  • Boston Mills Arts Fest, OH 1993
  • Washington Crafts Expo, 1988, 1989

New Haven, VT
Home: 802-453-4002
Work:
Fax: 802-453-2946
Email:
Web:

Ray Jones

ARTIST INFORMATION

STATEMENT

I make boxes entirely of wood, including the hinges, fasteners, latches, and drawer slides. I love wood and am fascinated by wooden mechanisms and the intersections of various three-dimensional geometric shapes. Wood is not only aesthetically pleasing, but it gives the lids, doors and drawers a wonderfully smooth action.

The tremendous variety of woods that exist in the world intrigues me. I try to use sustainably harvested, plantation-grown, salvaged or otherwise “environmentally friendly” woods whenever possible. The plywoods in my turned boxes are handmade in my shop from selected veneers.

My boxes are made without stains or dyes and are finished with multiple coats of a mixture of linseed oil, polyurethane, and mineral spirits. This protects the wood and brings out its natural color, texture and wonderful “feel”.

All of my pieces are of my own design. A part time assistant helps with finishing and other tasks, always under my direct supervision. Trays, drawers, and partitions in some of my jewelry boxes are made by another woodworker using my designs, techniques, and some of my specially made tooling.

Asheville, NC
Work Phone: 828-298-6007
Send Email
Web: rayjoneswoodboxes.com

NAIA MEMORIAL PAGE

The NAIA Memorial Page was inspired by this post on the NAIA open Forum:

We are a widespread artist community. There are a lot of people doing art shows. And most of us are very busy. Often we can not even stay in touch with those artists we are friends with, let alone those that we know and care about but don’t have much direct contact with. There are times when we do not even learn about their passing for months. Often our opportunity to mourn them and share in memories with our fellow artist‘s is lost to us.

Or on occasion we hear about an artist who has passed away, who we are told was an important part of our communities history, an individual who was a meaningful person in the lives of many, and we have no appropriate place to learn more about them, see examples of their work and listen to what their peers have to say.

Would it be out of place to have a section on the NAIA web site set aside to remember and celebrate those artists whose work, humanity and contributions to our community made our lives a little better? Where artists who have special knowledge about the person can tell us what they were like and why they meant so much to them. Where others can tell a story about that person, some experience shared at a show or on the road that makes us laugh aloud or smile with appreciation or marvel at their strength of character.

As I said, I hesitated to bring this up. I know that the Michigan Guild, the ACC and the NAIA make mention of the passing of an artist in their newsletters but those often lack insight and understanding of the real loss we have experienced. Sometimes it takes a lot of us, contributing what we remember, to make them live on in our hearts and minds. I guess I am thinking about a special NAIA web site where we can pay our respects and learn about our history.

Rick Bruno, NAIA member

Memorials to those important to us…



Please email the to establish a new memorial page. You will be notified when it is ready and you may add your memorial comments to it.

NAIA NEWSLETTER ARCHIVES

Links to the newsletter PDFs will open a new window. If you prefer, save the file to your hard drive or desktop.

Windows: Right mouse click/”Save Target As…”.
Mac:
 Just click?

  • 2002 – Fall  Staff Developments, Director Conference, Des Moines Re-invents an Arts Festival
  • 2002 – Spring  Artists Survey Results, Show Rankings, Weathering Weather, Booth Slides
  • 2001 – Fall  Smokey Hill River Festival, Directors Conference, ACC Jury Methods
  • 2001 – Spring  Artists Survey Results, Show Rankings, Starting a New Art Fair
  • 2000 – Fall  IFEA, Slide Jury Instructions Survey, Jury Process Infroamtion, Mixed Media
  • 2000 – Spring  Artists Survey Results, Show Rankings
  • 1999 – Fall  Initiatives and Misconceptions, Media Advisory Panel, Creativity, Annual Meeting
  • 1999 – Spring  Artists Survey Results, Show Rankings
  • 1998 – Winter  What Artists Want From Shows, Artist Information Statement, Artists Survey Results, Show Rankings
  • 1998 – Fall  IFEA, How NAIA Runs, Annual Meeting, Ann Arbor Street Art Fair

ARTIST RELIEF NOTICES

No current artist relief notices. Good!


If you have an artist relief fund you would like to have displayed here please email the webmaster. Thanks for thinking of your fellow artists. Also please be aware of the Craft Emergency Relief Fund (CERF) that is specifically for craft media people (and very much appreciates and deserves your financial support.)

Digital Seminars

Learn How to Do It/See What they Look Like

  • “I knew ZIP about ZAPP, but this seminar changed all of that. Great job of explaining the jury process, the equipment, the process to prepare art and upload to the site.”
  • “Excellent!”
  • “Covered ZAPP process well!

We are pleased to announce a continuing series of seminars and workshops sponsored by NAIA to help artists learn about the process of creating digital images of your artwork for submission to festivals that are, or soon may be, switching from accepting slides.

Seminars are presented by leading authorities on preparing ZAPP images. With a particular focus on the ZAPPlication? requirements, this seminar will give instructions and answer questions about digitizing your own images for optimal effect, as well as tips for hiring others to prepare your images for you. Additionally, artists will have the opportunity to view their own images projected through the same ROKU and LCD system used by ZAPP?.*

Don’t miss these opportunities to learn more about ZAPP?! Space is limited, so register now!

For more information on preparing digital images, visit Larry Berman’s Preparing Images for Zapp? page.

For more information on ZAPPlication?, visit Zapplication.org.

Upcoming seminars

Following is a tentative schedule of current or upcoming ZAPP/digital seminars that the NAIA is working on to offer to artists. This list may change or expand as we are able to identify other suitable locations. If there is another location where you think a seminar would be beneficial, please contact us so that we may look into scheduling other events. Highlighted entries are currently confirmed seminars – click to go to Registration page. This list will be updated.

Jan 22 – COMPLETE Atlanta, GA
Feb 20 – COMPLETE Kansas City, MO
Feb 20 – COMPLETE Jupiter, FL area ArtiGras
Feb. 26 – COMPLETE Fort Myers, FL ArtFest Fort Myers
Feb. 27 – COMPLETE Naples, FL Naples National Art Festival
March 17 – COMPLETE Winter Park, FL Winter Park Arts Festival
April 10 – COMPLETE Atlanta, GA Dogwood Festival
July 25-26 – COMPLETE Maumee Bay, OH NAIA Artist Conference
Aug 12-14 – COMPLETE Sun Valley, ID Sun Valley Arts Festival
Aug 17 – COMPLETE Lake Oswego, OR Lakewood Center for the Arts
Oct 12 – COMPLETE Albuquerque, NM Pat Barrett’s studio
July 5 – COMPLETE Roswell, GA Raiford Gallery

IMPORTANT! Please email Ardath Prendergast if you think you might attend a seminar but haven’t decided yet and may show up at the door. This will give us a better idea of how many might attend.  Be sure to mention which one you are interested in! Thanks!

Free “Refresher” Opportunities: If you have previously paid for and attended a ZAPP seminar, you are invited to attend additional seminars (space permitting) for free. This is a great opportunity to review any of the information from the seminars, or ask additional questions of the instructors that may have arisen in the interim. Note: This free opportunities applies to seminars only.

 

ZAPPlication? and ZAPP? is a trademark of ZAPP Software,LLC.

NAIA FUNDRAISERS

Welcome to the NAIA Fundraisers page!
The principal financing of the NAIA is through membership dues, gifts/donations and the generous efforts of our volunteers. However, the NAIA has also developed several products that are useful and fun! The proceeds from the sale of these items benefits the work of the NAIA. We hope to continue to add items to this page. As always, we appreciate your purchase and support! Happy Trails!


LIGHTING THE WAY TO A SUCCESSFUL SHOW

The Art Fair Pillar Candle makes no guarantees, but at a stately 8 1/4″ tall, this glass surrounded candle can help along the way. The colorful illustrations done by NAIA member Holly Foss playfully illustrate judges that love our work, perfect booth layouts,good music, real bathrooms, great sales, a visible show director, nice neighbors, a smooth set up, an easy drive and well advertised show. Last but not least………making money!

Although this candle makes no financial promises, the mere fact that you have invested in the industry that supports your livelihood will bring you good karma.
The aura this karma creates will insure good vibes while applying to shows.
This unscented pillar candle will light a trail to success!

Our wonderful fund raising candle is a great gift for the artist in your life or yourself. Stock up now! 2008 awaits!

$20.00 each
Two for $30.00
Three for $40.00
(prices include shipping)

Contact NAIA for bulk pricing on large quantities at: Candle Info

To place your order online fill out the order form below, below at bottom of page. To order by phone or email: please contact Bonnie Blandford by phone: 616-241-3084,
or email: Candle Info

Artwork for both candles was created and donated by member Holly Sue Foss. Thank-you Holly!


What is Art?

See a Preview of “What is Art?” on YouTube here.

NAIA member John Booth spent several years filming festival artists answering the question, “What is art?” You will recognize many of the artists in his video and find that their answers are as diverse as their art. And it’s just plain fun! John has graciously allowed us to sell his wonderful DVD video as a NAIA fundraiser. Thank-you John! Only $20.00 plus $3.00 postage.

To place your order online fill out the order form below, at bottom of page. To order by phone or email: please contact Bonnie Blandford by phone: 616-241-3084,
or email: DVD info

 


Click here to preview the Survival Guide.

May 12 , 2007

The long-awaited Art Show Artists’ Survival Guide is now available! The Survival Guide is a resource of tips, ideas and inspiration by your fellow NAIA artist members. The experienced festival artist as well as the novce will find a treasure trove of insight, helpful hints and inside information that are sure to make your art show experience easier and more successful.

Contact Information: survival Guide Info
National Association of Independent Artists (NAIA)

Click here to PURCHASE the Survival Guide.

With over 200 well-organized tips, the “Art Show Artists’ Survival Guide” covers all the aspects of the festival artist’s life. The Survival Guide is a resource of tips, ideas and inspiration by your fellow NAIA artist members. The experienced festival artist as well as the novice will find a treasure trove of insight, helpful hints and inside information that are sure to make your art show experience easier and more successful. Festival directors will also find this a pleasurable

A “Yellow Pages” resource guide puts industry-related business contact information at your fingertips, and you will easily see those businesses that offer discounts to NAIA members. Those businesses highlighted in red offer discounts to NAIA members. The “Survival Guide” is also sprinkled with quotes, stories, humor and photos of the contributors make this small gem a pleasure to read.

NAIA Artist Member John Bauman has this to say about the Survival Guide: “In the NAIA Art Show Artists’ Survival Guide finally there is a compilation of all the most practical advice of some of the most seasoned artists currently surviving art fairs themselves. The art fair life is hard enough to survive. Finally, a group of artists (the NAIA) has taken it upon themselves to make it just a little easier. Can I go back thirty years and have a do-over?”

Duke Klassen, another NAIA Artist Member, says, “Amazing! After thirty-odd years of doing art fairs here comes a survival guide that makes life easier. Easy solutions, ingenious solutions, down-right clever solutions to all of the problems that crop up in an art -fair-road-warrior’s life. Seeing and hearing ideas from people we all know makes the guide compelling reading. The simplicity and ingenuity of many of the suggestions leave me in awe of the tribe we all belong to.”

And Jay Downie, Director MAIN ST. Ft. Worth Arts Festival says: “I have read the Survival Guide and immediately put it on our “must read” list for staff and artist-relations volunteers alike. It provides a clear and concise perspective of the challenges artists face day in and day out as they work to present quality work to a discriminating public, often under less than ideal circumstances. The information it contains will help us improve our ability to help them be successful and broadens our understanding of their world.”

The Survival Guide is available in a full-color edition for $23.52. Internet sales are handled through the print-on-demand publisher Lulu.com.

So be the first on your block at your next art show to own a copy of the NAIA “Art Show Artists’ Survival Guide!”

Click here to PURCHASE the Survival Guide.


ONLINE ORDER FORM

Order Candles and DVDs Online Here:

 

More coming…

Sharon Matusiak

ARTIST INFORMATION

Sharon Matusiak’s “Jewelry for the Wall” are mixed media on wood contemporary sculptures. Color and texture are essential aspects of her work. She generally restricts her forms to classic symbolic shapes such as the circle and ellipse, but occasionally works with abstract forms. Sharon invites inquiries for commission work. Please contact by letter or e-mail for her national show schedule.

Music and Mythology are the major influences on Sharon’s work, suggesting themes, symbolic shapes and colors, and even titles. Consequently her sculpture has many cross-cultural references, often echoing Oriental, Egyptian, Afrikan and Mayan influences. Music study is a mathematical endeavor and although Sharon hasn’t studied music since a teenager, she is now finding that it is emerging in visual form with geometric shapes being grouped to set up rhythms and scales. The Moons and Cocoons Series are contemporary shields–they are mixed media on wood, wall sculptures.

The richness of the surface is as important to Sharon as the form, so much of her time is spent adding texture. She does this in both reductive and additive ways—that is some textures are produced by carving the wood, and much of it is produced by the addition of other materials (rope, twine, reeds, torn canvas, rice paper, metal leaf) to the shaped surface. Texturing of the surface has been an ongoing process of experimentation for her for the past 15 years when she switched from painting on canvas to wood. During this period she has developed her skills of woodworking and wood carving. To purists her methods and technique are radical. However the unconventional use of materials is key to her success.

Although Sharon works in series, making several pieces of similiar design, no two are ever colored, textured and shaped the same. Each bears it’s own distinct personality.

Marion, IL
Home: 618-964-1217
Work:
Fax: 618-964-9137
Email:
Web: jewelryforthewall.com

Michael Hamilton & Dee Roberts

ARTIST INFORMATION

Michael Hamilton and Dee Roberts create fine wood boxes and accessories.

Dee and I look at our boxes as small pieces of furniture that can be held in the hand and displays our attention to detail and love of the wonderful variety found in wood. The boxes in their present form came about, as much good design does, from a slow evolution and refinement of design.

EDUCATION

  • Michael: BFA (Ceramics) California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, CA 1978
  • Dee: BFA (Painting) California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, CA 1978

EXHIBITIONS

  • Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft Show
  • American Craft Exposition, Evanston, IL
  • Cherry Creek Art Festival (Award)
  • Sausalito Art Festival (Award)
  • Coconut Grove Art Festival (Award)
  • Ann Arbor Street Art Fair
  • Saint Louis Art Fair
  • Plaza Art Fair, Kansas City (Award)
  • Washington Craft Show
  • ACC Craft Shows

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

  • Columbus Art Festival, OH, June 3-6 (Tentative)
  • Portland Art Festival, Portland, OR, June 25-27
  • Cherry Creek Art Festival, Denver, CO July 3-5
  • Ann Arbor Street Art Fair, July 21-24
  • Sausalito Art Festival, Sept. 3-6

GALLERIES

  • The Real Mother Goose, Portland, OR
  • Northwest Fine Woodworking, Seattle, WA
  • Geoffrey Roth Ltd., Sedona, AZ
  • Signature Galleries, Boston, MA
  • Show Of Hands, Denver, CO
  • Artifacts, Indianapolis, IN
  • Ariodante, New Orleans, LA
  • Seldom Seen, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
  • Gallery Eight, LaJolla, CA

PUBLICATIONS

  • “The Art of Making Small Wood Boxes”, Tony Lydgate; Sterling Pub.
  • Fine Woodworking Magazine Design Book Six
  • Colorado Living magazine

Boise, ID
Home: 208-345-6384
Work: 208-345-6384
Fax:
Email:
Web: www.avocet.net/

Spring 2002 Directors Conference

2002 SHOW DIRECTORS CONFERENCE

April 30 and May 1, 2002
New Orleans, LA

The third NAIA Show Directors Conference convened on Tuesday morning. Board member and conference organizer, Toni Mann, welcomed everyone and thanked show directors for bringing samples of their promotional items, publications and artist market materials to share with others in attendance.

NAIA President Larry Oliverson explained the purpose of the conference is to foster communication between shows and artists, and between shows themselves as a networking tool. The agenda covers many specific topics, but substantial time will be designated as “open agenda” for discussion on topics of choice. Introductions were made around the room.

DAY 1: TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2002

Agenda Topic: Getting the Job Done Overcoming Obstacles Faced by Events
Presenters: Shary Brown, Ann Arbor Street Art Fair, Ann Arbor, MI, and Mo Dana, Des Moines Arts Festival, Des Moines, IA

Mo Danas focus was on fundraising. She opened the discussion by saying, “Overcoming obstacles is my whole year!”. With an operating budget of $1 million, fundraising for Des Moines Arts Festival is her biggest challenge in order to fulfill the festival mission of enriching the quality of life in the Des Moines area and entertain with quality art, yet still being affordable to the public. Her charge is to create “something to hang our hat on that draws the best artists to Des Moines”, is a tourist attraction, and is also an event that Fortune 500 companies can use to recruit high-end professionals to the city.

Mo believes in stressing the ART in her $400,000 markting and promotion budget, and her “Embrace an Artist” ad campaign stresses buying art. However, to do this means de-stressing the beer, etc. Consequently, earned income is low. An evolution from the 40-year-old Des Moines Arts Centers “Art in the Park”, the festival also pays an annual $50,000 “franchise fee” to the Art Center. While the festival is happy to do so, it is also a struggle. Therefore, sponsorship is key. And the sponsors who spend anywhere from $100 to $75,000 MUST be kept happy to feel their investments are worthwhile.

Mo concluded by reminding everyone that without money, the festival cant accomplish its lofty ideals of keeping fees low to the artists so they arent “charged” to pay for entertainment or to benefit the community.

Shary Browns largest obstacles for the Ann Arbor Street Art Fair during the past few years have been political, causing her to re-examine, “What is the role of these events in a community” when a small portion of that community wants an ever-growing piece of the event. The mission of AASAF is to connect the public with the art, and is one of 5 shows that will take place in Ann Arbor during the same weekend in July. When merchants in the area where AASAF was located decided to create their own show modeled after the State Street event, AASAF was forced to find a new location. At first, it looked like a hopeless situation in a town the size of Ann Arbor, but they made remarkable progress in getting the attention of city council, and support of planners, artists, etc., and creating the “voice that was heard” how the event is perceived nationally. A new location has been identified for next year. When AASAF moves, Art Fair Village will expand to fill the old space and more artists will be added to the overall size of the 5 combined shows.

Shary noted that Ann Arbor is different than any other event due to:
1. Size: While the sheer size of the 5 events is a risk, it is not necessarily a death knell. But it requires planners to focus on the positives of the shows and build upon those as a core asset.
2. Variety: The variety in the shows creates a very wide breadth. While very eclectic, it is solid work and is an event worth traveling to.

Still, the concern is how BIG can the festivals grow and the city still be able to support the events? With shows that bring in more than 800,000 visitors to the small town over the 4 days, it creates a tremendous strain on city services.

The floor was opened for questions:

Q: How do all five directors work together? Shary: Since all have different missions, it works OK. For a while, the three core shows collaborated on collective things (operation, support, advertising, etc.)

Q: What is the best way to deal with an event that is treated like a “red-haired stepchild” (when compared to the other famous event her city is known for)? (posed by Susan Coleman, St. James Court Art Show)
Shary: Use your Board of Directors as a “tool” by recruiting members who are politically savvy. The Ann Arbor board was carefully created and is involved in the workings of the event and sees value in what they do. Still, an issue is that boards tend not to plan for the future. AASAFs challenge in moving the event turned out to be the silver lining to address issues and embrace change. She recommends:
1. When change is happening, encourage everyone to think philosophically and with vision, and embrace who you are as a core;
2. Think “esthetically” to see the vision (In AASAFs case, this meant hiring a professional planner was an “absolute must”).

Q: How much of the budget is earmarked for advertising?
Shary: Michigan embraces art fairs. They dont need to advertise much, but they use a lot of gorilla marketing. Their $20,000 advertising budget is spent on hiring consultants whose services provide them with a $200,000 campaign. Yet while it is an advantage that everyone knows about the Ann Arbor shows, it is a double-edged sword because people already think they know what is happening.

Q: What are your staff sizes?
Mo: 3 full-time staff.
Shary: 1 full-time, 1 -time; 1 intern.

Q: What sort of in-kind support do you get?
Shary: They are not good at getting a lot of in-kind. Entertainers are not paid, but most everything else is paid for on an austere budget. The Convention and Visitors Bureau provides a lot of support, although no economic impact study has been done.

Q: What was the process in choosing a new location?
Shary: 7 sites were toured during last years event. They worked closely with city council members they would have to deal with in order to build a partnership.

Q: How has the economic downturn affected your funding?
Mo: I read companies Annual Reports for insight how to approach them for funding. As an example, I have created a program that allows funders to pay in 3 yearly terms (4 years for construction companies).

Agenda Topic: Registration Processes Universal/Online Applications Revisited Computerized Jury Score Tabulation and On-Site Jurying Methods.

Computerized Jury Score Tabulation
Presenter: Sara Shambarger, Krasl Art Fair

Krasl began using computerized jury score tabulation two years ago when Benton Harbor, MI-based Whirlpool Appliance Company helped develop a computer system. Using overhead transparencies, Sara explained that judges use laptops to enter judging scores into a basic Excel spreadsheet template. After completion of judging, all spreadsheets are combined into a master tabulation sheet by copying and pasting. Weighted scores are calculated, and a pivot table is created that provides the final ranking and invitation list.

For slide jurying, Krasl uses 4 outside judges whose scores are weighted to account for 90% of the total score, and 4 Krasl judges whose scores supply the remaining 10%. Artists are scored on a 1 7 scale using all numbers and no zeros. (Larry noted that a study has shown that statistically this is the best method.) 50% of artists are invited back the following year.

Larry noted that Krasls system is one example of a good system that works that does not require the judges to be computer literate. The beauty of it is its concept and the record that it keeps, as well as the tremendous timesavings. Krasl has offered to make the system available to other shows if they desire.

Q: How does Krasl determine how many artists are accepted in each category?
A: A survey was done some years ago to determine what would make a balanced show. Although there is a bit of discretion, the balance is determined mostly by the panel.

Q: What do the various shows do with ties?
Sara (Krasl): So far, it hasnt happened.
Mo Dana (Des Moines): If a tie happens, judges will revisit slides until the tie is broken
New Orleans JazzFest: Staff scores
Three Rivers: Advisory Committee determines
Arts, Beats & Eats: Look at the difference between artists to create a variance.

Q: How do you input artists into the system for site jurying when you have a last-minute wait list addition?
A: Since Krasl judges by booth , it doesnt matter.

Discussion opened up to general comments about jurying processes, including:
Should discussion
 among jurors be encouraged?
For shows that require a 15-word statement
 from artists for the slide jury, how is it used and perceived by artists?
How important is it to artists
 to receive their scores from jurying? Varying opinions were expressed with no consensus among conference participants. The exception was a general acknowledgement that 15-word statements would not eliminate the need for individual slide descriptions since both are often used during jurying. Sara noted that Krasl allows jurors to discuss slides, but that she moderates and sets boundaries and parameters. All statements submitted by artists are read to the jurors.

Note: Don Ament said he would like to write an article for the NAIA newsletter about how shows use the 15-word statement and what kinds of things shows would like to see in them. He asked directors present to write a response to him.

Universal/Online Applications Revisited Presenter: Larry Oliverson, for WESTAF.

Larry referred to a hand out in the Conference folder of notes from a December 2000 meeting that was held in Chicago to discuss the feasibility of cooperative art fair applications and the use of the Internet to introduce jurying efficiencies. Larry noted that this process began when the NAIA pushed for some standardization in procedures. WESTAF (Western States Arts Federation) made a presentation at last years Director Conference. Their process is divided into two parts:
1. Information gathering, and
2. The imagery and judging from digital images.

Although there are advantages as well as disadvantages to such a process, it appears inevitable that something like this will be happening in the future. The objective is to have one application online with universal information, and pop-up menus for information about specific shows. WESTAF has new Linux-based software they have developed applicable to the grant writing process that could be modified for the art fair industry and adaptable to all forms of software and manipulation. Since adopting such a system will require trust, it may be difficult to accept at first, but could become a win-win situation.

It was recognized that a large hurdle would be in the quality and consistency of digital images. It was considered whether WESTAF would need to scan all images in order to insure consistency, but as monitors improve, viewing quality would become less an issue.

Conference participants were encouraged to read the handout from WESTAF, and to consider whether this approach is appealing to the shows.

Agenda Topic: Making Your Event Accessible: Understanding and Implementing the Americans with Disabilities Act
Presenter: Laura Grunfeld, Human Resources Director, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival.

With the enactment of the ADA in 1990, the U.S. is slowly coming into compliance and the Department of Justice is now beginning to pay more attention to smaller events and temporary set ups to insure accessibility. Laura discussed the procedures her event takes to insure the Jazz Festival is one of the most accessible events in the country to persons with disabilities.

Why is it important to be accessible? It is the right thing to do. Accessibility makes the event more enjoyable. Disability is increasing among patrons. Places with wheelchair accessibility are also accessible to families with children in carriages. It is good business sense – people with disabilities and their families have incomes! It is a civil right, and it is the law.

Both artists and events need to consider accessibility. Jazz Festival sends a brochure to artists, “Making Your Booth Accessible”, with suggestions such as: Allow access spaces of 36″ wide, and Set displays of artwork no higher than 36″ from the ground.

  • Considerations for events include:
  • Designate a staff member or volunteer as an ADA coordinator, and train the coordinator
  • Think about different types of disabilities and how you might accommodate them
  • Evaluate your site for accessibility:
    • How would people with disabilities get there?
    • Once there, can they get in?
    • Can they get access to all goods and services (including restrooms)?
    • How can they deal with other barriers?
    • How will they exit, especially in an emergency?

Some disabilities are not immediately visible, so it is important to be aware and considerate. The goal is to serve all persons with dignity. Jazz Fest now has many more people with disabilities who attend.

Many ADA regulations can be found on the Internet. NEA has an accessibility staff and can also be a source. Conference participants were also referred to Lauras handout, “Making Your Event Accessible” for further suggestions.

Q: As a small businessperson, is an artist required to follow these procedures?
A:
 The law requires “reasonable accommodation”, but sometimes it is better to go beyond what is required. Accessibility can take place in steps; DOJ wants to see that a plan is in place.

Toni noted accessibility issues may also apply to artists themselves who may need special accommodations and suggested applications ask this question.

Agenda Topic: Corporate Sponsorship Advantages/Concerns

(This agenda topic arose from concerns of artists how sponsorship is impacting events. Discussion was directed by conference participants and moderated by Larry.)

Bob Briscoe noted this topic came up in an NAIA Town Hall meeting this winter. Concerns are that corporate sponsor booths are so close to artists that it becomes confusing whether a festival is about the art or the event, and change its ambiance. Artists understand the need for sponsorship since artist fees dont make a dent in event budgets, but are concerned about how pervasive it becomes. Larry suggested the issue might be how to intertwine the needs of artists and sponsors to make it work in a good way.

Mo Dana noted Des Moines has strict restrictions that all sponsors must be art-related. She spends 25% of sponsors support on the sponsor package that features some kind of art education to attract people who dont think about art at first, but may then buy art.

Shary pointed out that sponsorship is one of the biggest challenges shows face. Media sponsors are the most difficult to place: they come first and have the most clout, and are the least interested in broadcasting from any place but the central spot.

Carol Romine (Coconut Grove) would appreciate hearing more from artists about problems, but when a sponsor pays $50,000, they want to be in the middle of the event.

It is also difficult to work with and place sponsors promoting sales activities and elaborate giveaways.

Larry said artists see problems immediately when pulling into a show, but its tough to change things when the show is happening. From attending IEG seminars, he recognizes that sponsorship is a business deal, not philanthropy; sponsors need to get value for their dollar.

Directors asked artists to tell them about events where sponsor relations WORK.

Larry noted that Stephen King (MAIN ST. Fort Worth Arts Festival) wears a sponsors hat or badge when doing TV spots so they are seen in the background. Carol noted that flagship TV stations need to be in place well before the event. Cynthia Davis suggested requesting media to interview artists before and during the show, which most try to do.

Mo said that to get sponsorship money, find out who is making money and who hasnt given to the community and what they are interested in. She often uses a “patron is a voter” technique to make them understand that the patron wont be happy with the sponsorship if they try to leverage it. Her philosophy: “Tell them what they want; what you are doing; and what you just did.”

  • Other ideas and thoughts:
  • Read every word of the Wall Street Journal every day so you know what companies are doing. (Mo)
  • Check out the Sunday paper for who is advertising. (Carol)
  • Know what is going on in your community, as well as what the market can bear; know the value you are giving them. (Brandy)
  • Every level of sponsorship has different benefits package. Dont charge more each year to old sponsors who supported you over the years, but charge more to new sponsors. (Mo)
  • Only sponsors get their names in keepsake programs; no ads are sold (Mo)
  • Cherry Creek Arts Festival dropped sponsor level charged to have a presence on site from $40,000 to $10,000 to get away from “snobby” images of privilege; now focus on “what can we do to help you”? (Terry)
  • Agenda Topic: Media Relations
    Presenters: Mo Dana, Des Moines Arts Festival and Cindy Fitzpatrick, Metris Uptown Art Fair

Mo noted the issue is how to get sponsors and artists more “bang for the buck”

Ideas for better media success:

  • Put together talking points to help sell art; hand out to
    • All artists
    • Board members and anyone else to be interviewed.
    • Create talking points for interviewers also, and tell them what to say
    • All volunteers and staff told not to do any interviews
  • What is news? Important to understand
  • Press releases:
    • Only well written new news releases;
    • Must have a consequence, solicit interest and be timely (can send news releases about everything!)
  • Surviving a media interview
    • Sometimes you shouldnt answer questions (esp. if negative or loaded questions)
    • Always have 3 things you want to get out about your event
    • People dont listen to the questions; only the answers
    • Focus on Who, What, When, Where, Why
    • Take sponsors to interviews, but dont let them speak!
  • Ad campaigns
  • All campaigns centered on telling people to buy art
  • Purpose of music, shade & food is to make people stay longer to buy art!

Cindy added:

  • Feed stories to the media and sponsors. Dont talk about any problems with event
  • Be careful whom you steer media to interview.
  • Be ready for things you know are going to happen and deal with negatives before the question comes up.
  • Begin promotion way ahead of time & work on it all year long. Dont bombard with blanket releases, but have unique ideas in each (ex: Barbie campaign of “Expose Yourself to Art” for a pre-show event). Finds media now calls her in advance to “find out whats new”.
  • Play off one media against another: Give them “exclusives” on a story for a limited time, but that will give to another media if they dont print the story.
  • Look for reporter bylines and cultivate those who covers events like yours.

Toni suggested meeting media at the gate of your event and walking them to the best spot, or they may film whatever is closest and handy for them

Shary added it is good to get to know artists who have unusual stories to feed to the media, and be able to pump it out immediately to the press. She encourages artists to send usable things to her.

Mo concluded, “Were going to make mistakes and we need help from other show directors and artists to help us improve.” Larry responded, “Its wonderful to see changes being made with the shows and artists communicating. It used to be that artists didnt feel they were listened to.”

Brandy asked show directors to share some interesting media ideas:

  • Coconut Grove sent out sheets to artists asking for information. Winter Park has an area for the media where artists would have work ready to show. (Connie Mettler, Arts, Beats & Eats)
  • TV sponsor is doing a feature on “The Road to the Cherry Creek Arts Festival” about an artist who was finally accepted after 11 years of applying. Documentary will start in Boston as the artist packs up, another segment on the way in Indiana, etc. (Terry)
  • Focused a story on an artist who was at the show every year for 30 years (Susan Coleman, St. James Court Art Show)
  • Send food to news crews with a little taste treat before festival (Lynnette Wallace, Bayou City Art Festival)
  • A young girl will be a special “roving reporter” at festival to talk about art (Mo)
  • Use PBS/NPR for longer festival stories; commercial stations wont complain (Shary)
  • Keep festival visible year round. Her media sponsor follows Coconut Grove from application deadline, through jury, to a “surprise” visit to an artist with an acceptance packet and follows up through the festival (Carol)

Pamela asked if shows would like to have press kits on artists. All shows answered, “Yes.” NAIA is trying to encourage artists to create press kits.

Agenda Topic: Open Agenda

WESTAF Online Applications. Larry raised the topic again and suggested the NAIA could act as a conduit between WESTAF and show directors. Terry Adams, Beth Hoffman, Cindy Fitzpatrick and Shary Brown said they were willing to look at the WESTAF process. Larry will put them all in touch.

Show Rankings

Mo raised the issue that many shows like to use show rankings as a measure of success for media purposes, but wondered if there is a good way to measure success?

The four main ranking sources are: NAIA, ArtFair SourceBook, the Harris List, and Sunshine Artist.

Jennifer noted it is puzzling that while SA places Three Rivers in the Top 200 shows, they give them a bad review. Kip responded that the SAs ranking comes from artists who report sales; but it is an individual artist who does the review. Pamela noted that most rankings are based on the number of responses received from artists. Keena (Jazz Fest) says their policy is to not put any ranking cards in artist packages, but wonders if that ends up hurting them?

Larry referred to an insert in the conference packet from Greg Lawler that explains AFSB procedures. Greg says the more responses he can get, the better it usually is for the show; if responses are low, rankings are often low since complainers usually respond first. Pamela reminded directors that artists use AFSB for reasons other than how shows do, and that it was designed for artists usage. However, Jennifer said that SA and AFSB can “make or break” a show — she called one of the publications and they said they would edit some comments about the show, but they did not do so. Georges (Krasl) concern is that there is no set of standards for the rankings, and asked, “Would artists ever be comfortable with that method when jurying??”

Susan noted that while AFSB sends show reports to directors for comment before they are published, NAIA does not. Larry responded the reason is that NAIA prints everything they get without any editing in order to remain completely open. NAIA takes no sides on anything. A suggestion was made by a number of directors that NAIA should then let shows have the same opportunity to comment. The other show directors soundly supported this suggestion.

Rick Nugent pointed out that many artists dont pay attention to any rankings; they believe in trying the show for themselves.

Sarah Rishel suggested that shows that are upset with the rankings process consider sending a communal letter to the publications.

Shary noted that one publication in particular has been notoriously inaccurate over the years, but it is not to the shows benefit to complain since it is too hard to change things, and even then, they are often still wrong.

Terry raised a question about NAIAs survey: How could a show be ranked high in 2 of 5 categories, yet have only 1 positive comment? Larry said that although NAIA is comfortable with their list ranking, it is hard to know how to handle the comments and feedback section.

Mo recognizes that it will only be “so long” before the “honeymoon” for Des Moines is over, but artists tell her they have more concerns about shows than just sales. As directors, we need to realize that the current publications are really for artist usage, only. Mo suggested it would be nice to see rankings that are more encompassing, such as whether the sponsors are a benefit to shows?

Pamela said that most artists know how to interpret the comments section. Most use the guides for reference only.

Brandy noted the concern with rankings is that it is the only way for shows to know if they were doing a good job. Her concern is whether shows get an accurate evaluation if not many NAIA members; SA artists, etc. do the show.

Agenda Topic: Category Presentation
Original Printmaking Processes
Presenter: Deborah Mae Broad

Deborah Mae Broad presented an interesting and informative lecture and slide show that explained and compared traditional forms and techniques of Printmaking: ? Planographic ? Relief ? Intaglio

Note: Deborahs lecture is not captured in these conference notes since most of it was specific to the slides being presented. However, she also explained that new technologies are coming onto the market that are likely to dramatically change the process of printmaking using materials that are less toxic (such as DuPonts new “Image On” film). New technologies are creating “crossover mediums” that are becoming hard to define. In particular, processes now allow photographic prints to be processed through printmaking methods, causing confusion as to exactly what the medium is, especially when it comes to jurying. She advised directors that if they are seeing slides that look like photographs being submitted in the print category, they should not immediately assume the artist is cheating. These new processes are likely to change printmaking and will eventually become part of the vocabulary.

Conference participants unanimously congratulated Deborah Mae on an excellent presentation and would enjoy having more category presentations in future conferences.


DAY 2: WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 2002

Larry welcomed everyone back for the concluding day. He has received suggestions that future conferences set aside time for participants to say something about their events either by way of comment or for feedback. But he invited all directors today to share an idea, information or aspect about their show they are proud of, or to discuss some of their major challenges:

Wyandotte Street Art Fair Leslie Lupo
Explosion – Last year, the Aldofino Chemical Plant, located 13 blocks from the festival site, exploded while the fair was happening. For a while, it appeared they would have to shut down totally, but police and fire departments were at the ready, and allowed them to stay open. Although attendance was low, they felt fortunate to get through the fair.

Columbus Arts Festival Katie Lucas
Volunteer Committee – A 50-person coordinating committee an amazing volunteer staff who work extremely hard — runs Columbus. Their new director (profiled in Smart Money magazine last month) is raising the level of their stage acts for next year a move being highly supported.

Arts, Beats & Eats Lisa Konikow and Connie Mettler
Growth in attendance – Lisa noted AB&E “got really big, really fast” from 100 artist spaces and only 90 applications and attendance of 200-300,000 people the first year, to over 1.3 million people last year. While AB&E is a long, grueling 4-day urban event, she and Connie Mettler work hard to preserve their “grid of art” in the middle of a big music festival. Connie noted the AB&E promoter has now absorbed the Greektown Festival in Detroit as well, and while the promoter is fabulous, the challenge there is also how to make the ART stand out without being tacky.

Lakefront Festival of Arts Beth Hoffman
Weather – Lakefront faced tremendous weather and unusual challenges last year that turned their site into acres of mud. Although they did their best to distribute hay and lay down walkways, they realize it was still a tough situation for artists and public alike.
Art Collecting Their “Art Collecting 101” promotion brings in speakers before the event to discuss how to collect art. It attracts novices as well as experienced collectors. Slides from artist participants are used to illustrate various principles.
New Museum Money raised from event is used for the Lakefront Museums new acquisition fund. The new museum addition has received the Time Magazine award of the year for architecture a magnificent design with “wings” like a seagull that open and close to control lighting.

Upper Arlington Arts Festival (Ohio) Lynette Santoro-Au
Site – The 36-year-old festival is in its third location. Now on a ball field, their site is multi-purpose: the day after the festival, Little League season starts. Parents challenge her with concerns when they see booths on the field and so many people walking on it during the festival. Lynette also faced the challenge two years ago when she joined the festival that all procedures were only in peoples heads and nothing was written down. She looks forward to working with her newly organized coordinating committee and is encouraging them to take ownership of the event.

Des Moines Art Festival Mo Dana
Handouts to share Mo brought handouts that she placed on tables in the back of the room that she is willing to share, including:
1. Food vendor applications,
2. Production sheets and timelines,
3. Recommendations for research on sponsorships, and
4. Her non-profit package on how local non-profit organizations can get involved.

Red River Revel Arts Festival – Kip Holloway
Nightmare story: 30% of Red River Revels audience for the 8-day event comes from East Texas, since it is only 180 miles east of Dallas. RRR is known for their artist hospitality. After years of changing its site location every year, they stabilized in a location. When the citys mayor said once again the festival would lose its site, tremendous protest from the public and festival staff convinced the mayor to build a permanent site. However, they discovered that asphalt for the artist market site laid a couple of days before the festival acted as a dam when it rained and water was up to peoples knees! But all has been corrected now. Education program: RRRs large art education program brings 4th graders in from every school within 2 parishes for days of performances that promote unity, understanding and belief in their own capabilities. A current childrens project has kids drawing on unbleached muslin from which quilters will create quilts for abused kids.

St. James Court Art Show – Susan Coleman
History St. James Court is an original suburb of Louisville, and is a historic preservation district of Victorian homes. The festival began in 1956 as a “squatters” show of 11 painters to raise money for the district. As it gained in popularity, it grew to encompass 6 neighborhood sections that exhibits 750 artists overall. Since the prior festival director ran things from her own head for 37 years, she left no computer records or written procedures, so much is being developed from scratch.
Education
: Louisville closes schools on the Friday of the festival so that school children can attend.

Metris Uptown Art Fair Cindy Fitzpatrick
Marketing Challenge There is a grocery store located within the show area that is now trying to sell its own sponsorships. Cindy is considering how to deal with this.

New Orleans Fresh Art Festival Martha Landrum
New show Presented by the Arts Council of New Orleans, the festival began last year with 65 artists and will present 85 this year on cobblestone streets. In organizing the show, the Council first concentrated on raising money before they even began planning.

Girls Inc. Annual Arts and Crafts Fair Deborah Leyba-Dominguez
Misconceptions People tend to think that this fair in the downtown historic has displays of art only by “little girls” or women, but it attracts artists internationally. The $13,000 budget is spent mostly on advertising, and brings in an audience of 40,000.

Bethesda Row Arts Festival Laura Hudson / Lori Corley
Laura is a paid consultant for the festival begun 6 years ago for the Federal Realty Investment Trusts Merchant Marketing Group to bring people to Bethesda. The president of Federal is also a committed art collector. Although the promoter is not an arts organization, they are working with arts groups to keep the focus on art.
Challenges Space is very tight in Bethesda. Despite a general terrorist alert the weekend of the show, it didnt seem to affect attendance. They find they get a lot of “overflows” from Reston. Laura runs the advertising side. The show budget is $180,000. Lauries challenge is to get the word out on very little and with little sponsorship in an expensive town where expenses continue to rise.

Ann Arbor Street Art Fair Shary Brown
Education – While the festivals education program is not well known, the new festival site will allow them to strengthen and improve artist demonstrations. They will also be able to better promote education programs through a new grant to bring art to after-school programs, low-income areas, senior citizen centers and small private schools, and to provide teacher training workshops to encourage kids to get interested and involved in art. Shary thanked Deborah Mae Broad for her grant writing assistance. Larry noted that NAIA wrote a letter in support of the grant, and would be happy to do similar things for other festivals.

Kansas City Plaza Art Fair Cassie Neustrom
9/11 – The impact of 9/11 two weeks before the festival greatly challenged the Plaza Art Fair last year, while they struggled whether to cancel the event. Despite many artist cancellations, they decided to hold it anyway and had very good results. They created the “Art with Heart” program which allowed artists to donate all or partial proceeds from a designated piece or pieces to the September 11th Fund and which brought great energy to the festival. In January 2002, ownership of the festival transferred to Highwood Properties, which has vowed to continue the festival.

Three Rivers Arts Festival Jennifer Zimmerman
Festival location and length – The Artist Market is only 1 of 5 components of the 17-day festival, and rotates 6 times during the festival, 150 artists at a time, creating a logistical nightmare. But somehow, it has worked out. TRAF is part of the Carnegie Institute, and was started 43 years ago by their Womens Club. However, there is concern whether the event is working for the time and site anymore, so Jennifer is pushing for change, with her main goal to make the festival shorter.
Emerging Artists – New this year is an Emerging Artists program where TRAF is offering free booth space for students or others who are looking for a career change into the arts.

Bayou City Art Festival Lynette Wallace
Two events – Bayous biggest challenge is to keep their two annual events the spring one in the park, and the fall one downtown separate in the minds of the public. The festival has 300 artists, childrens activities, food and NO large stages, and attracts a paid attendance audience of 70,000. Last year they raised $85,000, proceeds from which are split among 11 charities that help with the event.

Sun Valley Center Arts & Crafts Festival Heather Crocker
Their goal is to create a gathering place for people to enjoy art. Sun Valley is a good small show that attracts a lot of celebrities in the area. It is not a fundraising event for the Center, and does not have sponsorships. The show runs on a $50,000 budget, attracts 7,000 people to the free event, but generated over $400,000 in sales for its 130 artists.

Artigras North Palm Beach Chamber Brandy Upright
New location – Artigras moved to its new location in Jupiter, FL this year. It is an 18-year-old show, but Brandy is its first full-time director, and is in her third year with the show. Their budget has grown from $300,000 to $700,000, but they recently decreased the number of artists in the show. The gated event attracts 120,000 150,000 people. $1 of each ticket sold during pre-show ticket sales is donated to area schools.

Krasl Art Fair Sara Shambarger
Cancellations – Krasl is located in a resort community on Lake Michigan. Saras biggest challenge is the cancellation rate of artists. They have a generous cancellation policy, but are questioning whether that is the best practice. 41 artists have cancelled so far this year, so the show ends up being much different than that which was juried in. The event is the same weekend as 5 others (including Cain Park), and although they could consider changing dates, the art fair has a 41-year tradition of that weekend. (Bob Briscoe suggested contacting other shows on the same weekend to try to coordinate cancellation policies and dates.)

Agenda Topic: Successful Practices of the Small/Midsize Show
Presenter: Karla Prickett, Smoky Hill River Festival

Smoky Hill takes place in Salina, KS the same weekend as Chicagos Old Town. With a background as an artist and in Arts Education, Karla takes the artists perspective to the planning table for the festival.

Salina is located in the middle of Kansas at the intersection of highways, but is a strong cultural community with a progressive reputation in the arts. Smoky Hill is in its 25th year and is a project of the citys Arts & Humanities Commission. The 5 full-time A&H employees, 3 full-time festival coordinators and 2 part-time employees are paid by the city. The festival receives a lot of city support, which supplies all of its services. The recently retired Executive Director was a strong visionary who believed in multi-level experiences to help change lives and build community, and also does a lot of collaboration with other organizations.

In addition to the festival, the Commission has year-round projects, including:

  • Arts Infusion, which brings artists into the classroom
  • Preparing the regional Cultural Calendar, which also incorporates activities in other communities
  • Overseeing the local arts grants program
  • A poetry reading series
  • A public art program
  • Riverfest

Smoky Hill promotes education under a theme of “new, different and still the same”, as an expression of community identity and an expression of Salina. Everything is geared toward quality. The festival budget is $400,000 and designed to break even (no profit). Approx. 40% is raised from admission fees and merchandise sales. Everything is juried even food. Although not many local artists are juried in, local artists have many other opportunities. Salina is a hub for many people in surrounding communities and is very arts-based year round. It is a gated event ($6-adv, $8 at gate, kids free) in a large park overlooking the Smoky River. The festival is marketed to arts patrons in Kansas City, Wichita, Topeka & Nebraska, and brings in 85-95,000 people more than the population of Salina for a day-long experience of the art show, entertainment, kids activities and stages.

They have 2 juried shows: Fine Art, and Craft (which includes folk art and contemporary). 24% of their 93 artists are invited from award winners, contenders for awards, and some special Director invitations.

Smoky River weighs audience and artist evaluations heavily in planning the festival. Since they share their event weekend with events in Chicago, Columbus, etc., they think closely about their marketing. Audience evaluation forms are in programs and on the web site; artists report their total sales at checkout in order to retrieve their slides; eval forms (and AFSB cards) are mailed out right after the festival.

When artist evaluations showed that craft artists wanted a 3-day show, but fine artists only wanted a 2-day show, the festival developed incentives to create a balance for the fine art artists, including increased awards and a patron program that is exclusive to the fine arts show. In 7 years, the program has 270 patrons and has doubled sales for fine artists.

The patron program offers:

  • An invitation to a gourmet breakfast (supplied by the country club and paid for by 8 – $500 contributors), complete with musicians, etc.
  • Admission to the show an hour before opening
  • Convenient parking ? Assistance in carrying purchases
  • An “Arts Patron” button to wear, and cards for patrons to give to artists for display when the patron purchases an artwork
  • The patron pledges to purchase at least $250 in artwork (festival receives no commission or other benefit)

Karla presented a slide show of the event. Slide highlights included:

  • Artist installations: yearly competition, artists receive stipends
  • Wrapped trees: A yearly theme is chosen and 30 trees in park are “wrapped” by artists
  • Sand sculpture: Sand sculpture brought to “another level”; sculptures made and then painted
  • Stages: 4 stages that are decorated with work by local artists
  • Project Bandaloo: A special ambient performing group brought in (expensive) for the festivals 25th anniversary celebration.
  • Roving entertainment
  • Childrens Arts Area: free activities, including a parade on the last day
  • Artisan Demo Areas: scheduled demonstrations
  • Poetry Wall: patrons make poetry from words on a wall
  • “First Treasures”: an art-buying opportunity for young collectors ($1 – $5 artwork)

Smoky River takes pride in its artist hospitality, including:

  • Volunteers who circulate with water, coffee, etc. for artists
  • A “red card” for artists to display on their tents when assistance is needed
  • Set up & teardown assistance by high school wrestling team (festival pays school $650 for assistance)
  • Reasonable fees: booth – $250, jury – $15
  • Free & close-in parking for artists
  • Artist reception Friday evening after set up
  • Artist breakfast on Sunday a.m., and 2 snack bags of oranges, apples, crackers, etc. per day
  • Lodging discounts
  • Unique awards presentation to artists using a “fife & drum” group

Larry thanked Karla for the excellent presentation and noted that its nice to know that small shows do things so well!

Agenda Topic: Emergency Resources/Assistance for Artists CERF
Presenter: Cornelia Cary, CERF

Cornelia expressed how much she has enjoyed the conference and how impressed she is at the director-attendees focus on art and artists.

While artists have always seemed to band together and “pass the hat” to help one another out with emergency situations, the Craft Emergency Relief Fund (CERF) began in 1985 when an artist suffered a significant fire and 3 artists decided to formally raise money for an emergency fund. CERFs mission is to help sustain craftmaking as a livelihood and to try to keep craft artists at work. In the years since, CERF has given to over 400 artists in need. Over 50% of donations come from artists; funding also comes from foundations, shows, etc.

Currently, CERFs financial services include:

  • Loans
    • Quick Loans: up to $3,500 no-interest loans to be paid back within 2 years
    • Phoenix Loans: larger business loans up to $8,000
    • Grant Program: up to $1,000 for people who dont want to take out loans
  • Discounts on craft supplies and equipment
  • Fee Waivers for booth fees, etc.

CERF sometimes also operates as a “cyber-pass of the hat” for individual donations and support, such as the assistance provided recently to Ken Loeber.

CERF is looking to expand beyond emergency relief to emergency prevention, and is seeking partnerships to develop business and health insurance packages. They recently received an NEA grant to create a resource referral program to identify and access resources. Although CERF was established to help craft artists, it is moving toward helping any artists in any medium. It is currently a non-membership organization. (Cornelia suggested looking at the Visual Artists Hotline to locate current assistance to fine art artists.)

CERF seeks to establish partnerships with shows and festivals:

  • Why? Where would any of us be without artists?
  • How? Ideas include:
    • Business Membership Program: “Lend a Hand” program described in CERF brochure o Booth fee waivers: Some shows waive fees for artists approved by CERF
    • Host special events
    • Host booth fee raffles: $5 raffle tickets in artist registration packages to receive booth fee refund
    • Application check-offs: A checkbox on show applications to donate $3 to CERF
    • Pleas: pleas in registration packages to contribute to CERF when they have a good show.
  • Whats in it for the show?
  • Mention in ads in trade publications that list support to CERF
  • Recognition in CERF newsletter published two times yearly
  • Recognition on CERF website

Pamela Hill noted that, “CERF is the ultimately respected organization for craft artists.” She sometimes uses the tagline of “CERFs a member” when trying to get craft artists to join NAIA.

Discussion opened up to the attendees:

Mo (Des Moines) and Carol (Coconut Grove) pledged $250 to CERF; Rick Nugent pledged $100; Shary (Ann Arbor) also committed to pledge.

Shary noted that Ann Arbor has a generous emergency withdrawal and emergency refund policy, but it would be helpful to have a set of criteria to help evaluate need. Can CERF help? Could CERF review, evaluate and help make decisions?

Larry noted that CERF could be an alternate to the shows giving aid to individuals.

Cornelia said CERF could urge support for an individual artist, but could only give them the maximum under CERF programs. Perhaps she could write an article for the NAIA newsletter that discusses how CERF makes its decisions.

George (Krasl) asked whether artists usually have personal business insurance to cover their inventory. Cornelia replied that only 7% have inventory insurance; even less hold business interruption insurance.

Cornelia urged everyone to fill out the sign-up forms in the conference package to support CERF.

Open discussionTopic: Artist Demonstrations

Shary: Has learned it is better to have the demo area by the artists booth to provide context. The new AA site will have opportunities for demo stages, but she is learning its hard to get an artist to leave their booth for 2 hours.
Cynthia: Demos are great and attract public, but better to keep close to booths, or within eyesight, and to have knowledgeable boothsitters.

Connie: What is the attraction for artists to demo?
Susan: Public loves it, but need to be in the traffic flow Karla: Bought 2 wireless mikes for artists it made a big difference in audience interest and ability to hear
Rick: “An educated audience is a better audience.” And education is an NAIA goal.

Carole: Coconut Grove doesnt do demos because of the size of the crowds, but does an “artists in the schools” program before and after festival. If artists do demo on site, do they bring their own materials and supplies?
Bob: Ask artist in advance.
Larry: The Coconut Grove school program is very rewarding, even if tough to do. NAIA has Douglas Adams program outline he created that it could make available.

Sarah: Likes the idea of presenting an artist slide show, since she cant do demos because of equipment required.
Karla: Smoky Rivers demo area is under a “shelter house” where 10-15 artists demo near their displays. Demo artists are not in Fine Art or Craft shows, though.
Deborah Mae: But does that promote sales for show artists?

Jennifer: TRAF is giving arts guilds in Pittsburgh tents in the market to do demos, but not sell.

Susan: St. James has gotten sponsors for demos. Demos will be set up in the food area.

Shary: Other thoughts:

  • Create demos that could travel to other shows? (Maybe through an NAIA program?)
  • Have demos be an indoor component; or
  • Work through a docent program, such as the UofM Art Museum.

Larry: An issue is how to do demos without interfering with other artists.

Bob: Other ideas:

  • Have someone introduce demos and provide a history of the process; also, be prepared to ask artist questions to stimulate interchange
  • Maybe a “team approach” with other artists?
  • Artists do a 15-minute talk in their booths
  • Show provide a formal slide presentation, and have someone do critical comments/critiques.

Pamela: ACC shows have “walking tours” of booths.

Sara: Cherry Creek had a tent for auction bidding on computer. Could something similar work for demos?

Open Discussion Topic: Donations of Artwork

Susan: How can shows continue to do auctions, but get artists to donate quality work and get tax deductions?
Pamela: Biggest concern is that auctions undervalue artists work rarely auctions for more than the value. Issue for artists is not that they dont want to help, but there is a limit.
Connie: When Arts, Beats & Eats asks an artist to donate a work, they get a jury-exemption invitation for the following year. Auction procedure: a silent auction event the week before the event with a $100 ticket; artwork auctioned as part of a “package” with dinner, champagne, etc.

George: As a consultant, he is offended when people ask him to give of his time since it is not fair to paying customers; thinks the situation is similar for artists.

Don: In Kentucky, laws have changed. New law has an art donation category that allows the FMV of artwork if there is an appraisal and the piece is at least 6 months old. So maybe a national change is on the way.

Pamela: Suggests shows think of alternatives to auctions. Example: Artist agrees to donate a percentage of the purchase price of an artwork when the work is sold.

Larry: Discussed Gasparillas “Festival ArtBucks”: a corporate sponsor allows a customer to purchase a $100 certificate for $90. Customer uses certificate to buy art, but artist gets the full $100 upon cashing in the certificate. The sponsoring corporation gets recognition for the 10% donation.

Shary: Has learned privately that other organizations go through the Ann Arbor show and solicit donations directly from artists for various projects. How do we let artists know that the practice is not sanctioned by AASAF? Could put something in artist packages, but if the soliciting organizations tell the media that donations went down because AA told artists not to donate, AA will look bad.
Don: Even if the show director tells the artist that refusing to donate will not affect their standing in the show, artists are still concerned.

Toni: Referred to a discussion on the NAIA forum: An artist was asked by show to donate a work, but the smallest piece she had was $700. Offered to give show $100 cash instead, but was turned down. Disassembled the piece to give a donation valued at $300. Was sold at auction for $30.

Beth: At end of Lakefront auction, all artists are given lists of the bid amounts.

Susan: Have seen auction buyers go back to the artists booth and buy more work from artist.

Mo: Shows need to challenge ourselves to find something else to auction that wont “bite the hand that feeds us.”

Open Discussion Topic: Artist Hospitality

Carol: What kind of hospitality do artists expect? (Coconut Groves hospitality costs them $42,000 each year.)
Bob: Extremely grateful and appreciative of efforts, but rarely takes advantage of hospitality. His sense is that shows think artists expect it as a form of “entitlement”. Would prefer to see that money go toward promotion or having booth fee lowered.
Rick: Water is nice, but not necessary to overdo hospitality.
Toni: Would be nice if it didnt cost festival cash, but could be an in-kind donation from someone.

Larry: Artists do appreciate hospitality it is a very tangible perk. Putting the money into promotion instead doesnt feel like a tangible perk. Bringing some food and water around is deeply appreciated.

Jennifer: TRAFs artist survey shows artists value free parking and a better breakfast over advertising. Larry: Majority of artists are not cognizant of all the shows have to do to put on the show. When an artist is tired and hungry, the perks are very tangible.

Sara: Krasl could never match what CGAF does. Although they cant do much, they do have volunteers who will bend over backwards to help. One reason to try to increase sponsorship is to increase artist amenities.

Rick: It is just nice to have the basics. But once a show establishes certain basics, can a show ever pull back without complaining?

Karla: Last year, NAIA survey picked Smoky River as #1 in hospitality, but the question for the shows is: what works best for you?

Toni: Need for hospitality sometimes depends on what else is available in area restaurants or food booths. Also, if hospitality food is really bad and a show director wouldnt eat it, neither will the artists.

Brandi: Some events are able to arrange with food vendors to give discounts to artists.

Laurie: Bethesda has started delivering bagels and coffee to artists because too crowded for artists to get it themselves.

Larry: St. Louis delivers box lunches. Artists select from a menu at registration.

Connie: Bill Charney was once told: Not every artist will make money at your show, so make it as hospitable as possible to make us happy and attract us back.

Carole: Surveys (including NAIA’s) seem to come back with comments that are unrealistic.
Rick: NAIA will be revisiting their survey format.
Karla: Survey comment may mean that only one artist is disgruntled.
Carole: But the shows Board of Directors reads the survey and it looks bad to them.
Sara: Krasl doesnt change a policy unless 10 people make the same comment.

Heather: It would be helpful to have information from shows re: exactly what they provide to artists.

Larry summarized the discussion: Try to figure out the minimum fundamental needs that are important to artists. If you make a claim to provide certain hospitality, you should follow through on it. Anything above that claimed is a nice perk, but not really necessary.

Open Discussion Topic: Reproductions

Laurie (Bethesda) questioned how to spot reproductions and how best to enforce rules?
Mo: Des Moines has an expert on staff that goes through the show constantly (accompanied by an attorney). If a problem is spotted, artist is given a grievance report. They have different grievance reports for
different situations. (Mo will share grievance report with attendees.)
Shary
: AASAF has incident reports that they require the complainants and artists to sign. She gives lots of warnings and gentle reprimands, and never goes alone to talk to an artist.
Lynette: Arlington has a policy that if an artist has repros, they must be labeled as such, and can only be displayed in a certain way.

Larry: Noted that NAIA has been accused of being anti-reproduction. He stated that the NAIA does not advocate any position regarding the inclusion of reproductions, but does explain and educate about process. The NAIA also stresses that shows should enforce whatever rules they put in place. “When you enforce something, word travels like wildfire. Likewise, when you dont enforce, word travels like wildfire.”

Cindy: In order to enforce, shows need to have validation of rule breaking.
Rick: Used to carry a catalog of glass bevels to help identify rule breaking.
Mo: Has asked artists to allow a studio visit if there is a question.
Larry: Reminded directors and artists that NAIA has no intention of being the “art police”

Heather: How could a show visit an artists studio if it is not near the show? Bill Charney suggested the artist send a video to show their creation of the work, but a video wont show production studios.
Larry: NAIA also has category advisors that can assist.

Susan: What should a show do if an artist claims another artist has “stolen” their designs, techniques, etc.?
Ardath: The show shouldnt get involved. That is an issue between the artists only.
Karla: Also notice many instances where artists are “influenced” by anothers work, but not exactly “copying” them.

Open Discussion Topic: Good Ideas from other Events

Attendees recognized some good ideas they have noted about other events, including:

  • Booth layouts on festival web sites
  • Post artist acceptances (and wait list) on line the quicker artists know, the better
  • Project artist slides at the Artist Dinner
  • Artist awards as a public ceremony
  • Shows that send out receipt confirmation cards when applications are received
  • Include list of other accepted artists with acceptance letters.
  • Provide juror comments about the quality of applicants slides

Open Discussion Topic: Targeting Your Audience in Show Promotion

Larry: The biggest concern of artists is that the number of people that attend your event is not as important as that the RIGHT people attend, and that the right message is sent to the media.
Cindy: Uptown did an exit survey of customers. Now have good demographic study that shows a good art-buying community attends. Ended up changing media stations to one more interested in art in order to reach the new demographic
Lynette: Upper Arlington sends out newsletters 3 times/year
Larry: Artists are beginning to use e-mail lists for show announcements. Shows could do that, too, and provide links to their web sites.
Sara: Krasl has a new marketing firm that did an analysis on how to attract buyers
Bob: Perhaps shows could advertise in one anothers programs and “cross-pollinate” since people do take vacations around art shows.

Open Discussion Topic: Merger of NAIA Conference/IFEA Visual Arts Affinity Group? and next NAIA Conference

Larry noted that NAIA has been invited to make presentations during a special VAA session at IFEA (International Festivals and Events Association) since 1997. He questioned whether the session is helpful to show directors, or is there a better way?
Cindy: IFEA started in the parade industry. It is expensive to attend, but includes everything from operations to security to trade shows. When at IFEA, she doesnt want to go to VAA because she wants to attend the other events.
Shary: Attending VAA requires that you miss something else. VAA also requires that someone volunteer to handle the planning since IFEA staff does not direct it.
Lynette: IFEA is so big that there is no close communication. The NAIA conference is better.

Larry: Questions:
1. Are annual NAIA conferences something that show directors want?
2. Are annual conferences something that NAIA wants to take on?
3. Is it important to directors to have an NAIA conference around a citys festival?

Shary: Perhaps overlap an NAIA Members Conference with a Show Directors Conference.
Don: Artist surveys indicate aritsts would like access to show directors.
Mo: Suggested picking one expert from each association (IFEA, International Downtown Assn, etc.) to come to the NAIA conference.
Beth: Need to consider whether pulling the VAA away from IFEA would create a sensitive issue.
Bob: NAIA membership needs to have its own conference to address some issues, but would be good to have some combination with show directors.
Larry: Only Board members, category advisors and show directors invited to present conference in order to provide reasonable and efficient dynamics. And since artists pay for expenses from their own pockets, it might be tougher to get more artists to attend or to open it up to a larger audience.
Karla: Value of NAIA conference is the dialogue between shows, but also to have communication with artists. Doesnt go to IFEA because so formal.
Bob: An NAIA membership conference would include both artists and contributing members, and would set up interactive programs between artists and shows.

Toni: Would be helpful for present attendees to let NAIA know what you would like, and whether the present conference is helpful to directors.
Mo: “Ive got reams of TO DOs to follow up on after this conference!”

Bob: What would be the advantage of having 100 artists attend conferences?
Karla: It would show artists that we care.

Larry: Would like feedback from show directors and jot down what they want communicated to artists. “The more artists understand you care, the more tolerant they will be when perhaps something doesnt go well.”

Shary: What would be the goals of a combined conference? Would like to encourage some long-range visioning to become a collective force in our culture, such as: How to impact communities throughout the year? Any “bricks & mortar” activities we can do? What more as an industry can we do?

Karla: What can shows do to help artists who have never done an art show before?
Larry: Lynn Whipple will be posting information for new artists on NAIA web site. To directors: Will you make a list of questions that new artists ask?
Bob: The art fair industry is still “sneered at” by many. A long term goal: to get universities to validate art fairs as a viable art profession. Universities can be a source of the next-generation artists. (The “emerging” v. “submerging” artists!)

Shary: Would like to see festivals linked nationally (perhaps through NAIA), and create a template so shows dont have to reinvent the wheel. Perhaps create a national campaign.
Larry: (Ken Huff is exploring the possibility of a web site page for art fair consumers.)

Ideas for national campaigns:

  • Billboards
  • Media promotions
  • Travel destination points (ex: through airline magazines)
  • Television shows (Connie noted that Lynette Jennings has done a series at arts festivals)

Lisa: Would like to have more category presentations (like Deborah Maes)

Future conference dates/location thoughts:
Member Conference: 3rd weekend in January, with a separate breakout day for directors to deal with more logistical matters, but still allow members to attend.
Show Director Conference: August 2003 in Minneapolis.

A huge thanks was given to Toni for all of her incredible organization in planning and making the conference happen. Although Tonis Board term ends in September, she has offered to stay on in the meeting capacity because she believes it is so important.

Thanks, Toni!! Thanks, Larry!!

Notes prepared by Ardath Prendergast

Janet Parke

ARTIST INFORMATION

The medium in which I work is Fractal Art — a genre of Digital Art. My studio is my computer screen, and I use specialized mathematical formulas as my paints and brushes. Each element of my image — shape, color, texture, light, and shadow — is controlled by these formulas and I, in turn, control the formulas by manipulating their parameters and numeric values. I form each image with a collage of fractal layers that merge and interact to create the finished work.

Once a work is completed, it is rendered at the appropriate size and printed in continuous tone on photographic paper. Unlike other digital art and photography which lose resolution the larger they are printed, a work of fractal art can be rendered in any size without losing resolution. Because the fractal is re-calculated each time it is rendered, there is no loss of detail as the image is enlarged. In fact, the inverse is true — the larger the rendering (or print), the greater and more intricate its structural detail.

As an artist with a background in music and dance, I am inspired by their common elements — the rhythmic repetition of the fractal shape, the graceful, sweeping curves and spirals of color, the dramatic use of texture and light.

UPCOMING ART FESTIVALS

  • Main Street Arts Festival, Fort Worth, TX, April 7-10, 2005 (booth #463)
  • Gatlinburg Fine Arts Festival, Gatlinburg, TN, May 21-22, 2005
  • 57th Street Art Fair, Chicago, IL, June 4-5, 2005 (booth #408)
  • Covington Art Fair, Fort Wayne, IN, June 18-19, 2005
  • Krasl Art Fair, St. Joseph, MI, July 9-10, 2005 (booth #117)
  • Orchard Lake Fine Art Show, Orchard Lake, MI, August 5-7, 2005
  • Midwest Salute to the Arts, Fairview Heights, IL, August 26-28, 2005
  • Art & Apples Festival, Rochester, MI, September 9-11, 2005
  • ‘You Gotta Have Park’ Festival, Memphis, TN, October 22, 2005

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS

  • Echoes of Infinity, solo exhibition, Levy Gallery, Buckman Fine Arts Center, Memphis, Tennessee, 2004
  • Bridges: Mathematical Connections in Visual Art, Holtzman Art Gallery — Towson University, Towson, Maryland, 2002
  • Digital Creation Awards 5th Anniversary Exhibition, Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, Tokyo, Japan, 2001
  • 2001.1 Digital Salon, Stele Gallery, Las Cruces, New Mexico, 2001
  • The Frontier Between Art and Science, Granada, Valladolid, and Salamanca, Spain; Lyon and Anglet, France; Buenos Aires, La Plata, and Resistencia, Argentina; Belgrade, Yugoslavia; Vienna, Austria; Tokyo, Japan; 2000-present
  • Infinite Art — Painting With Numbers, Jack Kenner Gallery, Memphis, Tennessee, 2000
  • Elysium, solo exhibition, Levy Gallery, Buckman Fine Arts Center, Memphis, Tennessee, 1999

AWARDS

  • Award of Excellence, Toray Digital Creation Awards, 2000

COLLECTIONS

  • SOS/ACORN, Memphis, Tennessee

 

“At The Show” Tips – Add yours!

(Sorry, due to spammers, ShowTips has been taken offline…)

From: Beth Warner E-Mail: Date: 3/13/05, 5:15 PM
    205.188.117.10

Greetings!
Until recently, when packing up my canopy poles I was unzipping my entire pole carrying bag, placing the poles into the totally opened unzipped bag. I am tired at the end of shows yet eager to get packed and going. This method seldom worked well because the poles I initially placed into the opened unzipped bag had the nasty habit of escaping. They would roll out of the bag, get tangled up with other poles or with the lines I keep attached to the poles for my weights. I hate having to repeat tasks. Finally one weary afternoon I stopped in the middle of this insanity. I then examined what I was doing and discovered the mistake I was making and the reason for this inefficient method. I have solved the problem. I no longer unzip the entire bag. Instead when packing the poles I keep the bag zipped up and only unzip it a little. This way the poles have no means of escape and remain in the bag, not rolling around. It really works.
Hope this helps anyone out there who is tired and finds that they are still chasing poles around.

From: Flourish Company E-Mail: Date: 2/15/05, 11:53 AM
    66.82.9.59

Attention All Craft Hut Owners: Newton Displays has closed their doors. Flourish Company, makers of the Trimline Canopy, has taken over the Craft Hut and we’re working to support the needs of all current Craft Hut customers. We will also be offering new Craft Huts for sale just as soon as we complete the transfer of equipment and processes from Newton’s in Ft Myers, Florida to Flourish in St. Paul, Arkansas.
You can call us at the old Craft Hut number (800-678-8677)or at the Flourish number (800-296-0049). You may look forward to full support for your Craft Hut with Flourish Company’s best-in-the-business service. We hope to have a Craft Hut page added to our website very soon.

From: Carol Boucher E-Mail: Date: 10/5/04, 5:59 PM
    12.75.109.133

Below is a link to a good source for battery operated booth lighting. I purchased my track lights from them, though they are wired for plug in use. I can adapt them for use with batteries if needed. http://eclecticlighting.homestead.com/LS1KIT.html

From: Beth Warner E-Mail: Date: 7/6/04, 8:46 AM
    64.12.116.6

Canopy folding is tough to do when you do shows solo and have only one pair of hands. I have discovered that it becomes easier to fold up the roof section of my Show Off canopy by keeping this roof section partially clipped on to the framework. I release the clips that secure the roof section at the sides, front and rear corners and then fold the roof section into one third its size using the framework for support. This helps when the weather is foul and you are squeezed into a booth space that measures 10 x 10 exactly.

From: E-Mail: Date:

 

From: Jodi Walsh E-Mail: Date: 10/5/03, 4:50 PM
    66.44.106.50

ARTISTS’ MUSEUM
406 7TH Street NW
Washington DC 20004
202-638-7001 [email protected]

SECOND ANNUAL – ALL MEDIA – JANUARY JURIED SHOW

January 4 – 20, 2004

Deadline: Friday, November 26, 2003

The Artists’ Museum gallery, located in Washington DC’s 7th Street Gallery District, is pleased to announce the call for entries for the Second Annual All Media Juried Show. The gallery encourages all types of media including installation work, oil, fiber, watercolor, ceramics, glass drawings, 3D, mixed media, acrylic, photography, etc.

Juror: Nancy Palmer, Associate Professor, Corcoran College of Art & Design. Trained as an art historian, she is also a painter, printmaker, installation artists and jewelry designer. Her work is exhibited in the United States and abroad, is in the collections at the White House, University of Virginia and the Portland Art Museum.

Award: Solo exhibition of one-month duration.

To review the prospectus and obtain an entry form please visit our website: www.artistsmuseum.com.

Have a creative day.

Jodi Walsh
Director

From: Chris P. E-Mail: Date: 7/14/03, 11:53 AM
    67.40.133.122

To make life a bit easier, build yourself an art show survival kit. Use an old tackle box or canvas bag and stuff it full of things you need to hang your show. Put whatever you find necessary in the kit, extra hanging wire, sold stickers, business cards, standard tools, gum, small first aid kit, receipt book, guest book, whatever! It saves a lot of running around and worrying the day of the exhibit.

From: Meredith Kuntzsch E-Mail: Date: 3/19/03, 9:40 AM
    205.188.209.82

To all art fair artists: BEWARE OF NEWTON DISPLAYS…aka CRAFT HUT! Their customer service and product quality has severely declined and much to the detriment of the artist/customer. Case in point: I dropped off my canopy top on Tuesday, March 11 in Ft. Myers for a simply retrofit of a zipper for a back awning attachment. I indicated that I needed the canopy top to be shipped to me in Houston, TX in time to set up for the Bayou City spring show which starts Friday, March 20. They said it was absolutely “no problem” and that the retrofit took no time at all and that they understood totally my need for the top to arrive in a timely fashion. I reiterated this numerous times and had them repeat back the information. On Tuesday, March 18 I called Craft Hut to find out when the top was to arrive. Amazingly they said it was scheduled to arrive the Monday AFTER the Bayou City show. Of course I freaked out! I explained to them the problem with this and their error. Ann, the owner of the company indicated that she didn’t believe me that I was even in on the 11th because her staff didn’t even push the paperwork on the order through until late Friday of that week….4 days after I’d been there. She flat out refused to send the top to me in time for the set up. Flat out refused. She mumbled, grumbled, refused to answer or even speak (silent treatment) when I asked her what she was thinking. She acted like a petulant child. Today, Wednesday, March 19, I called Craft Hut again and spoke with the staff. The woman I spoke with (name not mentioned) admitted the writing on the order was hers and that she takes full responsibility and admitted it was Craft Hut’s mistake! I asked her if she was actually admitting for the record that this was THEIR mistake and should they not have simply fixed their mistake by shipping the top to me in time for the show. She said yes.

BOTTOM LINE: We as artists need to be aware of these companies who refuse to spend a simple $80 to fix a mistake. This affects our lives and our businesses and should in turn affect THEIR BUSINESSES! We need to vote with our dollars and use our common sense in dealing with such poor suppliers with such outrageous lack of business ethics!!!!!

From: Susan Sheehan E-Mail: Date: 9/1/02, 7:13 AM
    24.198.30.188

Hand Sanitizer – After setting up I always feel the need to wash my hands but don’t always feel the need to visit the local porta-potty. It is also a great thing to offer the parent with the sticky fingered child. I have no problem with children touching but often the parent wants them to refrain because of dirty hands. Problem solved!

From: Karen Kinser E-Mail: Date: 8/31/02, 11:13 PM
    68.10.225.61

One of the best “show toys” I EVER got was a small “banquet” table, from Costco/Sam’sClub . . . for $35. Peter, from Florida, had one at the Naples show a couple of years ago and I thought it was the handiest thing to have behind a booth! So, since he wouldn’t sell me his (!) . . . I had to run to Sam’s before Gasparilla, and buy one!
You can keep all your VISA stuff handy . . . gives clients a real place to put their belongings while signing on the dotted line . . . and it’s somewhere to safely pack the paintings that are just streaming out of your booth! I am lost without it, now, at those awful awful shows that make us back our tents up to one another. I much prefer the little office behind my booth!

From: Brittany E-Mail: Date: 7/23/01, 12:04 AM
    63.95.84.37

Play soft music in the back ground, spread sparkles on the table, dress in costume and people will wander towards you, trying to find out what’s happening. Demonstrate how you make the stuff, how it works, or if you can’t do any of that set up a TV (if you have electricity there) and show a vidio of that.

From: Cyd LaBonte E-Mail: Date: 1/14/01, 10:31 AM
    63.70.202.24

Just one word — Velcro! If you have carpet covered panels, use a small piece of the hook side of stick-on velcro on the back corner of a frame. the hooks will grab the carpet fibers and stablize the artwork on the wall. Also use it to hang lightweight signs, card holders, curtains, and to keep tablecloths in place. i even use it in the “office” in back of the booth to hang frequently used tools, like my calculator on the wall. Its a good thing!

From: Lisa Schulman Larsen E-Mail: Date: 5/2/00, 4:42 PM
    156.46.27.75

The first one that comes to mind is the return address label I put on every little receipt I give out with every purchase. I also put one of computer made business cards into every bag with every purchase. The card has my name and address as well as 2-4 images of my work in case they forget what the card is for they can see the image and say, ” oh yeah, the women with the cool beaded stuff from the art fair “, or something like that.Suzanne Gentes

From: Ginny Herzog E-Mail: Date: 5/1/00, 11:04 PM
    209.19.172.55

Comments: To remember important show dates, purchase a dry erase board and asst.
colored markers. Make a chart with boxes indicating: show dates, applications deadline date, notification date, special deadlines (fees, vendors license), hotel reservation made. Keep it in the studio.

 

 

TRAVELING ON THE ROAD

Found a great mechanic? Send the info to us! Don’t forget: name, address, phone, contact person if available.

If you have discovered honesty and value on the road let your fellow artists know! Well, I’ll start this off with …oh, how about Rock Springs, Wyoming? The place is Metric Motors (exit 107 off I-80) and while he could easily have taken me for an engine rebuild after overheating several times somewhere between Dinosaur National Monument and Rock Springs, (“This doesn’t look good, it could mean $3500 give or take”) instead replaced the water pump…and that’s all! He also was expeditious and we got back home to Boise with no problem – the ol’ van (Toyota) is up to 180,000 now and still going strong. (sad to say it’s at the junkyard now!)

If you have a similiar tale of mechanical goodness (your hometown mechanic!) send it to me and I will post them here verbatim and randomly. Go here to print out an organized list. I would also like to collect tales of woe unless it is just too painful. I assume all submissions will be on the up an’ up.
Submitted by Michael Hamilton

CarTalk’s Mechan-X-Files
If you’ve listened to Tom and Ray Magliozzi (aka “Click and Clack, The Tappet Brothers”) on NPR you’ll love their website. Here is their mechanics database for the entire country.

VISITOR SUBMISSIONS:


NORTOWN TIRE AND SERVICE
1400 West North Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622
773-276-9838
I have a great recommendation for you. We were on our way into Chicago to do an art show on the Kennedy Expressway 90/94, I think is the name of the highway. My husband realized something was wrong with our van, the brake pedal was very soft and he thought we were loosing our brakes or had limited brakes. Fortunately we were in stop and go traffic. We got off on North Avenue and there was a garage right there. It was 2:30 Friday afternoon, they got us in right away and were very knowledgeable.

Our van is old, the brakes were like new, but the brakes were frozen on and it had something to do with contaminated brake fluid, in the heat the fluid was boiling and burning, we could smell something burning. an Hour and one half later we were on our way.

In talking to others in the very nice waiting area I felt as if we were fortunate to have found this place. It was a husband and wife running it. Their family has a second place on North Avenue also. They sell tires etc. in addition to auto repair. So far it seems to have fixed the problem. We drove to do the show and then home again. The people were nice also, that always helps.
Submitted by Linda Steinworth, June 2007

Phibbs Auto Service
215 Agnes Rd
Knoxville, TN 37919-6309
865-588-3678
I have dealt with this company for 10 years. I have never had an issue of bad or incomplete service. They are trustworthy and easy to deal with: that is the mechanics. They have gone out of their way to explain their work. I feel that I have spent my money wisely there.
Submitted by Michael Krooss


If you ever break down on Long Island, East Neck Auto Service Inc. at 295 Little E. Neck Road, Babylon, New York has 24 hour emergency service. Call John Careccia at 631/321-7434. The man takes good care of my 1990 Bronco which gets me to my shows, as well as the more conventional family vehicle.
Submitted by Dianne Matus


Jackson’s Complete Auto Care
660 W. 6th Ave.
Eugene, OR 97402
541-344-7366
1-800-258-7344
They are very honest and conscientious. They have worked on both my Ford and Chevy. When they couldn’t figure something out, they’d call the local dealer mechanics and come up with a solution. Though they don’t work on the diesel engine, they work on everything else. What they can’t do, I trust their recommendations.
Tell them Adrienne sent you.
Submitted by Adrienne Adam


In El Cerrito, California, near Berkeley, Albany, and Richmond, is:
R.C. Imports
6501 Fairmount Ave, 94530
510-526-8084
Daniel Santos, Prop.
One of the nicest guys in the world, would do anything for you, personal friend.
Submitted by Jan Etre


Miller’s Auto Repair
994 Blanding Blvd.
Suite 116
Orange Park, Florida 32065
904-213-1180
The owner was very nice. I received a quote for over $1000.00 and they repaired my Ford Tarus for $480.00. Just thought I would pass this along.
Submitted by “Tammy”


I would highly recommend Curtis Hi Tech in Asheville. They are honest, fast and do not overcharge. While they are specialists in tires/breaks and general maintenance, they could recommend a specialist your cars needs. Here is their info…
Curtis Hi Tech
1225 Tunnel Rd
Asheville, NC 28805
828-298-1428
Submitted by Chantal Saunders


Here is our mechanic in central Indiana. This is a competent, honest and thorough diagnostic service center. Highly recommended.
Master Tech Auto Service
1927 S. Curry Pike
Bloomington, IN 47403
Tel: 812-330-0364
Submitted by Jon Hecker


Neat idea! Last summer my transmission went out in Lexington, KY. Excellent mechanic in Lake Wales, FL:
Sorenson Chev
Hwy 27
863-676-7671
Submitted by Maija Baynes


In the northern Atlanta area I have used Roswell Auto for the last 14 years. They are honest and able to handle a variety of problems.
770-992-1962 or 3 – ask for Carl or Robert.
Submitted by Gordon Bruno


I live in Ann Arbor, a lot of artists come through here from time to time. 2 impeccably honest and superb shops.

Professional Automotive Technicians
1225 Jewett
Ann Arbor, MI, 48104
734-665-9707
Mike Bittenbinder

Illi’s Auto Service (Ray)
401 w. Huron
Ann Arbor,MI, 48103
734-665-5011
Submitted by Bradley Cross

A couple of nods to:
Mike at Briarwood Amaco
3230 South State Street Ann Arbor MI48104
734-761-9494

Directly across State from the entrance to the Sheraton/Courtyard.


I really like Roger at Earlysville Auto outside of Charlottesville, VA. He’s located on Route 743, also called Earlysville Road, in the center of Earlysville, just northwest of the Charlottesville airport. He’s good and honest, but always has a large backlog of work, so he’s not fast.
Submitted by Matthew Crane


I’ve been going to Imperial Auto Service since about 1985. It has been owned continuously by the same three fellows, two brothers and a friend. I’ve always felt that they are honest, trustworthy and knowledgeable–never had to bring something back a second time.
Imperial Auto Service
2344 Dexter Road (just east of Maple Rd.)
Ann Arbor, MI 48103
734-761-3888
Submitted by Diane Aronoff

Second Opinion:
Actually, I went by your recommendation and did not have a good experience. I recently had my car repaired at Imperial Auto Service in Ann Arbor, MI. The distributor on my civic had died and I had to have the car towed there. They fixed the car, but charged me $400 for a rebuild when Honda sells the part new for $330 and a rebuild kit for $160. This is the first time that I have felt I would have gotten a better deal at the dealership. They also had unreliable hours. In summary, very unprofessional.
Submitted by Michael Rajala


This is a local shop, as the name suggests, they handle mostly Toyotas, but also other Japanese vehicles.
Mostly Toyotas
253 Biltmore Ave.
Asheville, NC 28801
828-253-4981
Submitted by Ray Jones

~~~~~~~~~~~~

Having noticed that Mostly Toyotas of Asheville, NC has made it to the Good Mechanics List, I felt compelled to share my experience on the flip side of the coin. I am the owner of a Toyota vehicle, and took it to Mostly Toyotas only once, having made the decision based on that single encounter that I would not give future business to this outfit. I initially felt that I was not given full respect, being female, which has not been an issue for me in many years. I was more than willing to work around this matter however, until a check of my oil upon the return of the vehicle showed that I had been charged for my requested oil change without the service having been provided. I called back to explain the situation, figuring that the shop had been particularly busy and the detail of the oil change overlooked. The woman that I spoke with insisted that the oil HAD been changed, and defended that in older cars, the oil becomes dirty more quickly than in newer cars. (My car is 11 years old.) This was the day after my oil had allegedly been changed, and the oil was the same jet black I had brought it is as, having been already overdue for a change, and down a quart. (I have a slow oil leak, and the car takes an ½ quart of oil with each gas fill up, about 300 miles.) She did eventually agree to look at the vehicle if I would bring it back, but gave me a date a week and a half in the future, and was so grudging of the concession that I did not feel comfortable returning my vehicle to their mercy.
Submitted by Audrey Davis


I highly recommend The Lusty Wrench,
2120 Lee Road,
Cleveland Heights, OH
216-371-8150.
Less than a mile from Cain Park.
Submitted by Paget Rose


I recommend Del’s Auto Service in Kansas City. Del McCollum is the best, as well as his assistant Ray. They’re located at 8016 Paseo.
816-333-2854

I also recommend Waldo Imports, 7222 Wornall, Kansas City, Mo, 816-361-6609. I don’t know their mechanics personally, but they’ve served my husband’s Honda for years and give good, reliable, honest service.
Submitted by Nancy Clark


My favorite local mechanic is George ( or Tony) at
5 Star Auto and Tire
4055 Louis Avenue
Holiday, FL.
His phone number is 727 942-2733.
Holiday is just north of Tarpon Springs, FL where I live.He’ll only do work that you really need. Once he gave me an estimate, lowered it later (after I gave him the go ahead) and when he was done, charged me less than the last estimate.
Submitted by Jack Roseman


Kramer’s Auto Electric and AC
Southwest corner of Broward Blvd. and State road 7 (Hyw 441)
Plantation, Florida (suburb of Ft. Lauderdale)
954 583-4998 or 954-792-6686
Ask for Frank or Frank Jr.

Been fixing my 88 Ford van and 89 Buick for years. Tell em’ Mr. Buehler sent you.

I know some other “mechanics”, but they fix things for the mob. You’re probably not interested in that.
Submitted by Carl Buehler


I love this mechanic:
O’Briens Automotive Service Center
629 Elm St.
Rockford, IL 61102
968-0302

They are very honest and charge fair prices.
Submitted by Deb Karash
Rockford, IL


Don’t know how many NAIA members would ever be traveling up in this neck of the woods but if so I have some information for Maine. I also ran across someone in North Carolina this past year, one in Jacksonville, Florida two years ago and yet another on Sanibel Island, Florida. This last one may no longer be in business though as businesses do change and it has been some time since my experience with him.
Let me know.
Beth Warner Photo

Definitely do a link to those Car Talk dudes Click and Clack, the Tappet Brothers, my heroes….I love their jokes…i.e. What do you call it when you throw a hand grenade into a French kitchen? Linoleum Blown Apart

Jim’s Service Center
Summer Street
Kennebunk, ME
207-985-4862

Owen Drive Service Center (only you pronounce it in North Carolina like Ohn Drive)
J.M. Peters (Owner)…a real character (and a mechanic on duty/24 hours)
2046 Owen Drive
Near Fayetteville
North Carolina
1-800-352-7415
910-678-2020
910-484-2101

Pep Boys
Jacksonville
Florida

Sanibel Servicecenters
MOBIL
Periwinkle Way
Sanibel Island
Florida
941-472-1878
914-472-2125


If you happen to run over an elk on a dark mountainous road in Utah one night on your way to Sausalito from Atlanta, don’t have your van towed to Jorgensen’s Ford (Richfield, UT). They replaced my radiator and did some other mechanical repairs to get me home to Atlanta, where the body work would be done. My Atlanta repair shop found that Jorgensen’s had put in a used, damaged radiator and charged me for a new one. They were surprised I made it home with it. And watch out for those elk-crossing and deer-crossing signs. They’re there for a reason (I’ve discovered, after having hit two cloven-hoofed beasts in my travels). My daughter says, Gee, Mom, now that you’ve gotten an elk and a deer, you can go to Africa and hit zebras and giraffes!

Those bear crossing signs in Florida were quite alarming.
Submitted by Margaret Dyer


I changed my muffler and tail pipe yesterday and am kind of proud of myself. Took only about 1/2 hour and no extra trips to the hardware store for the part I forgot to get. Usually I’m real slow, though, and don’t guarantee my work. I’ve been fortunate with vehicles going to shows (that’s just asking for it I suppose), but one year returning from Ann Arbor my old Volvo station wagon conked out in Western Iowa just around dusk. A highway crew was just knocking off for the day and radioed in to a shop in Adair, about 5 miles up the road. Then they gave me a lift into town, where I checked into a small, older, but clean motel. The next morning the owner drove into Omaha, almost an hour away, to get the timing belt and gear that had self destructed. I don’t remember the name of the garage, but it was the only one in town, and he didn’t charge me for the trip. This place was like going back to Mayberry. As I walked around town everyone who passed, waved. I had lunch in the cafe with the local farmers..about $3.50, including the best homemade strawberry-rhubarb pie in the universe. By then it was about 100 degrees out so I found the biggest shade tree around, and dozed till 2 when the job was done. Yep… next time you break down, do it near Adair, Iowa, and after, rather than before, the show.
Submitted by Bruce Teschner


JB Brown’s Auto Repair, 1105 Smokey Park Highway, Candler (just outside of Asheville), NC 28715, 828-670-1100.
A great guy who got me back on the road after the wheel fell off my van while driving on Interstate 40.
Submitted by Don Ament


I have two stories relating to The Road. Last year I had just finished Gasparilla and was returning to my winter studio in Ft. Lauderdale on Monday morning. I wasn’t feeling well when I got up and the pain in my abdomen continued to get worse. Halfway to Ft. Lauderdale (around Punta Gorda) I decided to use my cellular phone to call my significant other, J. B., to tell him I wasn’t feeling well and to try to make an appointment with a doctor for me. I continued to drive and started across Alligator Alley. The pain worsened until I was doubled over. I kept the cellular phone on. I did make it to Ft. Lauderdale where upon finding that I had a temperature of 104 deg., we called the doctor who told me to go to the hospital emergency room. My appendix had ruptured and I had it removed the next day. I had to cancel Miami Beach, but that was a good thing anyway!

My second story happened this year, again in Florida. After packing up Sunday night after Beaux Arts, I started North on I-95. In a very bad neighborhood in the North Miami area, I had a blow out, but was able to steer my van to the edge of the Interstate. Again, I had my cellular phone and called AAA. As I was waiting for AAA, a truck pulled up behind me and a man got out. Looking out of my side mirror with some trepidation, I finally recognized fellow artist, Richard Colavito. He had recognized me and my van on the side of the road, got off at the next exit and came back around to check on me. Richard stayed with me until the AAA truck came, which I really appreciated considering the neighborhood. Richard is not only an excellent artisan, but a very caring person. A policeman even stopped by to tell us that this was not a safe neighborhood, and then left! So, my advice is let’s keep an eye out for each other’s safety and keep that cellular phone nearby at all times. Happy Trails!
Submitted by Cynthia Davis.


Another artist and I were travelling from Canada to Idaho for a workshop in Rexburg. We had engine problems 100 miles away from our final destination. So close but, yet so far!! We encountered Big Bear Roadside Service in Dillon, Montana. Wonderful job!! It was Sunday and he tracked down a new water pump for us installed it in the rain at 2:00 AM and picked us up at our hotel and took us to the repaired car, then made sure we got back OK. He was great!

Made that expensive workshop in time and discovered that the people of the American midwest are hospitable and helpful and above all honest. So happy to have had such a good experience.
Submitted by Vivian Dere


I turn to Brown & Hart to keep my 1990 Dodge Caravan and 1996 Dodge Omni going. They’re located in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois – interstates 74 & 57 collide here, in the middle of the midwest. These two guys are like the National Public Radio duo from “Car Talk,” without the flair and national radio show. They’re as honest as the day is long, tell us when we’re driving with a real problem and when we’re driving with a problem that can be ignored for a while. They understand my show schedule and have never done anything that didn’t need to be done. They’re “no-frills” – but after driving a zillion makes/models, for non-warrantee work they’re my choice. I’ve been able to make it home to them with all my car troubles so far . . . knock on wood . . . but in the north/south corridor from Chicago to St. Louis to Memphis to Dallas, they’re a reliable place to take trouble in the Chicago/St. Louis trip.

Brown & Hart Automotive Enterprises
320 Water
Champaign, IL 61820
217-356-7440
Submitted by Cali Hobgood-Lemme


If you need mechanical help in the southwest corner of Michigan, I recommend O’Brien’s Battery and Expert Auto Service just outside Michigan City,IN. Located about 15 minutes from Exit 34B of I-94, they do a good, intelligent job on all types of service, not just batteries, and can accommodate large vehicles. Call 219-872-7878 for specific directions and throw yourself on Mark’s mercy. Maybe he will fit you in. Caution: bring a book. Once you are there, you are there. Nothing else around in this, oddly, primarily residential neighborhood.

O’Brien’s Battery and Expert Auto Service
Michigan City,IN
219-872-7878
Submitted by Eugenie Torgerson


Heading out to the new Portland, OR show? Try to break down in Pendleton, OR (off I-84) if possible! People come from hours away (even from Seattle!) to have Obie and his crew work on their vehicle. We were on the road in about an hour and a half. Nice folks and fair prices. The local Ford dealer (Pendleton Ford, 2225 Eastgate) referred us to Obie’s so they earn good points too, if you have a Ford.

Obie’s Import Repair
1114 S.W. Frazer
Pendleton, OR
541-276-2061

My local mechanic is a gem:
Michael’s Automotive Services
622 N. 8th St.
Boise, ID
208-344-4114
Submitted by Michael Hamilton


In Philadelphia:
Joe Sullivan at Palm Auto, Blair and E. Norris Sts.
Submitted by M.R. Daniels


If anyone has car problems along I-90 northwest of Chicago our local mechanic, Gene Pace, is about as reliable and conscientious as they come. His shop is in Gilberts, IL – just north of Elgin. His prices are in line with other reasonable repair operations in this area and he has the added bonus of being very sympathetic to the problems of dealing with car disasters. His phone # is 847-428-6300. (Unfortunately he can sometimes be also very busy if you need a repair on the spot.)
Submitted by Kathy Eaton


In Boone, NC it’s Frank at AAA Tire and Auto Center, 744 HWY.105 Extention, 828-264-8473.
Submitted by Banister Pope


Jon’s Import Auto Service, 707 S. Main St., Lexington, Va. 540-463-3711, pretty sure he’ll work on about anything, nice honest guy. Lexington is an I-81 location, if you are unfortunate enough to be driving on I-81 these days.
Submitted by Michael Kopald


Miller’s Auto Repair, 994 Blanding Blvd. Suite 116, Orange Park, FL 904-213-1180,
The owner was very nice. I received a quote for over $1000.00 and they repaired my Ford Tarus for $480.00. Just thought I would pass this along.
Submitted by Tammy


Sato’s Auto Repair Center
2029 W Venice Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90006


Thumbnail Gallery

Clicking on a name will display the thumbnail. Click your “back” button to return here. Thanks must go to the art fair websites, many of whom are beginning to display images from exhibitors – I stole many!

Barbara Abel
Ernest Abel
Carol Adams
Obayana Ajanaku
Don Ament
Linette C. Arakawa
John Armistead
Carlene Dingman Atwater
Ron Aubuchon
Stephen Bach
Susan Bach
Connie Baker
Michael Baker
Carl Bandy
Maureen Banner
Robert Barab
Cathra-anne Barker
Christine Bartling
Cort Bassett
Maija Baynes
Donna Beaubien
Bert Beirne
Julie Bender
Devon Bennett
Larry Berman
John Berry
Jerry Berta
Gail Beveridge
Natalie Blake
Bonnie Blandford
Deborah Bloom
Betsy Bohrer
Michael Bond
Carol Boucher
Victoria B. Brago
Ann Brauer
Laura Breitman & Michael Needleman
Christine Brenner
Robert Bridenbaugh
Sally J. Bright
Robert Briscoe
Curt Brock
Mary Brodhagen
Dana Brown
Gene Brown
Paula L. Brown-Steedly
Jack Brumbaugh
Gordon Bruno
Barbara Buckingham
Lisa Burge
Helen Burkett
Sally Cahill
Pam Caidin
Sheila Caim
Todd Cameron
Richard A. Carlson
Reno Carollo
Galen Carpenter
Theresa Carson
Tony Casper
Christopher Castelli
Darron Chadwick
John Charbonneau
Robert W. Chatelain
Zeny Cieslikowski
Nancy Clark
Peggy Cohen
Peter Cohen
William Colburn
Carolyn Cole
Jacquelyne Collett
Deborah T. Colter
Jeff Condon
Will Connor
Karen Cooper
Eddie Corkery
Sara Corkery
Merry Cox
Bradley Cross
Juan Miguel Cukier
C.L. Cunningham
Lisa Marie D’Agostino
Sandi Dahl
Randy Dana
Norm Darwish – Connie Mettler
Cynthia Davis
Jody dePew McLeane
Joelle Deroy
Danielle Desplan
Stephen Dickerson
Karen Dickey
Ray I. Doan
Glenn Donovan
Sharon M. Donovan
Jan Dorer
Margaret Dyer
Coco Easterwood
James Eaton
Kathleen Eaton
Roberta Elliott
Janis Ellsworth
Deborah B. Elmquist
James Emery
Jim Engebretson
Renee Nielsen Engebretson
Kimberly Erickson
Gerard Erley
Paul Eshelman
Glenna Evans
Dorothy Fagan
Jennifer C. Fenner
Kathleen Field
Carol Fitzsimmons
Jill Flinn
Laurie Fowler
Carla M. Fox
Ricky Frank
Jan Frazee
Diane French
Carol Fugmann
Sylvia Fugmann Brongo
Sandi Garris
Charles Gatewood
Nolly Gelsinger
Bob Gent
Jonas Gerard
Claudette Gerhold
Paul Gerhold
Paul Germain
Martha Giberson
Deborah Gilbert
LaDes Glanzer
William Goldman
Christina Goodman
David Gordon
Sue Brown Gordon
David Greenbaum
Charles Greenholdt, A.W.S.
Barbara Gundle
John Gunther
Terry Habeger
Michael Hamilton
Tom Haney
John Harris
Diane Harty
Chia Haruta
Elizabeth Haughton
Jerome Hawkins
Marsha Heatwole
Patricia Hecker
Valerie Hector
Neil Herman
Ginny Herzog
Cali Hobgood-Lemme
Jo Hoersten
David Hunter
Thomas Irven
Jennifer Ivory
Christian James
Dale Jarrett
Barbara Bouman Jay
Ken Jensen
LizAnne Jensen
Alan Jewett
Nicario Jimenez
Mamie Joe
Sharon Johnston
Aletha Jones
C.G. “Woody” Jones
Ray Jones
Pat Juneau
Suzanne Juneau


Madeline Kaczmarczyk
Patricia Kamlin
Matt Kaplinsky
Cecile Keith
Lynn Kendall
Walt Kendall
Susan Keyes
Karen Kinser
Duke Klassen
Alan Klug
Joachim Knill
Kim Koch
Michael Kopald
Stephen Kostyshyn
Lynn Krause
Richard Krogstad
Barbara Krupp
James LaCasse
Timothy Langholz
Susan Larysz
William G. Lathrop
Gregory Lawler
Judy Leach
Deb LeAir
Mitchell Lebold
Mi Young Lee
Jim Lemyre
Lynn Lemyre
Michele LeVett
Susan Levi-Goerlich
David Levy
Ann L. Light
Amy C. Lund
William Lurcott
Mitch Lyons
Christopher Lyons-Bruno
Lenny Lyons-Bruno
Aaron Macsai
Brian Maguire
Chris Maher
Denise Mancour
Jay Mann
Mary Mark
Cheryl Marsden
Charlene Marsh
Kelly Marshall
Sharon Matusiak
Howard McAvoy
Duncan McClellan
Jay McDougall
Samantha McGovern
Terry McIlrath
Craig McMillin
Rita Meech
Danny Meisinger
Bruce Meyer
Jonathan Meyer
Richard Meyer
Tommy Michael
Anna Millea
Bart Miller
Janet Miller
Marti Mocahbee
Michael Mode
Ron Montag
Stephanie Nadolski
Rita Naron
Jeanne Nash
Brian K. Neely
A. Cesar Nogueira
Jean Novak
Ginger E. O’Neil
Lori O’Neill
Patrick O’Neill
Lawrence W. Oliverson
Rita Orr
Janet Parke
James Parker
Jim Parmentier
Shirl Parmentier
Jeanette Payne
Gail Perazzini
Polly E. Perkins
James Petran
Laura Pieper
Barbara Pihos
Banister Pope
H.C. Porter
Marv Poulson
Rick Preston
Rone Prinz
Dale Rayburn
Gregory Reade
Margaret Regan
Lee Rentz
Maria Reyes-Jones
Mark Reynolds
Jack Richardson
Larry Richardson
Larry Richmond
Belinda Riley
Michael Riley
Jeff Ripple
Sarah Rishel
Dee Roberts
Jim Roberts
Jack Roseman
Beth Rosengard
Laurie Rossbach
Rocky Rothschiller
Jon Michael Route
M. Runnells
Karen M. Samson
J. Luray Schaffner
John A. Schaffner
Aida Schneider
Robinson Scott
Jeffrey Seaton
Katrina Seaton
Stephen Sebastian
Garry Seidel
Andrew Shea
Steve Shepard
Marsha Silverman
Celeste M. Simon
Shia Simone
James Skvarch
Les Slesnick
Archie Smith
Linda Stiles Smith
Randall Smith
Beau Stahl
Bill Starke
Marian Steen
Linda Steinworth
Daryl Storrs
Nancy Strailey
Barbara Sucherman
Mary Margaret Sweeney
Lee Tannenbaum
Sharon Teaman
Allan Teger
Rita Telaak
Cat Tesla
Bill Thelen
Mel Thompson
Michel Tsouris
Bill Turner
J Vee
Fred Wackerle
Jon Walton
Leslie Ward
Robin Washburn
Bart Webb
Michael Weber
Carol Westlake
C.T. Whitehouse
James Wilbat
H. Dean Willis
Philip Wilson
Karen Windchild
Tom Wirt
Robert Wolf
Derek Youngquist
Suzanne Yurdin
Jeffrey Zachmann
Claudia Zeber-Martell
Judy Zeddies

2005 NAIA ANNUAL BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING SYNOPSIS

Dear Members

The 2005 Annual Meeting of the NAIA Board of Directors was held January 21 & 22 in Atlanta, Georgia. We welcomed our two new board members, Janet Parke and Woody Jones.

Executive Directors Report

Ardath Prendergast delivered the Executive Directors report, which included information on many administrative and programmatic areas of the organization. From the report, discussion ensued on various matters, including:

Digital Imaging/ZAPP Seminars

NAIA has held a number of digital workshops and seminars at various shows and locations around the country. The information on these seminars can be found on the NAIA website. We discussed the attendance, the success, the cost of and the benefits to those attending. It was decided that the seminars will be evaluated at the end of March before arranging any new ones. It may be that the need for seminars will decline as ZAPP becomes more widely used and other digital imaging questions become less of a concern for art show artists, though the opportunity for artists to view their work projected by the digital projector was thought to be necessary and ongoing.

Artist Conference

There was a report on the upcoming 2005 Artist Conference at Maumee Bay, Ohio, July 24-26 which is shaping up to be the best yet. The AC Committee is preparing the agenda and programming. Sara Corkery designed beautiful cards announcing the conference. These will be distributed primarily at art shows between now and July.
Further conference info may be obtained on the NAIA website.

Artist Copyright Issues

There was discussion of the ongoing relationship between NAIA, WESTAF and ZAPP. WESTAF continues to turn to NAIA for guidance with the system, and NAIA is continuing its efforts in having shows disclose information and procedures of importance to artists on the shows profile page. There was also discussion of the copyright protection issue. Presently, WESTAF and the ZAPP partner shows are reviewing a document authored by NAIA with the assistance of our attorney concerning copyrights. As has been discussed on the Member Forum and with our attorney, copyrights protect themselves. The purpose for this document is for shows to acknowledge and respect artist copyrights.. Copyright infringement by an art show is against the law, and as such is open for prosecution. It was noted that the handling of artists images is an issue for all art shows, and the NAIA will adopt the document below as an advocacy to be promoted to all art shows. This version is basically the same as that which we are urging ZAPP to adopt and include as part of a ZAPP licensees profile page. The text of the copyright document is:

Art Show Acknowledgment to Respect Artist Copyrights

As an Organizer, Producer, or Promoter (Organizer) of this art show, art fair, or festival (Art Show), it is acknowledged that artists and artist applicants (Artist or Artists) may hold copyrights on the digital images (Images) of their artwork that they submit as part of an application to Organizers Art Show as follows:

A. Organizer acknowledges that the Images submitted as part of Artists profile and application to Organizers Art Show shall be used only for the purpose of displaying to Organizers jurors as part of the judging and selection process for inclusion in Organizers Art Show, and that Artists retain and reserve all rights, title, and interest in the Image and all Copyright, including but not limited to all rights of reproduction.

B. In the event that an Artist is selected to exhibit in Organizers Art Show, Organizer further acknowledges that use of Artists Images is limited to a one-time usage of such Images in Organizers program, website and/or other non-merchandising advertising. The Images should not be otherwise reproduced, loaned, or syndicated for any other purposes without the prior express written permission from the Artist. If Organizer desires to use Images for any purpose other than in its official program and/or on its website as speciically granted herein, Organizer is advised to get prior written permission from the Artist. Organizer recognizes that should such permission not be obtained, Artist could elect to pursue any copyright violation procedures to which they may be legally entitled.

C. Any reproduction of Artists Image(s) as described in Item #2 above should include the copyright symbol (), date of publication and the name of the artist in a conspicuous place next to, or adjacent to, the image.

By checking the I Acknowledge option below, Organizer confirms to Artists that Organizer acknowledges the copyrights of Artists Images described above.

__ I Acknowledge
__ I Do Not Acknowledge
_________________________________
(Signed) Organizer of Art Show

Officer and Committee Assignments

Janet Parke was elected Secretary of NAIA

Board and Staff Committee positions were assigned. A list of all those serving on Committees can be found on the website.

2006 Directors Conference

The Director Conference was discussed; it is planned to be held in connection with Art Fest Fort Meyers in sunny Florida in February 2006. It will be open to artists, similar to the Artist Conference being open to show directors.

2005 Board Goals and Initiatives

Discussion turned to what the board hopes to specifically accomplish in 2005 besides the Strategic Planning:

A. An Ad Hoc committee will study, revise and recommend advocacy positions for NAIA. The goal will be to include position papers on those advocacies deemed to be the most important and realistic to accomplish. The position papers will be sent to shows, along with a disclosure questionnaire inquiring into the various policies and practices of the show.

B. Based on those advocacies and the questionnaire responses, the committee will develop a show rating system that would identify those shows that listen to the artists and those that do not (i.e., artist-friendly shows).

C. Publish an NAIA Newspaper printed on news stock and financed by advertisements. This newspaper would be distributed free of charge to artists at art shows. The idea is to reach all artists with interesting information, pro and con position articles on issues that affect all of us, and do something positive and fun to identify NAIA as the worthwhile organization it is.

NAIA Budget and 2005 Income and Expenses

One of the most significant issues addressed at the meeting was the 2005 budget. If you looked at the budget in the recent newsletter, you may have noticed that NAIA is operating at a deficit. The reserves that NAIA holds will be able to cover the shortfall for this year. If NAIA is going to continue its efforts and grow with a paid staff, additional funds will be required. As a 501(c) 6 trade association, the most significant means of obtaining funds is through dues. Other possibilities include the continued donations of some artist and contributing members above the level of dues, some small fundraising efforts, advertising in the newsletter, the proposed newspaper, or website, and the possible profitability of the Conferences. However, unless NAIA income grows through an increase in memberships or increase in dues, the NAIA will be unable to continue to function in its present form. This will be an issue of critical importance in the long-range strategic planning.

NAIAs financial picture has changed significantly due to the addition of paid staff. The board has come to the realization that NAIA cannot operate as an organization without at least a half-time paid Executive Director, and stipends to the Webmaster and Membership Coordinator. We have been paying the stipends for some time, but those amounts have been minimal.

The board decided to increase Ardaths position to half-time, doubling her quarter-time salary. Our webmaster, Michael Hamilton, received a well deserved 25% increase and the Director of Communications, Sara Corkery was provided a stipend of $1000. Presently, the Membership Coordinator position is vacant, but should be filled soon. This represents a significant commitment to our staff and to NAIAs funds. The board believes that this is essential for the health and effectiveness of NAIA. The budget was passed.

The board discussion moved to the necessity of raising dues. Some members of NAIA express the opinion that NAIA should represent all art show artists, that the Forum and the SIF should be open to non-members, and that NAIA should develop programs to benefit all art show artists. That leaves two choices: either the present members of NAIA will have to cover for their non-paying colleagues, or membership must increase. Increasing our membership is the key to keeping dues low. If each member attracted just one new member we would be on very firm financial ground.

Unless the number of our memberships increases by at least 300 there isnt another comfortable option. Reluctantly, it was decided to raise dues as of August 1st. Any artist who becomes a member by August 1st would do so at $55. The increase to take effect on August 2nd will be dependent on the membership numbers at that time.

A Personal Note from the Chair

During the January board meeting, we spent a great deal of time discussing the NAIAs current condition, board responsibilities and membership expectations. It was quite valuable to talk face to face among ourselves about the present and future state of NAIA. Board members expressed a genuine commitment to wanting to make a difference, to accomplishing the goals we have set, but are personally concerned about the time, energy and resources required to meet these challenges.

It has taken a long time to get NAIA on firm organizational ground, and there are still a few things that need attention. The rather burdensome process for dealing with membership data is being addressed, and all the financial data has been computerized. Thanks to Ardath, the budget is now itemized and there are mechanisms in place for communication within NAIA and to the outside.

Over the past year this board has been responsible for finding and hiring a new Executive Director, a new Communications Director, organizing and attending Artist and Director Conferences, board meetings, searches for replacement board members, ZAPP, Town Hall meetings, SIF, surveys and data compilation, communicating with the membership and with each other, and the continuing efforts of Strategic Planning. It takes a lot of time and effort, and so far has left little time to take on specific tasks, such as the promotion of artist advocacies and the improvement of the art show environment. We want that to change, and we all must be realistic. Obviously, the effort at long-range goals and strategic planning is aimed at identifying who NAIA is and what it wants to and will be able to accomplish.

One thing the board is aware of, but which may not be clear to the membership, is how much it takes to continue the efforts now being made. Last year we worked with a minimally compensated staff of three partial-time workers. Ardath was hired at one-quarter time, but worked full time. Michael Hamilton, who has been with us from te beginning, is responsible for the maintenance of the website, all forums (Member, Board, Board Emeritus, Show Information Forum, art show directors, and several staff forums), as well as e-communiqus and technical support for the membership. He receives a small compensation for this work, but is more of a volunteer than he is paid staff. NAIA also has a paid position for membership data and dues collection, but the position is now vacant and Ardath has temporarily accepted the handling of those duties. The board (which also acts as staff) and a very few member volunteers manage the rest. It is unrealistic to expect the board to take on much more. In order for NAIA to continue to grow and be effective, it is critical that we have a paid staff and a much larger base of member volunteers willing to commit time and energy to the tasks that need to be accomplished

There are many things that a non-artist staff would be in a better position to handle, and there are things, like the evaluation of art show practices, that we as artists are better equipped to address. However, the volunteer board of NAIA cannot continue to do all the necessary work of running the organization, carrying out the program and committee work, and take on any further tasks until the infrastructure of the organization is secure.

Below is an overview of the state of NAIA, and what your $55 in dues provides.

NAIA Member Assets:

  • Website
  • Forum
  • Newsletter
  • Conferences
  • Survey Mechanism
  • Outreach in the form of Town Hall Meetings
  • The Show Information Forum
  • Discounts on hotels, rentals, and equipment.
  • Membership
  • Respected, Collective Voice

NAIA Personnel:

  • Director
  • Webmaster
  • Membership and database administrator
  • Communications
  • Board of Directors
  • Volunteers


These are the efforts that exist for the economic and professional success of NAIAs members. Its pretty impressive so far. Think about it: Is it what the membership wants from NAIA? The Strategic Planning and upcoming surveys may provide the answer. We have much that we want to do, but the accomplishments so far are significant.

  • The website is full of valuable information and services for all art show artists. Members may have a web page of their own showcasing their work, for a very small charge, and no fee after that.
  • The member Forum has turned into a civil, interesting, wealth of knowledge and a platform for a professional exchange of ideas and opinions.
  • The newsletter is a valuable tool for communication with our members and other art show artists, as well as containing informative articles. With the NAIA Newsletter now available on line, it is more accessible and less expensive to create and distribute, and now contains more graphics and color.
  • The Director Conference, now in its seventh year, has been successful at bringing together art show directors from around the country, allowing them the exchange of ideas, networking and the presentation of the artists point of view to art shows.
  • The Artist Conference, now in its third year, is a fine opportunity for artists to get together away from the show environment, and learn more about the artistic and business side of our lives.
  • Through the efforts of the Board Input and Survey Committee, NAIA is now able to survey members and others online and obtain information directly from artists on a wide variety of subjects.
  • The Town Hall Meetings are a great communication tool that takes advantage of artists gathering in large numbers at art shows, and makes it possible to reach members and non-members alike.
  • The Show Information Forum is in its infancy, and is being tweaked to make improvements. There are over 179 users and 175 articles available to read about a variety of art shows. This asset more than any other relies on the membership to thrive and strengthen.
  • The Benefits Committee has worked diligently to provide real monetary savings to the membership. These savings can easily offset the small yearly dues.
  • 550+ membership
  • Finally, and possibly NAIAs greatest asset, is its respected collective voice. Our collective voice was the #1 response to a recent survey asking what would be the most significant loss should NAIA cease existence. We can all surely thank the Founders of NAIA, past Presidents and Board Members for their levelheaded, professional, and ethical behavior, which provided the foundation upon which NAIA can build today.

At present, NAIA is at a crossroads. The vocal memberships biggest concern seems to be conditions at art shows — from the nuts and bolts of loading and unloading, booth spaces, and show procedures; to sales, marketing, and respect for art show artists. Within the structure and resources of NAIA, decisions must be made about what direction to take. We continue to work on those, and we reach out to our membership to help.

Respectfully submitted,

Michael Kopald
Chair, NAIA

BEGINNINGS: EARLY HISTORY OF THE NAIA

Since the first meeting in at the Old Town Art Fair in Chicago, the organizing committee and other interested parties have held several other meetings. Follow the links for a short history of the NAIA.

November, 1995
Banister Pope worked out an agenda for the meeting at the Lakefront Stage in Orlando.

March, 1996
A meeting after the Winter Park Art Festival.

April, 1996
A letter to members.

July, 1996
A meeting after the 1996 Ann Arbor Art Fairs.

November, 1996
A long letter to members.

July 1997
A “retreat” after the 1997 Ann Arbor Art Fairs. Report by Bob Briscoe.

Lynn Krause

ARTIST INFORMATION

METHOD OF WORK

I work with pastels on black Arches rag cover stock paper. I do very little blending, preferring to to layer my pastels to alter the color. I begin the work with hard pastels, finishing with the softer pastels. I apply spray fixative to hold the color. My images are derivations of photographs I take. I am currently working only in pastels.

Woodstock, IL
Home: 815-338-3072
Work:
Fax: 815-338-3072
Web: LynnKrause.com

Spring 2001 Director’s Conference

Monday, April 23, 2001
Ft Worth, TX

There was a breakfast from 8am to 9am for participants.

Larry Oliverson welcomed everyone and talked about the great mutual benefits that the last two conferences have afforded both artists and art fair directors. Everyone introduced themselves with the art fair directors relating with which show they were affiliated and NAIA members telling their area of responsibility within NAIA.


Agenda Item: Slide Information Statements-Universal/Online applications

Larry introduced Anthony Radich and Matthew Saunders of the Western States Arts Federation (WESTAF) who were there to give a presentation about creating a Universal Online Application (UOA). The concept of a simplified universal application had been discussed earlier but putting it online was first suggested by directors at an IFEA conference. Larry Oliverson of the NAIA, Shary Brown of the Ann Arbor Street Art Fair, and Stephen King of MAIN ST. Fort Worth Arts Festival met with WESTAF in Chicago last year to further explore the concept (two other directors had emergency cancellations). The presentation by Radich and Saunders was the result of that meeting.

Radich and Saunders introduced themselves and related their backgrounds. They told the group about WESTAF. WESTAF concentrates their efforts primarily in the 12 western states and works with arts agencies and organizations. They maintain an on line Artist Register which they previewed for the group.

Radich and Saunders work with the technology arm of WESTAF assisting arts groups in ways to reduce work load through technology in order to keep them viable and healthy. They are interested in the Universal Online Application project as a benefit for both artists and art festivals. Artists would be able to apply to art fairs more efficiently by filling out an application only once for several shows. Fair directors indicated that the majority of their applications arrive postmarked close to the deadline date. Art festivals would benefit by reduced paperwork and data entry. The system is a cross platform system that would allow any art festival to then plug the data into any programs they have.

Radich and Saunders outlined the basic concept of the UOA: There would be a single application form on a site that would be managed by a server. Artists would go to this online site, fill out the application only once and then select the fairs to which he/she wanted to apply. The application would then be sent to a “mail box” for each show and then sent to each show address. They stressed the importance for each show to maintain its individuality in the design of the UOA. This individuality could be achieved with the addition of pop-up menus and other methods.

Matthew Saunders discussed the technical aspect of the UOA. He stated that accessibility to the internet is increasingly becoming a non-issue because most people have ready access to the internet either through their own computers or library computers. He cited that many grant organizations successfully use online applications. Art fair organizations would not have to upgrade computer systems or have specialized software to utilize the UOL as the software would be housed on the site on the internet. Jury fees and booth fees could be paid either by credit card or electronic funds transfer via secure systems or sent in by check with the slides which would still be sent via regular mail. Any required signatures on the applications could be sent via an electronic signatures program or the statement could be printed out, signed and sent in with the slides. There would be an automated backup system to eliminate any lost applications and data.

Mr. Saunders stressed that there would be a transition period when art festivals would be accepting both hard copy and online applications. If such a UOA were to be utilized, its implementation would be a gradual process. Only a few art festivals would be added at any one time in order to work out any “bugs”. A person on the art festival’s staff would have to be trained in the system.

Core elements of the UOA were described:

  • Name of artist
  • Business or studio name
  • Address
  • City
  • State
  • Zip Code
  • Check box if this is new address
  • Phone (day-eve)
  • E-mail address
  • Fax
  • Artist web site URL
  • Slide descriptions: Slide number, dimensions of work, materials/techniques.
  • Categories: Pop-up menu for individual shows since shows define their categories differently
  • Signature: Electronic or hardcopy signature to be sent n with slides/checks.

The following fields were discussed as possible inclusions in the UOA:

  • Cell phone numbers. As artists often are on the road and have cell phones, they would be available for wait list notification by cell phone speeding up the wait list process.
  • Names of partners and/or collaborators and how they contribute to the work
  • Signing up for services such as demonstrating or auction donations.
  • Promotional Postcards: Does the artist want any and how many?
  • Slide Information Statement: The 20-word or less description of work.
  • Check box to allow artists to choose to have their name and address given to all shows in database.

It was stressed that in designing the UOA, it should be kept in mind that only important and vital information should be included in the basic design and other items could be entered in individual show pop-up menus.

Other questions/answers and discussions were:

  • Could/would the applications be dated? Yes, each one would have an imprint of the date and time of receipt.
  • Could the artist receive confirmation of the receipt of the application? Yes, an e-mail confirmation would be sent to each applicant with a copy of the application so they could check for errors.
  • All applications go to a centralized server. When the deadline is past, all applications are forwarded to the festival.
  • On line “slides” were discussed and it was felt that the technology was not there yet. 35mm slides should still be utilized and sent via regular mail.

Mr. Radich and Mr. Saunders summed up that they would use the information gathered at the conference to further refine the UOA and would explore funding for the project. The WESTAF notes can be reviewed here.


Agenda Item: Jury Selection/Instruction

Rick Foris, former NAIA Category Advisor Committee Chairman, discussed the importance of imparting clear instructions to the slide jurors. Instructions should also include a prospectus for the show, mission statement of the festival, what is expected of the jurors, and whether or not the show desires a balance in categories. All of the above should be in writing and also imparted verbally.

There was discussion on using an exhibiting artist on the slide jury. NAIA advocates that shows include an active art festival artist as one of their panel of jurors. Discussion followed as to whether that artist should/could be an award winner, someone who is not doing the show at all, or one who is nominated by artists from the previous year’s show like the American Crafts Council practices.

There was discussion as to what art festival directors expect of the booth slide, how and why it is used. The primary expectations were based on a desire to view the artist’s body of work in addition to specific samples and to view the artist’s presentation. Booth slides also give a preview of what the show will look like and serve as a visual “contract” between the artist and the show. There was consensus that the show should impart this information to the artists through their show prospectus as well as imparting this information to the slide jurors.

The show directors wished to relay to the artists that NO NAMES or FACES of the artist should appear in the booth slide. Many artists are still doing this.

The topic of Rules Enforcement came up periodically in numerous contexts and the importance of shows to:

  1. Make rules that are enforceable
  2. Enforce their rules
  3. Talk directly to the artist when there is an issue

One director asked what shows charged for their jury fees. Mitch Lyons asked about what jurors were paid. Discussion of these questions was reserved for the Open Agenda at the end of the day but the jury selection discussion continued on the second day.


Agenda Item: Computerized Jury Score Tabulation – A presentation by Rick Bryant and Pam Lautsch from the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts

Larry Oliverson introduced Rick Bryant of the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts and Pam Lautsch, a long-time volunteer of the Festival. He stated that it is helpful for shows to be able to get instant feedback of the jury results and that CPFA has devised a system that does just that.

Rick and Pam began by describing their system as it had been in the past and what problems they saw in that system which prompted them to instigate change in 1994. Pam devised this system using a Microsoft Access application. This is a database that is capable of being sorted by query and is a relational based system as opposed to a flat file based system.

Set-Up:

  • First the slides are categorized and artist information is entered into the master computer: name, address, media, and body of work description.
  • There is a point determined when no more applications are being accepted. After all are entered into the main computer, the master database is frozen.
  • Lap top computers are rented for each juror and are then reviewed for hardware functionality: mice, cables, etc. The software is loaded into the lap tops.
  • The minimal artist information needed for the jury is then copied to the juror lap top computers.
  • A master computer is prepared for the festival staff. Scores are ultimately collated and results printed.

Juror Arrival:

  • Each juror is given a laptop, instruction is provided and there is a run through of a test category. Jurors view projected slides and score on the laptops. Those who are not accustomed to direct computer input were initially skeptical but were found to be willing to try and quickly became comfortable with the procedure.

File Compilation:

  • At a stretch break, the files from each of the juror’s computers are copied to a floppy. Each of these mini databases is then copied to the master computer. Scores are compiled via a single click. Decisions regarding where the cut off point is made by the Festival staff. It is found that there is generally a natural break for the cut off point.
  • After each category is judged, the data is entered into the master computer, the staff determines the cut off point, and the slides are then pulled for a final run through of all categories at the end of the day.

Problems that Occur:

  • There were surprisingly few problems. There was a safeguard built into the system if a juror failed to enter their data. Each artist was given a score of 9 before the jurying began. The jury score range was from 1-7). Scores are reviewed constantly during the jury and if a 9 shows up, the jury could be stopped and back up to that point. Number slides to the left of each artist’s slides helps jurors keep on track with the correct set of slides for each artist.

Advantages:

  • It is quick.
  • Several sources of error are removed.
  • Overall jury time is reduced.
  • Fatigue is significantly reduced.
  • Database methodology permits inputting of data into other applications.
  • Reports can be developed.
  • Is created with a software program (Microsoft Access) that is familiar to many computer support people.

Disadvantages:

  • Needs someone who is technologically competent.
  • Needs access to enough lap top computers for each juror.
  • Danger of sensory overload with a dark room and computer screen.
  • Jurors are usually new to technology, though this will be a non-issue in the near future.

Enhancements:

  • Increased functionality of artist data.
  • Streamlines the data entry process.
  • Makes booth assignment easier.
  • Can create meaningful reports.

Short-term Enhancements:

  • Use a Sneaker Net: small network set up between the juror lap tops that will allow instant and automatic transfer of jury scores to a main computer. The floppy will no longer be used to transfer data.

Future:

  • Use of Palm Tops or other hand-held type computers: infrared capabilities to download jury data. These can also be used as an extension to the on site jury process.
  • Bar coding with juror signs for the on site jury process.
  • Online Call for Entry information can be put directly into the database.

Anticipated Changes:

  • No immediate plans to change their system as it is. They view their jurors as an advisory panel and see the need to view and talk to jurors. The use of technology is secondary to the jury process.

Follow-up Discussion:

  • The follow-up discussion presented the idea of showing the invited artists slides first to see what is already in the show.
  • One show asked jurors to talk a bit about their own artwork.
  • It was emphasized that the prospectus should illustrate the physical placement and order of slides, i.e.. linear, grid, etc.
  • The pros and cons of the use of scanned jpeg images of slides was discussed. The result is that the technology is simply not there yet and there are too many variables at this point to make it usable.
  • How can other art fairs use this or a similar system? Other art festivals can develop their own systems fairly easily on their own. CPFA has no plans at this time to market their system.

Agenda Item: Audience Development – Public Education – Working with the Media- Interpreting “Quality” in Events

Larry Oliverson presented a paper written by Edward Avila titled, “Quality in the Art Shows” which was used as a jumping off point for this discussion. One of Mr. Avila’s suggestions is that a “quality” art festival can best be determined by incorporating a position of an art director in addition to an event director. Since an event director may or may not be knowledgeable about art, it would be the function of the art director to put together a jury panel that would ensure a quality show. The art director would also be sensitive to the needs of the artists at the show.

A suggestion was made to explore on-site jurying.

Working with the Media was discussed. Festivals need information from the artists to provide to the media for advertising. It was recommended that a media consultant be invited to the next Directors’ Conference to discuss how shows and artists can get a better response from the media. It was mentioned that the media often concentrates on the shock factor and just wants to know what went badly. The media needs a focus and often will select an artist or couple of artists on which to focus.

Recommendations included:

  • Festivals should provide guidelines to the artists of what exactly is needed.
  • Shows should post communiqus to the artists about what media coverage has taken place.
  • The NAIA newsletter should urge artists to fill out those publicity forms that the shows send out prior to the shows so that they will get better media coverage.
  • A knowledgeable show volunteer could take the media through the show and direct them.
  • Get local artists to volunteer to let the media come into their studios for local color.
  • Hire a good PR company.
  • Feed information constantly to the media.
  • Have pre-show events for the media.
  • NAIA could have a bank of film footage of individual artists working.
  • Show should send own PR Company and film artists etc to feed the media information.
  • Ask award winners from the previous year to come in early to meet with the media for interviews etc.
  • The media wants to know “what is new?”
  • Present to specific media an “exclusive” as the media likes to have exclusive angles.
  • Select “effective” artists who are articulate and not shy by screening artists ahead of time.
  • Multi-disciplinary events: have difficulties with media picking up art vs. performance.